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The Eagle
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Posted
  • Location: Co Dublin, Ireland
  • Location: Co Dublin, Ireland

    Hi all

    In 1947/48 and 48/49 were so vicious apparently we got our worst winter on record with unrivalled low temperatures. At Sligo the temp low one night in Jan 49 was -19.1C and also -19.6C at Glasnevin in Dublin. Daytime temps rarly made it above 3C. And relations have said it snowed through till June that year (49)!!!The snow was so deep it would have covered ppls front doors. :D I dont think weve come near that since but i might be wrong :angry:

    post-3922-1126368871.gif

    Edited by Darkman
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    Posted
  • Location: Portland, Dorset
  • Weather Preferences: Mixed winters and springs, thundery summers and meditteranean autumns
  • Location: Portland, Dorset

    Hi Darkman,

    Apparently, the severe spell lasted from 22nd January to around 7th March. The previous weeks had been fairly average, so I've read.

    In the severe period (above), I read that winds were almost continuously easterly - and snow fell in some part of Britian every day during that period. Major snowstorms occurred on a regular basis, as occluded Atlantic depressions moved slowly over southern areas.

    My Grandfather tells of snow several feet deep, with severe drifts as high as 12 feet!

    I also read that March 1947 was the wettest March on record in England and Wales, and the coldest of the 20th century in Scotland.

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    Posted
  • Location: Dublin, ireland
  • Weather Preferences: Snow , thunderstorms and wind
  • Location: Dublin, ireland

    Hi Dakman,

    I dont know whether you have seen this site. It give a great account of this rare winter in the UK. A great read.

    Of course we were similarly affected here in Ireland.

    http://www.winter1947.co.uk/

    Regards,

    John

    Edited by John Cox
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    Posted
  • Location: Portland, Dorset
  • Weather Preferences: Mixed winters and springs, thundery summers and meditteranean autumns
  • Location: Portland, Dorset

    Cheers John, I 've had a little look - and will look at more of the articles on that site tomorrow. The 'Halesowen' article was extremely interesting.

    Many thanks.

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    Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam

    Here's the short article I wrote about the severe winter of 1947

    The Winter of 1946-47 was the snowiest winter of the 20th Century and is widely believed to be the snowiest winter since 1813-14 even surpassing the winter of 1878-79. The winter struck at a time when the country was recovering from the aftermath of World War II and many essential items were rationed. The CET for the winter was 1.1C

    The severest spell of the winter struck during the third week of January. Up to that point, January was largely mild and unsettled, although there was a brief cold interlude around the 9th with some snow. A major change in the weather occurred on the 20th as high pressure migrated to northern Scandinavia allowing a cold NEly flow across the UK bringing with it snow showers and night time frosts. These conditions continued until the end of the month with subtle changes as the winds shifted to a southeasterly direction. Many areas had a snow cover which was increasing in depth up to 30cm in places in the south and this drifted in the strong wind. Temperatures were close to freezing and the cold and snowy conditions were already causing chaos with power cuts and disruption to transport.

    February was very severe with very low maxima, frequent snowfalls, freezing rain events, blizzards, drifting snow and severe frosts. The country was on it's economic knees. 4 million workers were made idle by power cuts to industries as coal trains could not get to power stations by deep drifts on the railway lines. Many villages and towns were cut off by drifting snow such as Buxton and Bridlington. The blizzards in the Channel caused chaos with shipping due to very low visibilties, gales and driving snow. Worst still, the fishing industry was crippled as vessels were forced to stay in harbour and one of the few food items that was not rationed, fish, became scarce. The disruption to road transport was huge. The Great North Road or A1 was blocked for 22 miles by 10 foot drifts and during one of the worst blizzards, 300 roads were blocked and up to 15 towns were cut off.

    With pressure high to the north of the UK, low pressure systems took a more southerly track often over northern France or the Channel. The UK was mostly left in the cold sector of these lows but there was very occasional thaws in the extreme south. These lows brought strong to gale force easterly winds and heavy snowfalls with drifting snow. The coldest spell came around the 11th as high pressure was over Scandinavia and this allowed a very cold easterly flow across the UK which lasted to about the 23rd. Maxima were subzero during this period and with virtually no sun, it was very bleak. The NW of Scotland, sheltered from the easterly favoured very well with a lot of sunny and dry weather.

    Many areas were completely snow covered throughout the whole of February and depths of snow were phenomenal, up to 1 to 2 feet of level snow with drifts well in excess of this. It wasn't until the end of the month, when there were clearer skies that very low minima were recorded over the deep snow cover like -21C at Woburn, -19C at Luton, -16C at Rye and -11C at Dungeness. The CET for February was -1.9C, the coldest February in the CET records.

    The severe weather continued into March with even greater ferocity. There were record low March minima with temperatures down to < -20C in a number of places. On the 6th, a low moved through the English Channel producing one of the worst blizzards of the 20th century over England and Wales. The storm lasted for 48 hours with heavy snow, blizzards, gale force easterlies and even in the extreme south freezing rain. The heavy drifting snow caused chaos to transport with many areas either paralysed or snowbound. There was a lull with further severe frosts and very low minima down to -20C in places. The next low moved in and this took a more northerly track and this allowed a thaw into the south but to the north, the fierce blizzards continued. It wasn't until the 16th, that the milder weather finally broke through to all areas. The subsequent thaw was to create devastating problems of its own.

    Edited by Mr_Data
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    Posted
  • Location: Co Dublin, Ireland
  • Location: Co Dublin, Ireland
    Hi Dakman,

    I dont know whether you have seen this site. It give a great account of this rare winter in the UK. A great read.

    Of course we were similarly affected here in Ireland.

    http://www.winter1947.co.uk/

    Regards,

    John

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Hi all,

    Thats a great read John, Cheers. It would make you wonder wether we would have the capability to go through a winter like that today without sustaining harsh economic consequences??? Truly a remarkable set of synoptics that year :) I want snowey weather this year but not as harsh as that!! :)

    Hi Breezy i get the info from my grandparents too, some very interesting stories indeed :)

    Also an intiguing article Mr Data :)

    Edited by Darkman
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    Posted
  • Location: Dublin, ireland
  • Weather Preferences: Snow , thunderstorms and wind
  • Location: Dublin, ireland
    Here's the short article I wrote about the severe winter of 1947

    The Winter of 1946-47 was the snowiest winter of the 20th Century and is widely believed to be the snowiest winter since 1813-14 even surpassing the winter of 1878-79. The winter struck at a time when the country was recovering from the aftermath of World War II and many essential items were rationed. The CET for the winter was 1.1C

    The next low moved in and this took a more northerly track and this allowed a thaw into the south but to the north, the fierce blizzards continued. It wasn't until the 16th, that the milder weather finally broke through to all areas. The subsequent thaw was to create devastating problems of its own.

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Hi Mr Data,

    A brilliant read. Thanks a million.

    John

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    Posted
  • Location: Dublin, ireland
  • Weather Preferences: Snow , thunderstorms and wind
  • Location: Dublin, ireland
    Hi all,

    Thats a great read John, Cheers. It would make you wonder wether we would have the capability to go through a winter like that today without sustaining harsh economic consequences??? Truly a remarkable set of synoptics that year :)   I want snowey weather this year but not as harsh as that!! :huh:

    Hi Breezy i get the info from my grandparents too, some very interesting stories indeed :)

    Also an intiguing article Mr Data :)

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Hi darkman,

    I suppose the chances of getting such a winter are nearly nil.

    However, when the NAD shutdown eventuall happens, 1947 will probably pale into insignificance.

    Breezy Brum and darkman..... Im glad you enjoyed the read as much as I did.

    Regards,

    John

    John

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    Posted
  • Location: Co Dublin, Ireland
  • Location: Co Dublin, Ireland
    Hi darkman,

    I suppose the chances of getting such a winter are nearly nil.

    However, when the NAD shutdown eventuall happens, 1947 will probably pale into insignificance.

    Breezy Brum and darkman..... Im glad you enjoyed the read as much as I did.

    Regards,

    John

    John

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Hi John,

    I think this synoptic says it all:

    post-3922-1126616285_thumb.png

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    Posted
  • Location: Co Dublin, Ireland
  • Location: Co Dublin, Ireland
    Could somebody tell me what the weather was like for the xmas of 1989.

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Looks to have been a chilly northwesterly probrably with wintry showers in the west and north.

    Does anyone know of any significant natural event i.e volcanic eruptions.....that happened around this period to cause such a cold series of winters? :huh:

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    Posted
  • Location: Dublin, ireland
  • Weather Preferences: Snow , thunderstorms and wind
  • Location: Dublin, ireland
    Hi John,

    I think this synoptic says it all:

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Hi Darkman.

    Perfect,

    This winter perhaps??

    John

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    Posted
  • Location: Dublin, ireland
  • Weather Preferences: Snow , thunderstorms and wind
  • Location: Dublin, ireland
    I wait in hope :(

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Your hopes will be fulfilled. :):)

    I am sure of that. (You are a lot younger that I) NAD shutdown!!

    John

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    Posted
  • Location: Co Dublin, Ireland
  • Location: Co Dublin, Ireland
    Your hopes will be fulfilled. :(   :)

    I am sure of that. (You are a lot younger that I) NAD shutdown!!

    John

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Have you noticed the string of sustained northerly incursions the gfs is hinting at for the end of this month?

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    Posted
  • Location: Dublin, ireland
  • Weather Preferences: Snow , thunderstorms and wind
  • Location: Dublin, ireland
    Have you noticed the string of sustained northerly incursions the gfs is hinting at for the end of this month?

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Hi Darkman,

    I totally agree.

    The problem I have is that I have been only looking carefully at the GFS for the last nine months.

    To me the synoptices have genarally changed. But I need to get an update from more experienced people on this site like TM, Paul Carfoot and Steve Murray, WIB. to name a few,

    Can any of you guys give an opinion on this?

    Off to bed. Will catch up in the morning. nite.

    John

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    Posted
  • Location: Co Dublin, Ireland
  • Location: Co Dublin, Ireland
    Hi Darkman,

    I totally agree.

    The problem I have is that I have been only looking carefully at the GFS for the last nine months.

    To me the synoptices have genarally changed. But I need to get an update from more experienced people on this site like TM, Paul Carfoot and Steve Murray, WIB.  to name a few,

    Can any of you guys give an opinion on this?

    Off to bed. Will catch up in the morning. nite.

    John

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Nite then........ive got 1947 on the brain now. Birrrrrrr (you know that town in Offaly) :(

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    Posted
  • Location: Dublin, ireland
  • Weather Preferences: Snow , thunderstorms and wind
  • Location: Dublin, ireland
    Nite then........ive got 1947 on the brain now. Birrrrrrr (you know that town in Offaly) :(

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Hi Darkman,

    I certainly do.

    To all our UK members the town of Birr in Ireland is one of the coldest spots in this country.

    John

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    Posted
  • Location: Lincoln, Lincolnshire
  • Weather Preferences: Sunshine, convective precipitation, snow, thunderstorms, "episodic" months.
  • Location: Lincoln, Lincolnshire

    Seems like there is some confusion between the winters of 1946/47, 1947/48 and 1948/49 here!?

    1946/47 was the famous one, with high pressure generally situated between Greenland and Scandinavia during February and March feeding in mostly easterly, and occasionally northerly, winds. Apparently the easterlies during that winter were unusually productive in terms of the precipitation output over the North Sea and from Atlantic frontal systems pushing against the block, widely giving the snowiest winter on record.

    1947/48 looks, from the charts, as if it could have been fairly snowy at times, but nothing remarkable. Some fairly beefy looking returning polar maritime incursions might have given Ireland some snow events.

    1948/49 looks likely to have been mostly snowless, although the returning polar maritime incursion posted from the beginning of January 1949 looks pretty good.

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    Posted
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
    I was told by my mother that after the cold winter, with the harbour freezing over,  that the summer of '47 was very hot

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    correct, certainly from July into August for most areas.

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    • 3 weeks later...
    • 8 months later...
    Posted
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet

    Here are the charts from one of the worst blizzards in living memory.

    Rslp19470304.gif

    Rslp19470305.gif

    Rslp19470306.gif

    Is it true that Dartmoor recieved 200cm of level snow from that event????

    1947 was a great year, a winter with a CET of 1.1C, which is 3.4C below average and the second coldest in the past century followed by a summer with a CET of 17C, which is 1.4C above average and the eigth hottest summer in the past century.

    Mr Data, is the difference of 15.9C between the winter and summer CET's a record and do you know what the mid-January to mid-February CET was?????????

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    Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam
    Mr Data, is the difference of 15.9C between the winter and summer CET's a record and do you know what the mid-January to mid-February CET was?????????

    Yes it is a record. I don't think the CET for mid-January to mid February was as cold as what February 1947 turned out to be.

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    • 4 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet

    Does anybody know whether it was just the south of England which was affected by this extreme event??

    It is amazing to see a chart with a long chain of lows to the south of the British Isles.

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