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Posted
  • Location: Winchester, Hampshire ~ Southern Central!
  • Location: Winchester, Hampshire ~ Southern Central!

    Hello - I'm here to spam again! :)

    I am going to make a vegetable patch soon. I was thinking this weekend weather permitting! :)

    Any way it is roughly 3X5 metres in size. Currently it is a just a bit dirt patch with tons of weeds and stones on it. So a lot of work ahead!

    I am going to grow carrotts, brocalli, peppers, tomatoes and lettace. And some other seeds I have that I have forgotten what they are!

    If I can't get outside to do the patch tomorrow then I shall spend the day planting my seeds in my pots instead and labelling them. Is it bes to leave them in the cool of the garage or to bring them upstairs in a sunny window?

    Any one else doing their vegetables right now? How far are you? Is it a new patch?

    Here is a very quick and rubbish plan of how I woud like the garden. We shall we mainly concentrating on the area up top from the seating area up.

    post-1583-1204296084_thumb.jpg

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    Posted
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL

    Hi Beka.

    You can buy some mini greenhouses. We were bought one last year. Its only about 20cmx40cm at the base (perhaps 60cm tall), but you can put your potted seeds in to grow. You can then leave it outside, as it should ward off some frosts (although you could bring it in if you want during frosts).

    I would guess that outside will be best too, as it will of course increase the growth of the seeds.

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    Posted
  • Location: Ashford, Kent
  • Weather Preferences: Anything
  • Location: Ashford, Kent

    Tomatoes and pepper- use the little bio degradable pots (made of compressed compost) you can find them at the garden centre. Or even B&Q. Plant 3-4 seeds in each pot and cover with a thin layer of fine, seived compost. lay out the pots to fill a tray and water lightly. Leave in a warm place such as a window sill. When they have germinated and you have little plants (about 3-5 weeks) gently remove the weeker looking plants leaving the strongest one to grow on. You should now have one plant per pot. When each plant has grown to a height of about 4- 6 inches you can think about putting them out side, the little bioderadable pots can be planted diectly into the soil. Minimising the root disturbance.

    If you are planting toms or peppers outside they will benifit from some protection from the late frosts. So cover them with a cloche, one with optional ventilation is best. In May the weather should be warm enough to then grow on unprotected depending on your location. The most important thing is to watch the weather. If it looks like it's gonna be cold or very wet then make sure your plants are well protected.

    Outdoor peppers may struggle a bit in an unsheltered spot but the tomatoes should be fine, unless we get a summer like last year in which case they will find it tough. A mini greenhouse as mentioned by Chris is a great idea! Particularly for the peppers, just make sure that it has adequate ventilation for those hot days.

    Plant the other veg out directly, but you may want to wait a few more weeks for the best results, follow the directions on the back of the packet.

    Edit- Lettuce can be sown now. Start with one row start another row every 3 weeks for a continuous supply!

    Here's my veggie patch from last year. I've opted for raised beds. Good luck and let us know how it goes!

    100_0167.jpg

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    Posted
  • Location: Winchester, Hampshire ~ Southern Central!
  • Location: Winchester, Hampshire ~ Southern Central!

    Thank you everyone for the tips. Well we have been out in the garden for 2-3 hours today. Me and my sister that is!

    Here are the before (during) and after photos! We only managed to do about a 1 X 2 metre square.

    DURING:

    post-1583-1204394175_thumb.jpg

    post-1583-1204394218_thumb.jpg

    AFTER:

    post-1583-1204394256_thumb.jpg There was tons of rubble that we shoved to the left of the path! LOL.

    post-1583-1204395139_thumb.jpg

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    • 3 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland

    Depends if Beka can fit in the box you work in.

    I love vegetable gardens and would love nothing more than a nice walled Victorian kitchen garden. I think I'm going to have to make do with some raised beds this year though.

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    Posted
  • Location: Winchester, Hampshire ~ Southern Central!
  • Location: Winchester, Hampshire ~ Southern Central!
    Depends if Beka can fit in the box you work in.

    I love vegetable gardens and would love nothing more than a nice walled Victorian kitchen garden. I think I'm going to have to make do with some raised beds this year though.

    LOL!! I know very professional for a first attempt! Look how straight those lines are! :lol:

    I'm sure we could accomodate Wibsey somehow! I do need a teasmaid ...

    Off out to measure up. Am going to pop a row of veg the marigolds? Then another row etc. I recon I will have too much veg to grow in there!!

    Will pop a copy on here when I've done all the measurements and rows and things.

    Anyone know of a plotter online I could use?

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    Posted
  • Location: Canmore, Canada [4296ft] & North Kent [350ft]
  • Location: Canmore, Canada [4296ft] & North Kent [350ft]

    If you cant do it outside, its always fun to plant your seeds in a pot indoors

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    Posted
  • Location: Colchester, Essex, UK (33m ASL)
  • Location: Colchester, Essex, UK (33m ASL)

    Just noting you say you are going to do carrots, if the ground is very stony they may not do so well. If you do do carrots, put marigolds in between the rows to keep off carrot fly. Works well.

    Dont try swede, they are a field veg ideally.

    Toms and peppers you can always put into large pots or grow bags to leave space on the plot for other things.

    Brassicas (cabbage, sprouts, broccoli, etc) take up a lot of room but you can "catch crop" between them, lettuces, radishes etc.

    Pound per foot of row I guess you cant go wrong with runner beans!

    Dont forget spring onions, and leeks! Leeks are awesome straight from the garden and into the pot and maybe try a sweetcorn or two? Now there is a delight for those who like corn on the cob :lol:

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    Posted
  • Location: Orleton, 6 miles south of Ludlow
  • Location: Orleton, 6 miles south of Ludlow

    Good on you for getting into the veggies! Once you've had veg straight from the garden, there's no going back.

    Runner beans are very easy and prolific. You can leave them as late as May (or even very early June in Winchester) and plant directly into the soil. Corgettes are also very prolific and easy. Key here, is to allow plenty of space (1 sq metre per plant) as the plants get very large — but 1 plant will give loads of corgettes.

    You can plant parsnips, carrots, spring onions and lettuce direct into the ground now. Be patient with the parsnips and plant 3 seeds at each place you want a parsnip — they don't germinate very well. I planted mine 2 weeks ago, and they still haven't appeared, but that's normal. As another poster mentioned though, if you have stony ground, root veg may not be the best bet.

    Although it's tempting to squeeze things together, don't. Plants need space, light and air.

    Broad beans are another option, especially if your ground isn't too fertile. You can plant these direct into the ground too. If you don't want to have to support them, get a dwarf variety (Sutton, I think) — these grow to about 2 feet (60 cm).

    Another very prolific and easy veg are mange tout. When you see how many the plants produce it makes you wonder why they are so expensive in the shops. And, if you keep picking them, they will produce for about 4-6 weeks.

    A really good tomato that grows outdoors (even last summer) and gives really sweet fruit is Sungold — small orange tomatoes.

    Good luck!

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    • 2 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Winchester, Hampshire ~ Southern Central!
  • Location: Winchester, Hampshire ~ Southern Central!

    Update! We went out again today and dug up some more. *bleep* hard work I tell ya!We found some huge rocks and big bits of concrete. What the hell did the previous people bury there!? Keep expecting to find a body ...

    Any way piccie time.

    The rubble ...

    post-1583-1206663173_thumb.jpg

    post-1583-1206663420_thumb.jpg

    The work in slow progress ...

    post-1583-1206663805_thumb.jpg

    post-1583-1206663879_thumb.jpg

    The beginnings of the compost heap ...

    post-1583-1206663966_thumb.jpg

    post-1583-1206664052_thumb.jpg

    My sister hard at it ...

    post-1583-1206664306_thumb.jpg

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    Posted
  • Location: Hampshire Snow Hoper
  • Location: Hampshire Snow Hoper

    as a fellow hampshire gardener[my job]all veg garden tips usually at extortionate fees are yours at rock bottom prices ps it is blooming hard work you tell em lol

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    Posted
  • Location: Douglas, Isle of Man
  • Location: Douglas, Isle of Man

    your ground looks very stoney, it's often suggested for the first year to plant spuds, helps clear the ground of stones etc with the digging involved (when they are dig you still have time to plant out things for winter like the brassicas).

    When I was breaking in a new garden after the builders had left I dug in a lot of cheap grow-bags to give the soil some texture as it was very heavy clay and all the original topsoil had been cleared in the building process.

    Try things in pots where you can move them about or make a cold frame for delicate things (any sash windows in skips around your way ?) try beans on cane wigwams rather than rows as you're short of space

    Is the crate for the compost heap ?

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    Posted
  • Location: Maidstone
  • Location: Maidstone

    Hi i am looking for some advice. I love cabbage and cauliflour but when i tried to grow it last year i ended up with useless plants because of lots of green caterpillars. I tried picking them off spraying them but there were so many and they ruined my crop.

    Can anybody give me some advise as to how to stop this without dousing the plants with insectaside.

    Thanks

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and lots of it or warm and sunny, no mediocre dross
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl

    Morning folks, the easiest and most reliable way I've found to keep caterpillars off is to cover the crop with fleece or very, very fine mesh - holes small enough to keep the butterflies out.

    Stormforce - the garden's coming along a treat, well done you. Just one thing, the piccie of your compost heap looks as though you've put couch grass on the heap (broad leaved grass with long trailing roots) best burnt, not composted. Pernicious weeds such as couch and bindweed are best disposed of, not composted as the heat generated in a compost heap is rarely hot enough to kill them, every tiny piece of living root will then happily root and grow again when you spread the compost on the garden.

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    Posted
  • Location: Cambridge (term time) and Bonn, Germany 170m (holidays)
  • Location: Cambridge (term time) and Bonn, Germany 170m (holidays)
    Hi i am looking for some advice. I love cabbage and cauliflour but when i tried to grow it last year i ended up with useless plants because of lots of green caterpillars. I tried picking them off spraying them but there were so many and they ruined my crop.

    Can anybody give me some advise as to how to stop this without dousing the plants with insectaside.

    Thanks

    Either bring them inside or put them in a greenhouse. Every single year I grow herbs, the slugs devour them.

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    Posted
  • Location: Norton, Stockton-on-Tees
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and cold in winter, warm and sunny in summer
  • Location: Norton, Stockton-on-Tees

    I love growing fruit and veg in the garden. My garden is fairly small (12metres x 10metres) but I still have blackberrys, loganberrys, redcurrants, blackcurrants, strawberries, damsons, cherries, tomatoes, peas, herbs (rocket, sorrell, basil, thyme, rosemary), and about 5 kinds of lettuce. It's just a question of managing what little space you have in a garden. The toms are in hanging baskets, the strawbs are in a big planter, the lettuces are in a big sink in the corner and in a large wall planter, and the soft fruits are against the fences.

    I have tons of marigolds so I have no bother with aphids and the like. Only trouble I have is keeping the slugs under control, although going out at midnight with a torch and a bucket with salt in the bottom is very satisfying!

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    Posted
  • Location: Winchester, Hampshire ~ Southern Central!
  • Location: Winchester, Hampshire ~ Southern Central!

    So stoney! Bricks, concrete, rubble the lot. The whole plot seems to be dropping by several inches! It's a killer. Hard work and takes so long by yourself. Don't think i'll get any veg in the ground this year by the looks of how long its taking!

    Can I grow all my seeds now indoors and then plant them out in another month or so? I'm just so warey of time!!post-1583-1207742175_thumb.jpgpost-1583-1207742250_thumb.jpgHad to down tools so that Blacky could have some dinner I dug up for him!He scared the hell outta me! Landed on a fence post right behind my head and nearly landed on my head LOL. My hair got parted by the wind.post-1583-1207742327_thumb.jpgpost-1583-1207742369_thumb.jpg

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    Posted
  • Location: Colchester, Essex, UK (33m ASL)
  • Location: Colchester, Essex, UK (33m ASL)

    Sure you can sow the seeds indoors now. Most packets have a sow indoors directions as well as outdoors directly in the ground.

    I have loads of seedlings dotted around on the kitchen window sills and in the green house...

    Tomato

    Sweetcorn

    Basil

    Sage

    Brussels

    Cabbage

    Broccoli

    Pumpkin

    Runner Beans

    Marrow

    Sweet Pepper

    Parsley

    Leek

    Thyme

    Majoram

    is a few.

    :rolleyes:

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    Posted
  • Location: Winchester, Hampshire ~ Southern Central!
  • Location: Winchester, Hampshire ~ Southern Central!

    Ok the list of seeds to grow are thus:

    • Calendula's
    • Parsnips
    • Cabbage - Golden Acre Primo 2
    • Onion's
    • Carrots - Autumn King 2
    • Brussell Sprouts
    • Carrots - Early Nantes 5
    • Cabbage - Greyhound
    • Leeks
    • Tomatoes
    • Sweetcorn
    • Courgette
    • Broccoli - Purple
    • Broccoli - Sprouting
    • Spinage

    Obviously all that lot isn't going to fit in there so I think I will have to choose some and leave the rest or do in pots/troughs. Especially repeats like carrots and broccoli etc. I can do those next year instead.

    Right so out of that lot what can I safely seed indoors now and what prefers to be planted in the ground and left? I also have a cloche sp?? that my dad put up for me yesterday. It's only a small one. Stupid question but the hell do I do with it? LOL!!Do I shove my seeds in there? I have no greenhouse and my kitchen has no window seal and it is sheltered and faces north any way.

    Just been out to measure my plot again. It is an odd shape! Ok I have attached the exact measurements and plan for you all to laugh at!! :angry:

    post-1583-1208112082_thumb.jpg

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    Posted
  • Location: Cambridgeshire Fens. 3m ASL
  • Location: Cambridgeshire Fens. 3m ASL
    Ok the list of seeds to grow are thus:

    • Calendula's
    • Parsnips
    • Cabbage - Golden Acre Primo 2
    • Onion's
    • Carrots - Autumn King 2
    • Brussell Sprouts
    • Carrots - Early Nantes 5
    • Cabbage - Greyhound
    • Leeks
    • Tomatoes
    • Sweetcorn
    • Courgette
    • Broccoli - Purple
    • Broccoli - Sprouting
    • Spinage

    Obviously all that lot isn't going to fit in there so I think I will have to choose some and leave the rest or do in pots/troughs. Especially repeats like carrots and broccoli etc. I can do those next year instead.

    Right so out of that lot what can I safely seed indoors now and what prefers to be planted in the ground and left? I also have a cloche sp?? that my dad put up for me yesterday. It's only a small one. Stupid question but the hell do I do with it? LOL!!Do I shove my seeds in there? I have no greenhouse and my kitchen has no window seal and it is sheltered and faces north any way.

    Just been out to measure my plot again. It is an odd shape! Ok I have attached the exact measurements and plan for you all to laugh at!! :)

    Lettuce would be ideal to plant under a cloche. It keeps frost off and helps stop the birds stealing them.

    Sweetcorn needs to be planted in squares so a minimum of 4 of those

    You would be better off buying a few tomatoe plants if you have nowhere to grow them if this cold spring keeps going.

    Think about a cold frame to start plants in or one of those mini greenhouses.

    Most of the others can be planted into the ground as per instructions on the packet. Lettuce, Raddish, Spring onion can be grown in between the rows of maincrop vegatables.

    Leeks and carrots need a well prepared bed to plant in with no stones and nice and deep with plenty of organic stuff. Otherwise you will get curly carrots

    Coudn't see your drawing so can't comment where to plant what.

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    Posted
  • Location: Ashford, Kent
  • Weather Preferences: Anything
  • Location: Ashford, Kent
    Ok the list of seeds to grow are thus:

    • Calendula's
    • Parsnips
    • Cabbage - Golden Acre Primo 2
    • Onion's
    • Carrots - Autumn King 2
    • Brussell Sprouts
    • Carrots - Early Nantes 5
    • Cabbage - Greyhound
    • Leeks
    • Tomatoes
    • Sweetcorn
    • Courgette
    • Broccoli - Purple
    • Broccoli - Sprouting
    • Spinage

    Obviously all that lot isn't going to fit in there so I think I will have to choose some and leave the rest or do in pots/troughs. Especially repeats like carrots and broccoli etc. I can do those next year instead.

    Right so out of that lot what can I safely seed indoors now and what prefers to be planted in the ground and left? I also have a cloche sp?? that my dad put up for me yesterday. It's only a small one. Stupid question but the hell do I do with it? LOL!!Do I shove my seeds in there? I have no greenhouse and my kitchen has no window seal and it is sheltered and faces north any way.

    Just been out to measure my plot again. It is an odd shape! Ok I have attached the exact measurements and plan for you all to laugh at!! :)

    Morning Beka!

    Sorry, your plan hasn't come through very clear and it's difficult to see the detail but running through your list of wants here is some guidance.

    Tomatoes, sweetcorn and courgettes- These are not hardy and will need tyo be sown inside or under your cloche at least. Personally I would buy small plants from the garden center for the toms and courgettes as they will have a head start, plant them at the end of April or if the weather is still cool wait until May. The sweetcorn is dead easy, you can sow that yourself inside on a warm windowsill and then plant out in May, lant in blocks rather than rows as they need each other to pollinate. (edit-whoops just read that you don't have a windowsill. Ok pick a warm spot in your house to germinate them, then move to any windowsill or lighter area inside, They need warmth rather than bright light at this stage, then move under a cloch and then finally transplant outside)

    Cabbage, sprouts and broccoli- The cabbage can be sown now and will be ready to harvest in the late autumn, protect from caterpillers by inspecting daily and picking of the grubs. Or use an insecticide if your are not going organic!

    The Brocolli is a long term crop ie sow it now and it will be ready to harvest in the following spring. Personnally I would intercrop these with some lettuce or spinnach which would make best use of the space.

    Parsnips and Carrots- As Grewowl says, remove all the stones from the soil, sow thinly in rows by mixing half/half the seed with some sand. As they grow thin out the plants leaving about 10-15 cm space between. Autumn king is a great variety and will grow large! You can eat the later thinnings as baby carrots.

    Onions-I've never grown them but I think it is easier to grow from sets (little baby onions) which you can get now from garden centres.

    Leeks- Raise in little pots and then transplant into the bed when they are still small. Use a broom handleto make a hole in the ground and pop the baby leek into the ground, fill the hole with water and the leek will grow and expand to fill the hole.

    P.s a cloche is a protective cover, like a mini greenhouse, it can be used to protect the less hardy plants while they establish and the weather improves. Ventilated ones are better, remember to remove them if the weather is very good and pop them back over at night.

    My best advive is to get a simple book which explains exerything better, I use a book called the Pocket Vegetable Expert but I can't think who does it now, I will let you know later.

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    Posted
  • Location: Winchester, Hampshire ~ Southern Central!
  • Location: Winchester, Hampshire ~ Southern Central!

    Thank you chaps! I think I am probably worrying/obsessing so much as my patch is only half dug! So I hadn't planted my seeds until I knew it was done. Tomatoes i'm not worried about at all. The last 2 years I have popped then in a simple balcony box and tied to the balcony when we had the flat!

    I've just thought all my seeds can go in my South facing window in the bedroom. That will be very warm and fry them though LOL. Guess I just need to play around this year and see what does and what doesn't work. How far down do the stones need to be removed for the root veg? I've gown down a fork and spades depth. Do they need further?

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    Posted
  • Location: Ashford, Kent
  • Weather Preferences: Anything
  • Location: Ashford, Kent

    A spades depth is ok, but with autumn King being a big carrott it may grow a bit deeper than that but I wouldn't worry too much, enjoy your veggies and keep us posted on the progress!

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