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Posted
  • Location: SE London
  • Location: SE London

does anyone know the magpie rhyme... one for sorrow, two for joy........ dont know the rest of it

oh and in reply to you Mr data, yes there seems to be an increased amount here in SE london this year. perhaps breeding has been increased with the unseasonally warm spring conditions we had???

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Posted
  • Location: SE London
  • Location: SE London
One for sorry

Two for joy

Three for a girl

Four for a boy

Five for silver

Six for gold

Seven for a secret never to be told

cheers and beers mate :o

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Posted
  • Location: Merseyside
  • Location: Merseyside

I thought magpies were a protected species?

The fantastic Mr D (I must say I am really enjoying reading his weather history articles) has provided the modern version... this is the magpie rhyme as taught to me by my Grandmama...

One for sorrow,

Two for mirth,

Three for a death,

Four for a birth,

Five for silver,

Six for gold,

Seven for a secret ne'er to be told.

It only differs on 3 and 4 really... but a significant difference nonetheless.

(But how does the bird know? How??)

We seem to have had more magpies round here this year but I put it down to the fact that the man over the road has hung several CD's in the tree in front of his house in a futile attempt to stop birds landing in it and pooping on his car.

Silly man... there's been more poop than ever before.

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i really dont see what the problem is. they are natural killers in a food chain (as we are) :o

So they kill other things... so what? You going to exterminate buzzards, eagles, red kites, lions, tigers, wolves too because they kill as well? They are a natural part of the ecosystem and the ecosytem of this country is well equipped to deal with these natural predators. How about we all exterminate blackbirds, robins etc too because they kill worms?

It's nature. Things kill each other. Not everything is pretty and fluffy and innocent.

At least they kill things just to survive and feed their young, unlke you who kills them for fun and sport.

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Posted
  • Location: Cambridgeshire Fens. 3m ASL
  • Location: Cambridgeshire Fens. 3m ASL

Had only seen one magpie around here until about 3 weeks ago. Then a family of 6 tried to move in, but our resident population of rooks who number about 50 decided they didn't want them as neighbours. Quite good fun to watch the squabbles.

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Posted
  • Location: SE London
  • Location: SE London
So they kill other things... so what? You going to exterminate buzzards, eagles, red kites, lions, tigers, wolves too because they kill as well? They are a natural part of the ecosystem and the ecosytem of this country is well equipped to deal with these natural predators. How about we all exterminate blackbirds, robins etc too because they kill worms?

It's nature. Things kill each other. Not everything is pretty and fluffy and innocent.

At least they kill things just to survive and feed their young, unlke you who kills them for fun and sport.

sorry but thats exactly what i was trying to say too. my response was actually directed at PeterF. sorry if it was mis-construed.

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Posted
  • Location: consett co durham
  • Location: consett co durham
So they kill other things... so what? You going to exterminate buzzards, eagles, red kites, lions, tigers, wolves too because they kill as well? They are a natural part of the ecosystem and the ecosytem of this country is well equipped to deal with these natural predators. How about we all exterminate blackbirds, robins etc too because they kill worms?

It's nature. Things kill each other. Not everything is pretty and fluffy and innocent.

At least they kill things just to survive and feed their young, unlke you who kills them for fun and sport.

So they kill other things... so what? You going to exterminate buzzards, eagles, red kites, lions, tigers, wolves too because they kill as well? They are a natural part of the ecosystem and the ecosytem of this country is well equipped to deal with these natural predators. How about we all exterminate blackbirds, robins etc too because they kill worms?

It's nature. Things kill each other. Not everything is pretty and fluffy and innocent.

At least they kill things just to survive and feed their young, unlke you who kills them for fun and sport.

its my job,maybe when you see newborn lambs having their eyes and tounges ripped out by this species.

you might think along the same line as me.

then again maybe not :rolleyes:

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Posted
  • Location: .
  • Location: .
here is a bit of info on magpies, for those that didnt know what killers they are.

http://www.birdcare.com/birdon/birdcare/ti...ts/magpies.html

The worst killers in the animal world are humans, so I'm not sure what point you are trying to make? They kill. So do a lot of creatures.

Magpies are wonderful imho. They are highly intelligent, as are many members of the Corvid family (crows, jays). I love the latin name for them pika pika - so onamatopaically apt! I often think a sign of their intelligence is how you rarely see them as roadkills, this despite their scavenging. They know how to hop it!

Magpie numbers have been steadily increasing for the past 40 years, so it is correct to note that there are more about.

By the way, you are not allowed to trap and kill magpies without licence ...

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Posted
  • Location: SE London
  • Location: SE London
its my job,maybe when you see newborn lambs having their eyes and tounges ripped out by this species.

you might think along the same line as me.

then again maybe not :rolleyes:

if thats supposed to shock, then i am afraid it doesn't. i shall remain of the opinion that magpies are a good example of "survival of the fittest"

how they survive may be in conflict with some people, but survive they do. WIB makes some good points in his post to which i am in agreeance with :)

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Posted
  • Location: Atherstone on Stour: 160ft asl
  • Location: Atherstone on Stour: 160ft asl
One for sorry

Two for joy

Three for a girl

Four for a boy

Five for silver

Six for gold

Seven for a secret never to be told

Eight's a wish

Nine's a kiss

Ten's a bird you must not miss

By the way, you are not allowed to trap and kill magpies without licence ...

:rolleyes::) Really ??

I've got a Larsen Trap set up in the orchard & this catches about 2 a week. When I moved here we were plagued with Mags (40+), but I've thinned them right out over the summer, consequently my garden's now full of songbirds instead - much nicer.

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Posted
  • Location: consett co durham
  • Location: consett co durham
if thats supposed to shock, then i am afraid it doesn't. i shall remain of the opinion that magpies are a good example of "survival of the fittest"

how they survive may be in conflict with some people, but survive they do. WIB makes some good points in his post to which i am in agreeance with :)

yip it certainly shocks me when i come across it.

survival of the fittest?,i take it you love rats aswell then :rolleyes:

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Posted
  • Location: .
  • Location: .
I've got a Larsen Trap set up in the orchard & this catches about 2 a week. When I moved here we were plagued with Mags (40+), but I've thinned them right out over the summer, consequently my garden's now full of songbirds instead - much nicer.

Shame on you. http://www.advocatesforanimals.co.uk/campa.../magpies01.html

Actually I think the legality is subject to debate. I know Mrs WIB couldn't trap them for study, even though she was then releasing them unharmed, without a special licence.

I think it's awful that someone kills magpies like that. Bet you don't even eat them, which is sole justification for killing a bird imho.

i take it you love rats aswell then :)

Everyone I know who has pet rats says they are really lovely creatures.

It's so easy to believe old wives tales, and promulgate old stories. It's because of this that we manage to wipe out entire species, often for no cause whatsoever. I remember the poor old chamaleons in Africa getting regularly clubbed over the head. Their ability to change colour made them suspicious to Africans, and they are being annihilated. There's really no need for such barbaric savagery in this day and age.

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Posted
  • Location: SE London
  • Location: SE London
yip it certainly shocks me when i come across it. survival of the fittest?,i take it you love rats aswell then :)
well just the pet ones. and living in inner london means we are never more then a few feet away from one anyway.

i am sorry but your linking of rats and magpies seems a bit tenuous. the thread was started to comment on the increasing population of (imo) an attractive and clever bird, to which i see no reason as to why they are scorned as vermin or pests. it has already been commented that they are in a food chain, albeit towards the top, and that they like other predators/hunters survive pretty well. the analogy of rats and magpies is like me saying you must like murderers and rapist as they are still humans after all. i am sorry but your opinions are exactly that, yours. i think the bird is attractive and clever and brightens a dull day here in london by been seen hopping and flying about. it has to eat, and its sole purpose (i presume) like every other animal on the planet, is to procreate. hence it needing to be fitter then its prey.

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Posted
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland

If I was a sheep farmer (if only), I'd be wary of Magpies and other crows and would take whatever measures I needed to protect my flock.

As for shooting for pleasure, I used to go beating on many pheasant shoots and whilst I always though it odd that grown men would rear birds just to shoot them, I never had, and still haven;t, got a problem with it. I'd much rather be a pheasant, reared to be shot at one day, roaming woodland and open coutryside than a battery chicken.

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Posted
  • Location: SE London
  • Location: SE London

yes, at least the pheasant has a chance of not been shot and achieving some sort of freedom. i am not against hunting/shooting/fishing in any way, so long as it is done for a need, and not just blatant malicous "target practice"

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