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What To Plant On A Shaded Bank ?


Verglas

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Posted
  • Location: Douglas, Isle of Man
  • Location: Douglas, Isle of Man

    A question for the gardening gurus ;)

    I have a raised bank at the top of the garden which is shaded by jap maple trees and wooden fencing so that it doesn't get much direct sunshine.

    Currently we have joseph's coat, cotinus and a spireaa there, but they are getting tall and 'leggy' (until I got the hedge trimmer at it !).

    I am looking for suggestions as to what would do well and look good there, I hope the spireaa will produce new growth and be its usual cascade of white blossom again.

    I don't particularly like the broad leafed stuff you usually see stuck in shady corners, something with a bit of colour would be nice ! ( it must be dog friendly, non poisonous).

    Any suggestions welcome.

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    Posted
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W

    Japanese or flowering quince Chaenomeles japonica . Varieties can have white, red, pink, orange, and single or double flowers. Fruits are edible (though very tart) and can be used for putting some bite into jams or marmalade. Not the same as the normal fruiting quince, Cydonia vulgaris which will also do well in a shaded corner but doesn't have the same range of colours (the common variety is an orange/red) . Both types of quince have very fragrant fruit though cydonnia are larger. All are woody and fairly slow growing, safe, but some can have quite vicious thorns

    Another possible is Weigela, does well in semi shade and has masses of tubular blooms in shades of red and pink and there is also a variagated variety, Weigela florida 'Variegata'

    As long as it gets reasonable light and is well drained you could also try a Californian Lilac (ceanothus) masses of delicious honey scented blooms in late spring with small leaves that have an unmistakable sheen to them. There are low growing prostrate forms or others that will grow to 10ft so be sure to read the label. Normally known for their powder blue or lilac colours there are also white and pink forms (which I didn't know untill a couple of days ago!)

    Sure others will have their own favourites!

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    Posted
  • Location: Douglas, Isle of Man
  • Location: Douglas, Isle of Man

    Thanks Froggy

    I think that's something like one of the things I have there now, planted in about 1993 or so, I have it as Cydonia which I think is the same family.

    The spireaa is 'vanhouttei' ( I hadn't realised there were quite so many variants of spireaa when I saw more in gardens whilst on holiday).

    What I should have said is the height, anything wants to be no more than a couple of foot as the front of the bank is held back by a wall of 3 sleepers and is about 18" high.

    We have had flowering currant there in the past but it didn't do too well and was a bit tall.

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    Posted
  • Location: Mackworth, Derby. 94m/308.4 ft ASL
  • Location: Mackworth, Derby. 94m/308.4 ft ASL

    How about some hellebores or some hostas?

    Were you after bushes or flowering plants?

    You could have a colorful carpet of trout lilies, phlox, bluebells, and bleeding-hearts to announce the arrival of spring..........

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    Posted
  • Location: Douglas, Isle of Man
  • Location: Douglas, Isle of Man
    Verglas......is it dry shade or damp shade?

    I wouldn't call it exactly wet or dry, it is fairly moist as the rain from the higher ground on the garden behind soaks down this way, and before I built the wall of sleepers to level it up, used to wash the soil down onto the path. I suppose I'd call it free draining. It's a medium clay sort of soil.

    The bank is about 3ft front to back, with the two jap maples about a foot from the back but are well established being planted about 1992/3-ish, so are pretty well full grown. I have just had to do some pruning to stop them overhanging the garden so much as they were making an apple tree lean over sideways.

    I think I'm looking at bushy things that will stay rather than things that need replanting every year, or maybe multi-coloured leafy evergreens.

    The joseph's coat, spirea and cydonia that are there at present were just getting too high and have just had a 'haircut' with the hedge trimmer !

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    • 3 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland

    Only just seen this.

    Aucuba's would do really well, as would Mexican Orange (Choisya ternata "Sundance") or some vareigated Hollies. There are some lovely Ivies, or Fatshedera would be great.

    I live foliage plants....can you tell?

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