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The Tay Bridge Disaster


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Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam

    The Tay Bridge disaster is probably Britain's most infamous rail disaster. Exactly what happened that fateful evening of the 28th December of 1879, we will probably never know but we do know that the weather was severe with strong gales blowing down the Firth of Tay at the time of the disaster. It has been suggested that up to 3 waterspouts struck the bridge just before the train was crossing. We also know the bridge was poorly constructed and had been weakened from previous gales.

    Did waterspouts/tornados ultimately caused the disaster? And is this Britain's worst tornadic disaster that we know of as has been suggested by earlier editions of the Guinness Book of Records?

    Here is the 30th December 1879 edition of the Times

    taya.jpg

    tayb.jpg

    tayc.jpg

    tayd.jpg

    taye.jpg

    tayl.jpg

    tayg.jpg

    tayh.jpg

    tayi.jpg

    A couple of photos of the remains of the Tay Bridge

    taybridge_collapse.jpg

    taybridge54.gif

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    Posted
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland

    In addition to the lives lost that night, the weather also has to answer for perhaps the worst poem ever written. Apologies for bringing this up yet again, but it really is that bad, although you can't argue with the last two lines...wise words indeed.

    Beautiful Railway Bridge of the Silv'ry Tay!

    Alas! I am very sorry to say

    That ninety lives have been taken away

    On the last Sabbath day of 1879,

    Which will be remember'd for a very long time.

    'Twas about seven o'clock at night,

    And the wind it blew with all its might,

    And the rain came pouring down,

    And the dark clouds seem'd to frown,

    And the Demon of the air seem'd to say-

    "I'll blow down the Bridge of Tay."

    When the train left Edinburgh

    The passengers' hearts were light and felt no sorrow,

    But Boreas blew a terrific gale,

    Which made their hearts for to quail,

    And many of the passengers with fear did say-

    "I hope God will send us safe across the Bridge of Tay."

    But when the train came near to Wormit Bay,

    Boreas he did loud and angry bray,

    And shook the central girders of the Bridge of Tay

    On the last Sabbath day of 1879,

    Which will be remember'd for a very long time.

    So the train sped on with all its might,

    And Bonnie Dundee soon hove in sight,

    And the passengers' hearts felt light,

    Thinking they would enjoy themselves on the New Year,

    With their friends at home they lov'd most dear,

    And wish them all a happy New Year.

    So the train mov'd slowly along the Bridge of Tay,

    Until it was about midway,

    Then the central girders with a crash gave way,

    And down went the train and passengers into the Tay!

    The Storm Fiend did loudly bray,

    Because ninety lives had been taken away,

    On the last Sabbath day of 1879,

    Which will be remember'd for a very long time.

    As soon as the catastrophe came to be known

    The alarm from mouth to mouth was blown,

    And the cry rang out all o'er the town,

    Good Heavens! the Tay Bridge is blown down,

    And a passenger train from Edinburgh,

    Which fill'd all the peoples hearts with sorrow,

    And made them for to turn pale,

    Because none of the passengers were sav'd to tell the tale

    How the disaster happen'd on the last Sabbath day of 1879,

    Which will be remember'd for a very long time.

    It must have been an awful sight,

    To witness in the dusky moonlight,

    While the Storm Fiend did laugh, and angry did bray,

    Along the Railway Bridge of the Silv'ry Tay,

    Oh! ill-fated Bridge of the Silv'ry Tay,

    I must now conclude my lay

    By telling the world fearlessly without the least dismay,

    That your central girders would not have given way,

    At least many sensible men do say,

    Had they been supported on each side with buttresses,

    At least many sensible men confesses,

    For the stronger we our houses do build,

    The less chance we have of being killed.

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    Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam
    In addition to the lives lost that night, the weather also has to answer for perhaps the worst poem ever written. Apologies for bringing this up yet again, but it really is that bad, although you can't argue with the last two lines...wise words indeed.

    Beautiful Railway Bridge of the Silv'ry Tay!

    Alas! I am very sorry to say

    That ninety lives have been taken away

    On the last Sabbath day of 1879,

    Which will be remember'd for a very long time.

    Awful and not even correct. Even the Times says 75 lives and no more was believed to have been lost. He must have wrote that the day after. :nea:

    ....and his middle name was Topaz?! :bad:

    Edited by Mr_Data
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    Posted
  • Location: New York City
  • Location: New York City
    Awful and not even correct. Even the Times says 75 lives and no more was believed to have been lost. He must have wrote that the day after. :nea:

    Interesting paper cuttings, do you have a room full of backlogged Times'?

    You should read some of his other poems if you think that is bad... although his stories about his travels are funny, a bit like Mr Bean.

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    • 2 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Atherstone on Stour: 160ft asl
  • Location: Atherstone on Stour: 160ft asl
    In addition to the lives lost that night, the weather also has to answer for perhaps the worst poem ever written. Apologies for bringing this up yet again, but it really is that bad, although you can't argue with the last two lines...wise words indeed.

    Beautiful Railway Bridge of the Silv'ry Tay!

    Alas! I am very sorry to say

    That ninety lives have been taken away

    On the last Sabbath day of 1879,

    Which will be remember'd for a very long time.

    'Twas about seven o'clock at night,

    And the wind it blew with all its might,

    And the rain came pouring down,

    And the dark clouds seem'd to frown,

    And the Demon of the air seem'd to say-

    "I'll blow down the Bridge of Tay."

    When the train left Edinburgh

    The passengers' hearts were light and felt no sorrow,

    But Boreas blew a terrific gale,

    Which made their hearts for to quail,

    And many of the passengers with fear did say-

    "I hope God will send us safe across the Bridge of Tay."

    But when the train came near to Wormit Bay,

    Boreas he did loud and angry bray,

    And shook the central girders of the Bridge of Tay

    On the last Sabbath day of 1879,

    Which will be remember'd for a very long time.

    So the train sped on with all its might,

    And Bonnie Dundee soon hove in sight,

    And the passengers' hearts felt light,

    Thinking they would enjoy themselves on the New Year,

    With their friends at home they lov'd most dear,

    And wish them all a happy New Year.

    So the train mov'd slowly along the Bridge of Tay,

    Until it was about midway,

    Then the central girders with a crash gave way,

    And down went the train and passengers into the Tay!

    The Storm Fiend did loudly bray,

    Because ninety lives had been taken away,

    On the last Sabbath day of 1879,

    Which will be remember'd for a very long time.

    As soon as the catastrophe came to be known

    The alarm from mouth to mouth was blown,

    And the cry rang out all o'er the town,

    Good Heavens! the Tay Bridge is blown down,

    And a passenger train from Edinburgh,

    Which fill'd all the peoples hearts with sorrow,

    And made them for to turn pale,

    Because none of the passengers were sav'd to tell the tale

    How the disaster happen'd on the last Sabbath day of 1879,

    Which will be remember'd for a very long time.

    It must have been an awful sight,

    To witness in the dusky moonlight,

    While the Storm Fiend did laugh, and angry did bray,

    Along the Railway Bridge of the Silv'ry Tay,

    Oh! ill-fated Bridge of the Silv'ry Tay,

    I must now conclude my lay

    By telling the world fearlessly without the least dismay,

    That your central girders would not have given way,

    At least many sensible men do say,

    Had they been supported on each side with buttresses,

    At least many sensible men confesses,

    For the stronger we our houses do build,

    The less chance we have of being killed.

    A bit harsh OON, I like this one !!

    What was his name, was it McGonagall something or other ??

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