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The Garden Is Looking Incredibly Summery, Is Yours?


fine wine

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Posted
  • Location: Great Yeldham, North Essex
  • Location: Great Yeldham, North Essex

With little or no frost so far this autumn, as well as unseasonably high daytime maxima, many of the gardens in my area are looking more like they do in summer rather than well into autumn. I cut the grass today, which has not stopped growing and took these photos of some of plants in the garden that have been thriving over the last few weeks in this damp, mild weather. My banana plants are growing nearly as fast as in summer and the datura are covered in 6" flower buds ready to open. I fear the garden may get a shock next week!

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Posted
  • Location: East Renfrewshire 180m asl
  • Location: East Renfrewshire 180m asl

Nice garden, looks nothing like mine,

Dead leaves all over the place, bare trees, dead plants, sodden grass. Feels and looks like autumn here anyway :rolleyes:

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Posted
  • Location: Llandysul, Ceredigion, Wales
  • Location: Llandysul, Ceredigion, Wales

No, I had record breaking garden this year, it was like a jungle out there sometimes...

Now it's looking very sorry for itself, rotting tomatoes strewn across the ground, ditto everything else. Good biodiversity :rolleyes:

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Posted
  • Location: Canterbury, Kent
  • Location: Canterbury, Kent

A lot of my geraniums are still out there doing well, although we did put some into the conservatory after a slight frost last Saturday. My fucsia's we're also thriving outside till last week but overall my garden still seems to be doing okay with my roses blooming and Agave yet to be covered. A lot of the Bendula trees around my area have still yet to shed all their leaves, although im not sure if thats normal but they seem reluctant to to lose its leaves.

WBSH

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Posted
  • Location: Portland, Dorset
  • Weather Preferences: Mixed winters and springs, thundery summers and meditteranean autumns
  • Location: Portland, Dorset

I've still got Fu$hsias in full flower, along with Hollyhocks.

Out and about, I've seen Escallonias still in full bloom, and passion flower in bloom too.

Back at home, the autumn Sedums are looking superb - rather than jaded as they often do by now. Our front lawn could also do with a cut. :rolleyes:

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Posted
  • Location: Great Yeldham, North Essex
  • Location: Great Yeldham, North Essex

WBSH I also have an Agave which I am planning on leaving outside this winter. I left 3 large Agave ferox out last winter and only a couple of the outer leaves were damaged, so you would be surpirsed what some Exotic looking plants can take.

The Yellow fruit is actually a Pumkin thats set in about the 2nd week of October. Its odd really, as my other pumpkin dies in Mid October whilst this one has continued to florish (especially as its got wetter).

I leave my banana plants outside all year round and protect the trunks with some old blankets during cold weather. They usually freeze right through the stem so not sure how they survive (althought they are a varitety from High up in Japan, Musa basjoo)

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Posted
  • Location: Canterbury, Kent
  • Location: Canterbury, Kent
WBSH I also have an Agave which I am planning on leaving outside this winter. I left 3 large Agave ferox out last winter and only a couple of the outer leaves were damaged, so you would be surpirsed what some Exotic looking plants can take.

Hi AF, I usually cover my Agave when their is a risk of frosts, but I sometimes take the cover off temporarily during warmer spells in late winter/early spring. Its currently thriving in its south facing position and have not felt the need to cover it up yet. However I may do so this weekend as the weather is yet to turn cold(er). But as you said they are pretty hardy species. Some need more care than others of course. I also have a Phonix palm, a trachycarpus and a few cordylines. Its amazing what you can grow huh!

WBSH

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Posted
  • Location: Warminster, Wiltshire
  • Location: Warminster, Wiltshire

Our St Johns Wort bush normally flowers twice, in June and September. This year it has kept producing flowers throughout October and now into November there are 2 new buds opening !

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Posted
  • Location: Great Yeldham, North Essex
  • Location: Great Yeldham, North Essex

WBSH, I have a simialr collection of Exotics and have been growing then succesfully outside since 1992. Some of my cordylines germinated from seed in 1996 have grown to 5m, only suffering damage to the centre spear in 2000/2001 (after which they brached). I have found larger Phoenix are much hardier, especially after 2 or 3 years outside, as the plant adjusts it growth accordingly to suit our cooler climate. I have also found Chamearops to be as hardy as Trachycarpus, as well as Butia 9not that weel known) The plant that produces perhaps the most impressive growths are the Musa Basjoo's, recovering from leafless in spring to 15ft tall by late October (see 3rd photo). These are root hardy, a bit like a standard perenial but the trunk can be maintained by wrapping in blankets when its really cold.

In regards to Agave, they can easily go down to temps as low as -15c, if kept dry. If there is any growth late in the season this can produce lush, succulent growth that is liable to frost damage so I fint the best way to keep these through the winter if to keep them dry or plant them in a very dry spot (i.e close to house, pretected from rain by eaves) Anyway, look forward to hearing about your plants.

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Posted
  • Location: Canterbury, Kent
  • Location: Canterbury, Kent
In regards to Agave, they can easily go down to temps as low as -15c, if kept dry. If there is any growth late in the season this can produce lush, succulent growth that is liable to frost damage so I fint the best way to keep these through the winter if to keep them dry or plant them in a very dry spot (i.e close to house, pretected from rain by eaves) Anyway, look forward to hearing about your plants.

No problem :whistling: ... I was suprised to find out that some types of Trachycarpus can survive temperatures down to -15c, as long as its kept away from damaging winds of course. So I can't see why a fully mature Agave can survive those sort of temps as well. That been said I still feel the need to cover them up when frosts are around the corner. I was thinking of covering up mine tonight actually as the temperature is currently +5c and dipping. But the forecasts are suggesting milder air is to move in later tonight, plus when I got home it was too dark to do it! So i'm releived to hear how that they can tolerate pretty low temps. How much can an 18 month old survive?

WBSH

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Posted
  • Location: London
  • Location: London

I have to say yes, apart from leaves falling more rapidly over the last week - there are still some flowers partly in bloom but the majority has died but the lawn (I use to be a Greenkeeper) is looking incredibly fresh, I treated the lawn a month ago with weed killer and the dandelions are still growing and so is the grass which will need cutting yet again!

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Posted
  • Location: Coalpit Heath, South Gloucestershire
  • Location: Coalpit Heath, South Gloucestershire

Grass still needs a weekly mow here :cold: . My geranium is still flowering in a shady east facing nook.

One very annoying thing is that my lobelias set so much seed that the bed that they were in is almost totally green with the seedlings. A good frost last night didn't get rid of the blighters. I must hope for a few more frosty nights.

One of my iberis(es?) is just starting to flower a tiny bit........it shouldn't be starting that until about February.

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Posted
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W

Grape vine in an unheated greenhouse refuses to go dormant and is still putting on new growth. Come on guys! This is Scotland, we're half way through November with only one light nip of frost so far.

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Posted
  • Location: Berlin, Germany
  • Weather Preferences: Ample sunshine; Hot weather; Mixed winters with cold and mild spells
  • Location: Berlin, Germany

And the leaves on the trees - I've been watching the trees outside my office window shed a leaf every 10 seconds or so... its mesmorising to watch! No wind at all, just one by one each leaf falls...

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Posted
  • Location: lowestoft, suffolk
  • Location: lowestoft, suffolk

The last few days have finally finished off the trees in my garden,

the 3 large populus tremulas have dumped their leaves,

the acer pseudoplatanuses are shrivelled and on the way down,

but :( the liquidamber( a proper botanical name) is I can safely say, magnificent,

there is nothing on the earth that goes that red,

but the neighbours apple trees still have apples.

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Posted
  • Location: Rochford, Essex
  • Location: Rochford, Essex

My garden still looks pretty good, a couple of trees that we planted this year have lost their leaves, but the rest of it is still going. We even had some roses flower over the weekend. My chickens have got the serious hump though and haven't laid any eggs in the last two weeks.

I've just taken on an allotment, and it is waist high in all those summer weeds. It looks like mid summer over there.

Ps. If anyone has any good suggestions for getting rid of them properly I'll be very pleased.

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Posted
  • Location: Warminster, Wiltshire
  • Location: Warminster, Wiltshire

I've went walking in the countyside this afternoon. Many trees are budding, which they probably started to do before the run of harsh frosts, while others are covered in catkins as well as leaves remaining from the past season.

Everything is overlapping.

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Posted
  • Location: Portland, Dorset
  • Weather Preferences: Mixed winters and springs, thundery summers and meditteranean autumns
  • Location: Portland, Dorset

I saw a Cotinus today, which normally looks gorgeous in late autumn, blackened by the recent hard frosts. :)

A couple of weeks back, I've never seen huge 6 ft Gunneras collapse so quickly either! :(

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Posted
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral
  • Weather Preferences: Summer: warm, humid, thundery. Winter: mild, stormy, some snow.
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral

Naturally Fine Wine, it would look summery with a banana tree, and canary palm. I strongly suggest you take them in though or cover them well if they are planted, as they will not survive the winter, mark my words.

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