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The remarkable snowfalls of late April 1908: 100 years on


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Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam

    Late April 1908 was exceptionally wintry when slow moving low pressures and Arctic air combined to produce huge snowfalls in many parts of the south. The period 23rd-26th April produced snowfalls that would have been notable even in January. Norfolk and Suffolk: 30cm of lying snow on the 23rd; Epsom racecourse: 15cm on the 24th; Southampton 35cm on the 25th and Oxford 40cm on the 26th.

    The 24th of April was exceptionally cold with a CET mean of just 0.5, one of the coldest CET days ever recorded for April.

    23rd-25th April CET: 1.6

    April 1908 CET: 6.0

    -12.8C was recorded at Garforth (West Yorkshire) and at Perth on the 24th

    -12.2C was recorded at Corstorphine(Edinburgh) on the 25th.

    The last two days of April 1908 were considerably milder and this brought a rapid thaw to the lying snow causing serious flooding through the meltwater.

    Some photos

    http://www.hertfordshire-genealogy.co.uk/i...ickens-snow.jpg

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/wiltshire/content/ima...908_399x245.jpg

    http://www.levengolfingsociety.co.uk/images/LGS%20OLD.jpg

    Over the next couple of days, Times articles on the huge snowfalls.

    From the 24th of April 1908 edition

    April1908a.jpg

    April1908b.jpg

    April1908c.jpg

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    Posted
  • Location: Windermere 120m asl
  • Location: Windermere 120m asl

    Yes the 1908 late april snowfall was perhaps the most notable snow event of the last century. The next most notable probably that of late 1981. Any chance of putting up any reports from the 1981 event. I'm sure many members will remember that event, incidentally I was only coming up to 3 years old at the time so have no recollection.

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    Posted
  • Location: Putney, SW London. A miserable 14m asl....but nevertheless the lucky recipient of c 20cm of snow in 12 hours 1-2 Feb 2009!
  • Location: Putney, SW London. A miserable 14m asl....but nevertheless the lucky recipient of c 20cm of snow in 12 hours 1-2 Feb 2009!
    Yes the 1908 late april snowfall was perhaps the most notable snow event of the last century. The next most notable probably that of late 1981.

    The 1908 one was certainly exceptional on several counts, but I think it's highly debatable whether the Dec 81 fall constitutes the second most notable snow event of the 20th Century.

    To name but a few: the enormous falls of March 1916 in Northern England, especially up on the Pennines.....the Southern England Boxing Day blizzard of 1927 - 20 ft drifts on Salisbury Plain, and 15 ft even in the Surrey Hills.....the huge and widespread accumulations of Feb/March 1947 & Jan/Feb 1963, especially on the moors of Devon & Somerset....the March '79 blizzards of NE England......or the February 1978 blizzard in SW England - 20-30 ft drifts & some of the smaller combes (valleys) quite literally filled with snow, with patches surviving till May. It is said that four and half million sheep died in the snows of '47.

    Edited by osmposm
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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts
  • Weather Preferences: Rain/snow, fog, gales and cold in every season
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts
    The 1908 one was certainly exceptional on several counts, but I think it's highly debatable whether the Dec 81 fall constitutes the second most notable snow event of the 20th Century.

    To name but a few: the enormous falls of March 1916 in Northern England, especially up on the Pennines.....the Southern England Boxing Day blizzard of 1927 - 20 ft drifts on Salisbury Plain, and 15 ft even in the Surrey Hills.....the huge and widespread accumulations of Feb/March 1947 & Jan/Feb 1963, especially on the moors of Devon & Somerset....the March '79 blizzards of NE England......or the February 1978 blizzard in SW England - 20-30 ft drifts & some of the smaller combes (valleys) quite literally filled with snow, with patches surviving till May. It is said that four and half million sheep died in the snows of '47.

    I think you've got the wrong end of the proverbial stick here, Os', the references were relating to April snowfalls only.

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    Posted
  • Location: Putney, SW London. A miserable 14m asl....but nevertheless the lucky recipient of c 20cm of snow in 12 hours 1-2 Feb 2009!
  • Location: Putney, SW London. A miserable 14m asl....but nevertheless the lucky recipient of c 20cm of snow in 12 hours 1-2 Feb 2009!

    Um....yes :D:D . I was confused by the bare phrases "most notable snow event" and "late 1981"....and it was late....and I can be remarkably stupid sometimes. Apologies, Damian.

    If a mod fancies deleting my idiotic post to save my blushes, I would be very happy. Ossie.

    Edited by osmposm
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    • 11 months later...
    Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam

    Here are some reports of snow depths and other info on the remarkable heavy snowfalls that occurred during late April 1908.

    Knotty Ash: 6 inches (24th-26th)

    Milton Bryant: Snow fell from 1.30 to 6pm on 23rd. 8 inches

    Newmarket: So severe was the snowstorm that racing stopped at 3.30pm on the 23rd

    Hethersett: Heavy fall of snow, depth by morning of 24th was 9 inches.

    Liskeard: 5 inches of snow on 23rd

    Drunmore: 9 inches of snow on 23rd

    24th April

    Epsom: 6 inches melted by noon

    Detling: 5 inches

    Christchurch: 14 inches

    Great Barford: 8 inches

    Camden Square: 3.5 inches

    Ticehurst: 2 inches

    Broham: 12 inches

    Dovercroft: 1.5 inches

    Haslingden: 3 inches

    Lampeter: 6 inches

    Criccieth: 2 inches

    Lurgan: 7 inches by noon

    25th April

    Headley House: 15 inches

    West dean: 18 inches

    Shrewton: 14 inches

    Haslemere: 12 inches, 3ft drifts

    Epsom: 5 inches

    Freshwater: 14 inches

    East Cowes: 10 inches

    Bournemouth: 12 inches

    Milford-on-Sea: 15 inches

    Fordingbridge: 9 inches

    Broughton: 18 inches

    Alton: 15 inches

    Barton Stacey: 24 inches

    Newbury: 18 inches

    Yattendon Court: 20 inches

    Farnborough: 20 inches

    Abingdon: 27 inches

    Caversham: 16 inches

    Bicester: 16 inches

    Steeple Aston: 16 inches. 6ft drifts

    Downton: 15 inches

    Stratford-sub-Castle: 15 inches

    Wilcot: 11.5 inches

    Poole: 9 inches

    Long Compton: 13 inches

    Honington: 11 inches

    Leamington: 8 inches

    Coventry: 9 inches

    Alderney: 13 inches

    Some other reports

    Meltham

    Maxima was below 39.0F from 23rd to 25th

    Snow fell on 4 consecutive days

    9 inches

    Max temp on 24th was 34.5F and noon temp was 25.6F

    Northwood, Middlesex

    19th April: NNW wind, frequent heavy snow showers

    20th April: Sleet/snow squalls

    21st April: Milder

    22nd April: Rain towards evening

    23rd: Rain turning to snow

    24th: 3 inches of snow

    25th: Heavy snow early morning. Further snow 10am-12pm, 4 inches

    Oxford

    23rd April: Rain turning to sleet, snowing heavily by 4pm.

    24th April: 4 inches of snow on ground, afternoon snow showers.

    25th April: 13 inches of snow by 4pm

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    • 13 years later...

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