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Classic Polar Low..?


NL

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Posted
  • Location: South Shields Tyne & Wear half mile from the coast.
  • Location: South Shields Tyne & Wear half mile from the coast.

    a classic polar low.? Satellite image took around 5-6am today.

    "copyright 2008 RSGB, University of Bern and NOAA"

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    Posted
  • Location: Saddleworth, Oldham , 175m asl
  • Weather Preferences: warm and sunny, thunderstorms, frost, fog, snow, windstorms
  • Location: Saddleworth, Oldham , 175m asl

    That would be great if it happened, what sort of snowfall rates could you expect if you were under one of those?

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    Posted
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
    LOL shame wishful thinking for me. One day in my dreams maybe

    all our dreams!

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    Posted
  • Location: Inbhir Nis / Inverness - 636 ft asl
  • Weather Preferences: Freezing fog, frost, snow, sunshine.
  • Location: Inbhir Nis / Inverness - 636 ft asl
    nope!

    If only that was your dose of Michael Fish Syndrome for your life, but we all know it isn't :rolleyes: . It's a shame the Atlantic is beginning to 'wake up', we might have been in with a chance.

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    Posted
  • Location: Upton, Northampton.
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, storms
  • Location: Upton, Northampton.

    Just out of interest... Has the UK ever been hit by a Polar Low? I heard that the Jan 28th 2004 Thundersnow event was a Polar Low but I don't think it was... Was it?

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    Posted
  • Location: Highland Scotland
  • Location: Highland Scotland

    Yes, Christmas Eve 1995. Hit NW Sutherland between 3 and 4pm not long before night fall. Absolutely hammered Shetland leaving roads under 30ft drifts.

    Was up a hill only a couple of 100ft above sea level in the far North West sledging with my younger cousins on snow that was already on the ground, saw dark clouds starting to build, but couldn't really see the sky to the North.

    There was a rumble of distant thunder, didn't take to much notice. The in a matter of minutes it went from bright and sunny to darker and darker. We kept on sledging and mucking about, flat calm as it had been all day. Then there was a gust of wind, couple of snow flurries went past and it just kept getting darker.

    Then there was a rumble, said to my cousin if it does that again I think we should head. Just then there was an almighty clap of thunder, echoing off the cliffs above, looked around and the sky was just evil looking. Heard this whistling noise.... and suddenly the stillness was replaced by a hellish gust of wind funnelling down this gap, that lifted my littlest cousin and his sledge clean off the ground.... his brother chased after the sledge and just as he caught it, the sky lit up and there was a deafening rumble, near pea sized hail started to belt us, and we hit briefly under the sledges!!

    We started making our way down what was only a few minutes to the house, but we were engulfed by a blizzard as if someone had just flipped a switch. Tied two sledges to a fence post and put my littlest cousin in the other and pulled him along! Got down to the house and I went back to get the other two sledges, was just unbelievable for low levels. Was blown over several times, the snow was so fine and powdery it was choking and you couldn't breath if you faced into the wind, it just took your breath away.

    By the time I staggered back down with the sledges it was less than 20mins from the first rumble of thunder we'd heard. It was now a full on white out and fumbled my way around my grandparents house, all the windows plastered with snow. There was already no way you could have gone anywhere on the road. Put the sledges in the shed, went inside (and had trouble closing the door with the wind!) and the lights were flickering. Less than 30mins after that first rumble, the power was out.

    Sitting there with an old tilly lamp for light by the open fire, the noise of the wind was just utterly unbelievable even for such an exposed place. We actually taped up some windows because we feared they would implode into the room, you could see the glass bulging with the wind! :D

    It kept raging for hours, then some time after 9pm, as suddenly as it came in, everything went silent. We could not see anything outside the whole storm, the windows were totally iced up. After a while of quietness we went out and it was perfectly still, the last of the snow clouds were clearing over the horizon and it was pretty much the most clear star filled sky I every recall seeing. The path around the back of the house that I had earlier dragged the sledges was now under 6 feet of snow!

    Looking down the road from what we could see there were clearly drifts of at least 10 feet (pretty much sea level on the West Coast!).

    Christmas Day dawned with a perfect blue sky, the powdery snow sparkling in the sun and the sea starting to freeze over in the sea lochs. Still no power and the temperature was below freezing in the bedroom, evidenced by the frozen inside of the windows and ice in the glass of water I took to bed !

    Aye people were wishing for a White Christmas, but I'm sure there were at least a few in that part of the world that haven't wished for a White Christmas since! I can vouch for the fact that digging sheep out of snow drifts is a good work out !

    With no power we lit up a BBQ with intention of spit roasting the Turkey, alas the power came back on early afternoon and the sub zero BBQ was abandoned !!

    Even on CairnGorm in a full on storm I haven't witnessed anything quite like that night. I was very lucky to have just happened to have been in the right place that Christmas Eve and I doubt any weather experience I have in the future will match it. An absolutely unbelievable event, no words can really describe how intense it was.

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    Yes, Christmas Eve 1995. Hit NW Sutherland between 3 and 4pm not long before night fall. Absolutely hammered Shetland leaving roads under 30ft drifts.

    Was up a hill only a couple of 100ft above sea level in the far North West sledging with my younger cousins on snow that was already on the ground, saw dark clouds starting to build, but couldn't really see the sky to the North.

    There was a rumble of distant thunder, didn't take to much notice. The in a matter of minutes it went from bright and sunny to darker and darker. We kept on sledging and mucking about, flat calm as it had been all day. Then there was a gust of wind, couple of snow flurries went past and it just kept getting darker.

    Then there was a rumble, said to my cousin if it does that again I think we should head. Just then there was an almighty clap of thunder, echoing off the cliffs above, looked around and the sky was just evil looking. Heard this whistling noise.... and suddenly the stillness was replaced by a hellish gust of wind funnelling down this gap, that lifted my littlest cousin and his sledge clean off the ground.... his brother chased after the sledge and just as he caught it, the sky lit up and there was a deafening rumble, near pea sized hail started to belt us, and we hit briefly under the sledges!!

    We started making our way down what was only a few minutes to the house, but we were engulfed by a blizzard as if someone had just flipped a switch. Tied two sledges to a fence post and put my littlest cousin in the other and pulled him along! Got down to the house and I went back to get the other two sledges, was just unbelievable for low levels. Was blown over several times, the snow was so fine and powdery it was choking and you couldn't breath if you faced into the wind, it just took your breath away.

    By the time I staggered back down with the sledges it was less than 20mins from the first rumble of thunder we'd heard. It was now a full on white out and fumbled my way around my grandparents house, all the windows plastered with snow. There was already no way you could have gone anywhere on the road. Put the sledges in the shed, went inside (and had trouble closing the door with the wind!) and the lights were flickering. Less than 30mins after that first rumble, the power was out.

    Sitting there with an old tilly lamp for light by the open fire, the noise of the wind was just utterly unbelievable even for such an exposed place. We actually taped up some windows because we feared they would implode into the room, you could see the glass bulging with the wind! :D

    It kept raging for hours, then some time after 9pm, as suddenly as it came in, everything went silent. We could not see anything outside the whole storm, the windows were totally iced up. After a while of quietness we went out and it was perfectly still, the last of the snow clouds were clearing over the horizon and it was pretty much the most clear star filled sky I every recall seeing. The path around the back of the house that I had earlier dragged the sledges was now under 6 feet of snow!

    Looking down the road from what we could see there were clearly drifts of at least 10 feet (pretty much sea level on the West Coast!).

    Christmas Day dawned with a perfect blue sky, the powdery snow sparkling in the sun and the sea starting to freeze over in the sea lochs. Still no power and the temperature was below freezing in the bedroom, evidenced by the frozen inside of the windows and ice in the glass of water I took to bed !

    Aye people were wishing for a White Christmas, but I'm sure there were at least a few in that part of the world that haven't wished for a White Christmas since! I can vouch for the fact that digging sheep out of snow drifts is a good work out !

    With no power we lit up a BBQ with intention of spit roasting the Turkey, alas the power came back on early afternoon and the sub zero BBQ was abandoned !!

    Even on CairnGorm in a full on storm I haven't witnessed anything quite like that night. I was very lucky to have just happened to have been in the right place that Christmas Eve and I doubt any weather experience I have in the future will match it. An absolutely unbelievable event, no words can really describe how intense it was.

    Wow that sounded pretty intense.

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    Posted
  • Location: Inbhir Nis / Inverness - 636 ft asl
  • Weather Preferences: Freezing fog, frost, snow, sunshine.
  • Location: Inbhir Nis / Inverness - 636 ft asl
    Yes, Christmas Eve 1995. Hit NW Sutherland between 3 and 4pm not long before night fall. Absolutely hammered Shetland leaving roads under 30ft drifts.

    Was up a hill only a couple of 100ft above sea level in the far North West sledging with my younger cousins on snow that was already on the ground, saw dark clouds starting to build, but couldn't really see the sky to the North.

    There was a rumble of distant thunder, didn't take to much notice. The in a matter of minutes it went from bright and sunny to darker and darker. We kept on sledging and mucking about, flat calm as it had been all day. Then there was a gust of wind, couple of snow flurries went past and it just kept getting darker.

    Then there was a rumble, said to my cousin if it does that again I think we should head. Just then there was an almighty clap of thunder, echoing off the cliffs above, looked around and the sky was just evil looking. Heard this whistling noise.... and suddenly the stillness was replaced by a hellish gust of wind funnelling down this gap, that lifted my littlest cousin and his sledge clean off the ground.... his brother chased after the sledge and just as he caught it, the sky lit up and there was a deafening rumble, near pea sized hail started to belt us, and we hit briefly under the sledges!!

    We started making our way down what was only a few minutes to the house, but we were engulfed by a blizzard as if someone had just flipped a switch. Tied two sledges to a fence post and put my littlest cousin in the other and pulled him along! Got down to the house and I went back to get the other two sledges, was just unbelievable for low levels. Was blown over several times, the snow was so fine and powdery it was choking and you couldn't breath if you faced into the wind, it just took your breath away.

    By the time I staggered back down with the sledges it was less than 20mins from the first rumble of thunder we'd heard. It was now a full on white out and fumbled my way around my grandparents house, all the windows plastered with snow. There was already no way you could have gone anywhere on the road. Put the sledges in the shed, went inside (and had trouble closing the door with the wind!) and the lights were flickering. Less than 30mins after that first rumble, the power was out.

    Sitting there with an old tilly lamp for light by the open fire, the noise of the wind was just utterly unbelievable even for such an exposed place. We actually taped up some windows because we feared they would implode into the room, you could see the glass bulging with the wind! :D

    It kept raging for hours, then some time after 9pm, as suddenly as it came in, everything went silent. We could not see anything outside the whole storm, the windows were totally iced up. After a while of quietness we went out and it was perfectly still, the last of the snow clouds were clearing over the horizon and it was pretty much the most clear star filled sky I every recall seeing. The path around the back of the house that I had earlier dragged the sledges was now under 6 feet of snow!

    Looking down the road from what we could see there were clearly drifts of at least 10 feet (pretty much sea level on the West Coast!).

    Christmas Day dawned with a perfect blue sky, the powdery snow sparkling in the sun and the sea starting to freeze over in the sea lochs. Still no power and the temperature was below freezing in the bedroom, evidenced by the frozen inside of the windows and ice in the glass of water I took to bed !

    Aye people were wishing for a White Christmas, but I'm sure there were at least a few in that part of the world that haven't wished for a White Christmas since! I can vouch for the fact that digging sheep out of snow drifts is a good work out !

    With no power we lit up a BBQ with intention of spit roasting the Turkey, alas the power came back on early afternoon and the sub zero BBQ was abandoned !!

    Even on CairnGorm in a full on storm I haven't witnessed anything quite like that night. I was very lucky to have just happened to have been in the right place that Christmas Eve and I doubt any weather experience I have in the future will match it. An absolutely unbelievable event, no words can really describe how intense it was.

    Yeh my mum always says: 'when you were five, Robbie, and it was Christmas, there was a big blizzard. It was the first proper snow you had ever seen, and you wanted to go and see what it was like". I was totally oblivious to this event, I just thought it was so cool that it was properly snowing. Maybe where my love for snow came from? haha, but apparently this is the biggest snow event my mum and dad can remember up here, expect from in the 80s when there was a massive powercut due to power-cables collapsing under the weight of the snow.

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    Posted
  • Location: Liphook
  • Location: Liphook

    NL-In answer to your question that looks like a pretty classic polar low to me, fax charts showed a 982mbs low in the same place and it has a classic look IMO, one of the better examples I've seen that one, clear eye like feature as well with that one.

    The Dec 1995 system was a polar low, probably looking at constant heavy snow showers, probably would get some very high snowfall rates from one of those systems though it depends on how powerful the low gets.

    the Jan 28th 2004 was a cold front, granted it was a very powerful cold front.

    the ironic thing about polar lows is that they have a slight warm core, which is why it develops convection and also organises in a similar way to the other warm core systems...hurricanes...I'd love to look up exactly what forcing process causes weak systems to gain a slight warm core and beocme a strong low pressure system!

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    Posted
  • Location: South Shields Tyne & Wear half mile from the coast.
  • Location: South Shields Tyne & Wear half mile from the coast.

    Cheers Kold, i thought it was but didnt want to look a complete 'dumb knutz', yeah the forcing

    for this is an intriguing question this may help.

    http://www.zamg.ac.at/docu/Manual/SatManu/...s/PL/backgr.htm

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    Posted
  • Location: South Shields Tyne & Wear half mile from the coast.
  • Location: South Shields Tyne & Wear half mile from the coast.

    I'm not sure on that Rain, but i think it was a tropical airmass bumping into Polar air which caused that but i could be wrong.

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    Posted
  • Location: Western Isles
  • Location: Western Isles
    Yes, Christmas Eve 1995. Hit NW Sutherland between 3 and 4pm not long before night fall. Absolutely hammered Shetland leaving roads under 30ft drifts.

    Was up a hill only a couple of 100ft above sea level in the far North West sledging with my younger cousins on snow that was already on the ground, saw dark clouds starting to build, but couldn't really see the sky to the North.

    :doh:

    cool, sounds very extreme and a great read!

    Very interesting Skifreak :D Here is the chart of that night...

    thanks for posting them mate

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    Posted
  • Location: City of Gales, New Zealand, 150m ASL
  • Location: City of Gales, New Zealand, 150m ASL
    the ironic thing about polar lows is that they have a slight warm core,

    So we would see anticyclonic behaviour at higher levels above a polar low?

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    Posted
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
    So we would see anticyclonic behaviour at higher levels above a polar low?

    nope

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    Posted
  • Location: City of Gales, New Zealand, 150m ASL
  • Location: City of Gales, New Zealand, 150m ASL
    nope

    But isn't that what's supposed to happen above a warm cored cyclone?

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    • 1 month later...
    Posted
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet
    The ironic thing about polar lows is that they have a slight warm core, which is why it develops convection and also organises in a similar way to the other warm core systems...hurricanes...I'd love to look up exactly what forcing process causes weak systems to gain a slight warm core and beocme a strong low pressure system!

    Kold, i was under the impression that Polar Lows had symetrical cold cores, and that the anticyclonic nature was at the surface (with upper air of -15C or below, a surface high will always form)??

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    Posted
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks

    maybe you should read this sb, its in our Guides section and gives various links for additional reading.

    http://www.netweather.tv/forum/index.php?showtopic=21629

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