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Best place to put the senser for the weather station to pick up.


skipper

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Hi it been a long time and not been on much but i am intreasted in the weather and actualy just brought my self a weather station called. Lexibook Traditional Wooden Weather Station (wierless). What i want to know is that where would be the best place out side to put the senser. At the moment ive got it in the garage just to test it as ive only just got it today. I was woundering where the best place to put the senser out side would be as in the instructions it doesnt say and all it says is that its drip proof. So i was just woundering where the best place to put the senser for full time use in the garden?.

Thanks for any help.

PS Ive got a link to the website where ive brought it from if im alowed to post links

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Posted
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland

    I don't know what the sensor looks like, but I think the sensor should go somewhere out of full sun, yet not sheltered so it gets plenty of air moving past it. Under a tree would be ok, but not on a fence because the other side might heat up too much in the sun.

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    Posted
  • Location: Sheffield, South Yorkshire
  • Location: Sheffield, South Yorkshire

    I have mine on the wall Facing North. Doesnt get the sun and like OON says wants to be in the shade so it don't mess with termperature readings.

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    Well it still in the garage and just be for it started raining properly a couple of hours ago my weather station animated symbol starting flashing with clouds and rain. and now its raining. But still im going to put it out side for better results and proper temp reading.

    :D

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    Posted
  • Location: South Derbyshire nr. Burton on Trent, Midlands, UK: alt 262 feet
  • Weather Preferences: Extreme winter cold,heavy bowing snow,freezing fog.Summer 2012
  • Location: South Derbyshire nr. Burton on Trent, Midlands, UK: alt 262 feet

    hi Skipper,

    When I first started out with my observations I did position my thermometer sensor on the north wall of my house and thought my readings were fairly accurate at the time, so it wasn’t until I received a letter from a near by observer to say he noticed my temperature readings were constantly 2c to 3c above or below his met standard equipment, then I realised something was amiss. I have since built my own Stevenson Screen and my readings are now very comparable with official stations in my area.

    So from good experience I can tell you that a north-facing wall on a house in full shade will give fair results, but expect temperature anomalies of around 2c, even 3c.

    The problem is at night the house walls act like a storage heater releasing heat very slowly during the night. During the daytime, especially in summer the opposite problem occurs, as the north walls tend to be so much cooler during the heat of the afternoon.

    So the only real solution to this problem is a Stevenson Screen for accurate temperature readings, and even then the screen should be positioned well away from any building, hedges and overhanging trees.

    But if you can allow for the temperature anomalies the north wall will give you fair results.

    What ever you decide, i hope you enjoy many years of weather watching.

    Paul

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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts
  • Weather Preferences: Rain/snow, fog, gales and cold in every season
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts

    I agree entirely with Paul's post above but would like to add that, if you can't afford a Stevenson screen or can't build one, there are mini screens available from companies such as Skye Instruments. These are, in effect, miniature Stevenson screens made of white plastic and designed to house temperature/ humidity sensors.

    Mount the temperature sensor 4 feet above the grass in as open an area as possible. 4 feet is the Met Office standard height and you'd be amazed how much difference it can make to your readings if you mount the sensor much higher or lower. Also, try to avoid siting it over bare earth, concrete or tarmac.

    Happy observing.

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