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Help Needed Re:conifers!


Guest *Ice*

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Guest *Ice*

Why do my conifers keep turning brown and dying off so quickly? Someone mentioned 'wind-burn'? I water them regularly through their leaves/branches but they all seem to just dry up. Any ideas as i dont want to buy some more for this to happen again? (they are in big planters,bought like that).

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Posted
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
  • Weather Preferences: Thunder, snow, heat, sunshine...
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.

    Are they Leylandii, SDI?

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    Guest *Ice*
    Are they Leylandii, SDI?

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Theyre about 2-3 feet high and 'were' light green.......dont know if that helps!

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    Posted
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
  • Weather Preferences: Thunder, snow, heat, sunshine...
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.

    Well, mine (conifers) used to turn brown in early summer every year. I could never decide whether they'd been damaged by cold, dry weather in spring -or, whether the summer was doing it...I pulled 'em up in the end...

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    Posted
  • Location: St. Albans, Herts
  • Location: St. Albans, Herts
    Theyre about 2-3 feet high and 'were' light green.......dont know if that helps!

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    I think there is a non-hardy conifer which is light yellowy/green and that size so it maybe that it's not enjoying the british winters.

    Sorry, not sure what type, just know we used to have a prticular one which always used to keel over in an exposed spot, but was OK when we put it somewhere more sheltered

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    Posted
  • Location: St. Albans, Herts
  • Location: St. Albans, Herts

    I gues that might be it....but ours were never in direct sunlight, it was the winter that did for them...

    Might be worth a try moving them though...

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    Posted
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
  • Weather Preferences: Thunder, snow, heat, sunshine...
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.

    Are they potted ones?

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    Posted
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
  • Weather Preferences: Thunder, snow, heat, sunshine...
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.

    Roo could well be right then? Try giving them some shelter... :D

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    Posted
  • Location: south wales
  • Location: south wales
    Yeah,in big planters.

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Have you tried the water holding pellets, just in case they are getting dried out and thats whats causing it?? just a thought hope it helps :D

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    Posted
  • Location: Taunton, Somerset
  • Location: Taunton, Somerset

    Hi all

    It can take a conifer several years to show that it isn't happy. When the leaves all start turning brown then it's usually too late.

    The chances are that they were a) frosted or :D dried out during the winter. Unfortunately a partly browned conifer seldom recovers to look good again. ;)

    Pull them up and start again.

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    Posted
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
  • Weather Preferences: Thunder, snow, heat, sunshine...
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.

    Mine were meant to be a hedge...They were useless!

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    Posted
  • Location: Lindum Colonia
  • Location: Lindum Colonia

    You said you water them through their branches. You're not getting water on the actual branches/leaves are you? If you are, you could be scorching the plant.

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    Guest *Ice*
    You said you water them through their branches. You're not getting water on the actual  branches/leaves are you? If you are, you could be scorching the plant.

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    :D Erm,yes i do water them from ontop aswell as into the soil itself.....oooops! ;)

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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts
  • Weather Preferences: Rain/snow, fog, gales and cold in every season
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts

    Scribbler is correct in saying that a conifer can take a long time to show that it doesn't like its conditions.

    The most likely causes of conifers in pots turning brown are;

    The pots became waterlogged or froze during the winter

    The soil has dried out at some time

    An alternation between too wet and too dry.

    There are a few conifers/evergreens which will make a recovery from turning brown ie Yew, Thuja, some Cypresses, Juniper as these species are able to send new shoots from old wood.

    The majority however will either never recover or will take a very long time for the green and living part to fill in and cover the brown and dead.

    If the brown and dead covers more than 30% of the plant I'd give up and start again unless they belong to the first list of species mentioned above.

    Generally speaking plastic pots are better for water retention than clay as the latter lose water via evaporation through the pot itself. Try standing the pots in a pot saucer in summer, if you forget to water there will be enough retained in the saucer to keep the plant going for a day or two. If you use pot saucers, remember to remove them during the winter or the plant is likely to become waterlogged.

    As mentioned in previous posts, some conifers will turn brown due to cold, dry winds in winter. Green Cupressus are not particularly susceptible but the gold varieties are. The only answer is to plant or position the trees/shrubs in an area sheltered from the north, north east and east.

    Watering through the foliage won't cause conifers to turn brown but a late frost on new growth will. Scorching due to watering over the foliage is more likely on soft leaved plants such as Begonias or Dahlias and it's best not to water any flowers (as opposed to leaves) in direct sunlight.

    Let's hope your plants recover.

    T.M

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    Posted
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland

    They sounds like dwarf false-Cypresses to me, in which case you should count your blessings that they appear to be dying, because it'll free the pots up for something nice.

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    Posted
  • Location: Taunton, Somerset
  • Location: Taunton, Somerset

    Hi Folks

    OON – what a good comment. The Government are actually doing their best to stamp the bloody things out, aren’t they? (Well, as hedging, anyway!) :)

    TM – excellent! Do you want a job at our local Garden Centre ‘cos the monkeys there all need shooting! :)

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    Posted
  • Location: Portland, Dorset
  • Weather Preferences: Mixed winters and springs, thundery summers and meditteranean autumns
  • Location: Portland, Dorset
    Hi Folks

    OON – what a good comment.  The Government are actually doing their best to stamp the bloody things out, aren’t they? (Well, as hedging, anyway!)  :lol:

    TM – excellent!  Do you want a job at our local Garden Centre ‘cos the monkeys there all need shooting!  :D

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Agreed!

    I'd much rather grow a nice Acer, Camellia or a Hosta in a pot in the shade, and pots of Lavender in the sun.

    The only heging conifer I like is the western red cedar, for it's delicious apple scent and shiny green leaflets. As a specimen conifer, I'd go for the deciduous larch for it's awesome autumn hues.

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    Guest *Ice*
    Agreed!

    I'd much rather grow a nice Acer, Camellia or a Hosta in a pot in the shade, and pots of Lavender in the sun.

    The only heging conifer I like is the western red cedar, for it's delicious apple scent and shiny green leaflets. As a specimen conifer, I'd go for the deciduous larch for it's awesome autumn hues.

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Yeah,like im gonna know what they are! :lol: :D:D

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    Posted
  • Location: Portland, Dorset
  • Weather Preferences: Mixed winters and springs, thundery summers and meditteranean autumns
  • Location: Portland, Dorset
    Yeah,like im gonna know what they are! :D   :D   :D

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    :D I'll give you some descriptions when time permits, over the weekend. :)

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    Posted
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral
  • Weather Preferences: Summer: warm, humid, thundery. Winter: mild, stormy, some snow.
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral

    I's love to give advice, but I hate conifers, they are one of the more boring species in my opinion

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