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Lightning Strike on Anemometer


Dr_G

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Guys,

Just been fitting my Davis anemometer / weather vane to a ridge tile. I was wondering if this is really a good idea? What happens if it gets struck by lightning? By necessity it needs to be high up, but it isn't earthed, so what do you do for safety?

Has anyone any experience of this?

Thanks,

Garth.

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Posted
  • Location: Douglas, Isle of Man
  • Location: Douglas, Isle of Man

    is there anything higher than it ?, is it a wired device or wireless ? and if you are in a risk area

    The ideal lightning protection would involve a copper strip running down to a good ground earth, but are there any other tv aerials in the area, and are they earthed, have they ever been struck by lightning, it may rationalise the risk to your wx station if it needs any protection or not

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    Posted
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland

    You could use an optical isolater (like I did, but for different reasons) which basically break the connection with the ground. I think it would have to go between the console and the computer, but it would still offer the same protection.

    The one I used is http://www.amplicon.co.uk/Data-Comms/produ...-Rover-3490.cfm. Horrendously expensive, but short of a lightning conductor, I can't think of another way. I'm not sure how conductive the anemometer would be though.

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    Guys,

    I think my house is the tallest building in the immediate area, apart from the church which is about 200 metres down the road, and a few poplar trees accross the road. My neighbours house was struck by lightning about 7 years ago. Strange because it struck the apex of his roof, nothing metallic. It cracked several stones though. but I've never heard of any other lightning strikes in the area before or since that.

    Maybe I should tell my neighbour to get a lightning conductor then - just being neighbourly! Or maybe I should get the system itemised on my house insurance. I think if the anemometer pole got struck, it would fry everything connected to or near to the cables irrespective if there was an optical isolator or not. I reckon that the lightning would just arc straight through whatever is in its path (anemometer, ISS, Console).

    Cheers,

    Garth.

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    Posted
  • Location: Swallownest, Sheffield 83m ASL
  • Location: Swallownest, Sheffield 83m ASL

    It's a tough call.. Do you put up a lightning conductor and encourage a lightning strike or not?

    My mate has a 60ft tower for his beam antenna. It's on the top of a hill and has been there 30 years. Not once has it been struck. Of course the risk is there but it sort of shows the odds a little.

    I'd put it up there and just add it to your insurance.. :)

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    Posted
  • Location: Western Isle of Wight
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, Storm, anything loud and dramatic.
  • Location: Western Isle of Wight

    In some parts of Romania they put up groups of tall steel poles on hills near villages, on asking the locals I found they were for attracting the lightning to the poles and not the villages :)

    Based on the above, I lightheartedly I suggest: A. That you check how good the church is as a lightning conductor, if not the damper and taller the church the better :) , or B. Cover one of the poplars in tinfoil as that would probably be cheaper than getting a proper one fitted to your house :)

    Regards,

    Russ

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