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Meteorology Books etc


Matty M

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Posted
  • Location: Dublin
  • Location: Dublin

    Seen as i have just over 2 months until i hopefully pursue my studies in the Scientific field.

    I was hoping to expand my faltering knowledge of the weather and meteorology.

    I was hoping some of you could point me towards some good titles.

    Regards :D

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    Posted
  • Location: Ski Amade / Pongau Region. Somtimes Skipton UK
  • Weather Preferences: Northeasterly Blizzard and sub zero temperatures.
  • Location: Ski Amade / Pongau Region. Somtimes Skipton UK
    Seen as i have just over 2 months until i hopefully pursue my studies in the Scientific field.

    I was hoping to expand my faltering knowledge of the weather and meteorology.

    I was hoping some of you could point me towards some good titles.

    Regards :D

    Hi Matty,

    The first book I bought was The Climate of Continents by WG KENDREW,there has been several editions. The second was Climatology by A Austin Miller. Both these books give a good insight into the basic grounding for Meteorological study. Dr Mason was the boss of the Met Office at my time of acceptance into the Met Office and these were at the time were a must read. Of Course Manleys Record of the English Climate is a must read. The Royal Meteorological Society has many back dated " Weather Magazines" to read and learn from.

    C

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    Posted
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks

    try the site of Roger Brugge or that for Martin Rowley, both may suggest titles that would help.

    It depends what you want to have a grounding in, those suggested by Paul(Carinthian) are certainly books I would recommend,if its more the forecast side then you need to look at other books.

    good luck, its a wonderful science, believe it or not it is a science.

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    Posted
  • Location: Ski Amade / Pongau Region. Somtimes Skipton UK
  • Weather Preferences: Northeasterly Blizzard and sub zero temperatures.
  • Location: Ski Amade / Pongau Region. Somtimes Skipton UK
    try the site of Roger Brugge or that for Martin Rowley, both may suggest titles that would help.

    It depends what you want to have a grounding in, those suggested by Paul(Carinthian) are certainly books I would recommend,if its more the forecast side then you need to look at other books.

    good luck, its a wonderful science, believe it or not it is a science.

    I will add to what John has to say. It is wonderful science, and if your are lucky you will get paid for enjoying what you are doing. I would say it is much harder than in our day to work in Meteorology. There was an opportunity to work from basic Weather Observer, known then as Assistant Scientific Officer to Forecasters if you had the abiilty to work hard and study. All I can add Matty, if you want to do it, go for it. It is hard study, but worth while.

    C

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    Posted
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks

    yes, I am the 'old style' basic entrant. No Uni training for me, night/day tech school after leaving Grammar school too early with the then basic 'O' levels, then over 20 years as the ASO Paul posts about before being selected for forecast training. I did what was the original Applied Meteorology Course at Shinfield Park( the then Met O College), along with about 10 others in the same 'boat' as me with another dozen or so, many being overseas students who had varying levels of degrees in Maths, Physics, meteorology.

    Bloody hard work for the first few months until we started to do the 'practical' and this was where our basic Met knowledge put us, in most cases, way ahead of the Uni people.

    In the end the standard at the Met O College for everyone is degree level but that does not mean all of us were Uni trained at the start.

    yes, a fabulous job awaits, so go for it.

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    Posted
  • Location: Ski Amade / Pongau Region. Somtimes Skipton UK
  • Weather Preferences: Northeasterly Blizzard and sub zero temperatures.
  • Location: Ski Amade / Pongau Region. Somtimes Skipton UK
    yes, I am the 'old style' basic entrant. No Uni training for me, night/day tech school after leaving Grammar school too early with the then basic 'O' levels, then over 20 years as the ASO Paul posts about before being selected for forecast training. I did what was the original Applied Meteorology Course at Shinfield Park( the then Met O College), along with about 10 others in the same 'boat' as me with another dozen or so, many being overseas students who had varying levels of degrees in Maths, Physics, meteorology.

    Bloody hard work for the first few months until we started to do the 'practical' and this was where our basic Met knowledge put us, in most cases, way ahead of the Uni people.

    In the end the standard at the Met O College for everyone is degree level but that does not mean all of us were Uni trained at the start.

    yes, a fabulous job awaits, so go for it.

    hI John,

    There is no doubt you learnt through the hard school and you took advantage of it alright.

    Way past my bedtime .

    Cheers

    C

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    Posted
  • Location: Dublin
  • Location: Dublin
    Hi Matty,

    The first book I bought was The Climate of Continents by WG KENDREW,there has been several editions. The second was Climatology by A Austin Miller. Both these books give a good insight into the basic grounding for Meteorological study. Dr Mason was the boss of the Met Office at my time of acceptance into the Met Office and these were at the time were a must read. Of Course Manleys Record of the English Climate is a must read. The Royal Meteorological Society has many back dated " Weather Magazines" to read and learn from.

    C

    Thanks alot guys, i will look into these :drinks:

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    • 1 month later...
    Posted
  • Location: Ski Amade / Pongau Region. Somtimes Skipton UK
  • Weather Preferences: Northeasterly Blizzard and sub zero temperatures.
  • Location: Ski Amade / Pongau Region. Somtimes Skipton UK
    I will add to what John has to say. It is wonderful science, and if your are lucky you will get paid for enjoying what you are doing. I would say it is much harder than in our day to work in Meteorology. There was an opportunity to work from basic Weather Observer, known then as Assistant Scientific Officer to Forecasters if you had the abiilty to work hard and study. All I can add Matty, if you want to do it, go for it. It is hard study, but worth while.

    C

    Any budding forecasters on this thread. I know quite a number are interested in a career. The Met Office are now actively recruiting for future forecasters. These position don't come around very often and competition is hot. Excellent 'A' LEVEL results in science or maths is desirable. Forecasting Foundation Training Programme is going to start in early 2008 in Exeter. This course will be one of the best inductions to forecasting in the world. John Holmes and I were lucky enough to enjoy this service back at Stanmore and Shinfield/ Reading. If you are good enough, and I know some of your are, go for it, nothing lost. Download an application on the Met Office web site.

    C

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    Posted
  • Location: Haverhill Suffolk UK
  • Weather Preferences: Thunderstorms, Squall Lines, Storm Force Winds & Extreme Weather!
  • Location: Haverhill Suffolk UK
    Any budding forecasters on this thread. I know quite a number are interested in a career. The Met Office are now actively recruiting for future forecasters. These position don't come around very often and competition is hot. Excellent 'A' LEVEL results in science or maths is desirable. Forecasting Foundation Training Programme is going to start in early 2008 in Exeter. This course will be one of the best inductions to forecasting in the world. John Holmes and I were lucky enough to enjoy this service back at Stanmore and Shinfield/ Reading. If you are good enough, and I know some of your are, go for it, nothing lost. Download an application on the Met Office web site.

    C

    Thanks for that carinthian. I will download an application today. Why not? :angry: I have very good A Level grades from 8 years ago.

    Mammatus B)

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    Posted
  • Location: Ski Amade / Pongau Region. Somtimes Skipton UK
  • Weather Preferences: Northeasterly Blizzard and sub zero temperatures.
  • Location: Ski Amade / Pongau Region. Somtimes Skipton UK
    Thanks for that carinthian. I will download an application today. Why not? :angry: I have very good A Level grades from 8 years ago.

    Mammatus B)

    Good Luck Mammatus,

    Give as much in-put as you can, including your forecasts for the local rag. The course will be hard, but not all highly qualified egg heads are good forecasters. Its something in your blood combined with how you integrate the science of weather.

    C

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