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New York very mild too


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Posted
  • Location: hertfordshire
  • Location: hertfordshire

Wow.... I was aware that the states would be becoming mild this week with practically all the snow due to have melted in Colorado by Thursday, But this is incredible...... 18-20oC in NY by The end of the week.....

http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/5day.shtml?world=0101

Accuweather say record breaking this coming Saturday

http://wwwa.accuweather.com/forecast.asp?p...01&metric=0

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Posted
  • Location: Kent
  • Location: Kent

Crikey - that is unbelievable! Mind you saying that, I sat out in the little conservatory thing we have on the back of the house (more like a lean to type thing) and it was lovely in the morning - I sat there in my shorts and T-SDhirt and Toby my cat sunned himself in the other chair!!!!

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Posted
  • Location: Canterbury, Kent
  • Location: Canterbury, Kent

It's very mild, but not unusually so.

Temperatures in the high teens even low twenties do happen in winter around the Eastern seaboard. They are ususally short warm bursts and you can find the temperature can drop to minus figures suddenly in a week!

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Posted
  • Location: Glasgow
  • Location: Glasgow

The same reason its mild in the states is the same reason its so mild over here in Europe as well. Due to the redicolously high AO currently +4, all the cold is locked up in the Artic. Its not till the AO drops back to Neutral or Negative figures will lower latitudes see any cold weather.

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Posted
  • Location: Reading/New York/Chicago
  • Location: Reading/New York/Chicago
It's very mild, but not unusually so.

Temperatures in the high teens even low twenties do happen in winter around the Eastern seaboard. They are ususally short warm bursts and you can find the temperature can drop to minus figures suddenly in a week!

You are correct, but what is unusual is the absence of the normal cold shots. I can only recall one really cold day so far this winter, and that was at the start of December. One ice day by this stage of January is very unusual. The total lack of snow is also about to become a new record, so it is unusually mild so far this winter.

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Posted
  • Location: Leigh On Sea - Essex & Tornado Alley
  • Location: Leigh On Sea - Essex & Tornado Alley
It's very mild, but not unusually so.

Temperatures in the high teens even low twenties do happen in winter around the Eastern seaboard. They are ususally short warm bursts and you can find the temperature can drop to minus figures suddenly in a week!

Temperature is just below 70c this morning in New York, and quite a few records are tumbling. The most noteworthy being the record for the lateness of no snow has been smashed. The last time it took this long to snow in New York was January 4th 1882, and with people sunbathing in Central Park there is no snow in the outlook.

Paul Sherman

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Posted
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland

Could it be good news for the world if parts of America start experiencing unseasonably mild winter weather on a regular basis? I notice though that by Wednesday the New York Post are predicting 2º.

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Posted
  • Location: Shrewsbury,Shropshire
  • Location: Shrewsbury,Shropshire
Could it be good news for the world if parts of America start experiencing unseasonably mild winter weather on a regular basis? I notice though that by Wednesday the New York Post are predicting 2º.

My thoughts exactly. May make them wake up to things.

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Posted
  • Location: Liphook
  • Location: Liphook

I just hope its not like that when i eventually take a long vacation out there.

After my studies hopefully I'll have amassed quite a large sum of money and probably the whole lot will be spent on a extended vacition and who knows maybe that year I'll finally be able to join Paul S in the plains after spending winter out there to experience proper snowfalls!

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Posted
  • Location: Reading/New York/Chicago
  • Location: Reading/New York/Chicago
My thoughts exactly. May make them wake up to things.

I always find this attitude a bit naive (I'm also aware it's in the wrong place, so apologies). I know the media in Europe like to make out that all Americans don't give a damn about Global Warming either because they don't believe it or because of an insular attitude, but it's not necessarily the case. It's all very well for Europeans to sit smugly saying that they care, but what exactly are they doing about it? Last I checked, emissions of greenhouse gasses continued to rise despite the hot air being emitted by the politicians.

In fact, most environmental legislation in the US is enacted at the State rather than Federal level. As a result, what Bush says is largely rhetoric which doesn't mean an awful lot. California has some of the strictest emission standards for cars of anywhere in the world. Most other states have enacted ordinances which have targeted high polluting industries. Don't just listen to Bush and his cronies: he no more represents all Americans than Blair does all British people.

As for heat, the weekend was beautiful. 72oF in the city, and I was able to stroll around Central Park in short sleeves. People were eating outside pavement cafes. Unbelievable for early January. A bit of a shame to have such a nice day though; it will probably be some time before we have another such beatiful day.

A short cold snap coming this week, followed by more mildness. A pattern change may finally be afoot upstream however; Arctic air finally spreads into the High Plains later this week and should eventually spread East. What we really need is a shift in the NAO; sound familiar?

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Posted
  • Location: Mytholmroyd, West Yorks.......
  • Weather Preferences: Hot & Sunny, Cold & Snowy
  • Location: Mytholmroyd, West Yorks.......
I always find this attitude a bit naive (I'm also aware it's in the wrong place, so apologies). I know the media in Europe like to make out that all Americans don't give a damn about Global Warming either because they don't believe it or because of an insular attitude, but it's not necessarily the case. It's all very well for Europeans to sit smugly saying that they care, but what exactly are they doing about it? Last I checked, emissions of greenhouse gasses continued to rise despite the hot air being emitted by the politicians.

In fact, most environmental legislation in the US is enacted at the State rather than Federal level. As a result, what Bush says is largely rhetoric which doesn't mean an awful lot. California has some of the strictest emission standards for cars of anywhere in the world. Most other states have enacted ordinances which have targeted high polluting industries. Don't just listen to Bush and his cronies: he no more represents all Americans than Blair does all British people.

So it's just their conspicuous consumption then?

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Posted
  • Location: Reading/New York/Chicago
  • Location: Reading/New York/Chicago
So it's just their conspicuous consumption then?

Something that you wouldn't find in Britain obviously :whistling: ...which is the point I'm trying to make!

Anyyyyywayy, back on topic. It looks like the eternal mildness of the US winter so far could be ending. A pattern change first identified as a possibility a few days ago looks to be bringing some much more seasonal temperatures to the High Plains and Midwest initially and then spreading further East. The ensembles for Minneapolis show the initial thrust of cold air which will be working into the Dakotas and Montana in the next 36 hours:

post-1957-1168379504_thumb.png

Much more seasonal and, more importantly, no ensemble members stray much above the -10oC line once the change has occurred. Obviously this in the longer term, but the Upper Midwest is slightly easier to forecast than the UK!

The cold air travels South East to Chicago where again we see little in the way of any movement North of -10 after January 16th:

post-1957-1168379704_thumb.png

Finally, New York. The colder air takes longer to arrive as you'd expect, and the temperatures are generally higher, but most members stay below -5oC after the 16th January. There is also a hint of the first snowstorm around the 22nd January, but I'd be very surprised if this came anywhere near verifying at that range! The important thing is the trend. The fact that a snowstorm is hinted at for the 22nd suggests that some blocking may finally occur over Canada as Nor'Easters which usually cause such snowfall are generally the result of an Low travelling up the West Atlantic and bumping into a Canadian High.

post-1957-1168379945_thumb.png

Finally, just look at all that cold air flooding South East; a cold-lover's dream!

post-1957-1168380161_thumb.png

With such a pattern change occurring upstream, maybe there is a glimmer of light in the UK?

Addit: The corresponding 500hPa chart shows the polar vortex over Baffin Island...

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