Jump to content
Thunder?
Local
Radar
Pollen
IGNORED

Plant Identification


Recommended Posts

Posted
  • Location: Bristol, England
  • Location: Bristol, England

    I am trying to identify weeds or plants that have grown all over my veg plot in courtyard.

    Basically, it is the same species and all weeds/plants are currently about 2.5 foot tall

    and all plants/weeds terminate with a large ball-shaped bud on a stalk

    (about an inch or more in diameter) that opens up to reveal a large flower-head

    with large pink petals (which rather resemble rose flowers).

    Firstly, I was wondering if they could be a poisonous weed or plant that must be

    removed with great care?

    Just wondered if anyone could possibly identify what I'm talking about with the information

    I have provided here.

    Many thanks.

    TS.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    • Replies 17
    • Created
    • Last Reply
    Posted
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and lots of it or warm and sunny, no mediocre dross
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl

    Doesn't sound like any weed I can think of, without a piccie it's a little tricky to be sure but it sounds like an Opium Poppy. They'll spring up from nowhere in large numbers; they pull out really easily and won't come back if you leave some root behind (annuals, flowering once only).

    This it? http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=h...ficial%26sa%3DG

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Posted
  • Location: Bristol, England
  • Location: Bristol, England
    Doesn't sound like any weed I can think of, without a piccie it's a little tricky to be sure but it sounds like an Opium Poppy. They'll spring up from nowhere in large numbers; they pull out really easily and won't come back if you leave some root behind (annuals, flowering once only).

    This it? http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=h...ficial%26sa%3DG

    Jethro, many thanks for your advice.

    If they are an Opium Poppies (and looking at Google Images it may well be) I assume I will have to get rid of them

    quickly as it's surely illegal to have them growing in the veg plot!

    Or is it illegal only if the seeds are collected?

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I am trying to identify weeds or plants that have grown all over my veg plot in courtyard.

    Basically, it is the same species and all weeds/plants are currently about 2.5 foot tall

    and all plants/weeds terminate with a large ball-shaped bud on a stalk

    (about an inch or more in diameter) that opens up to reveal a large flower-head

    with large pink petals (which rather resemble rose flowers).

    Firstly, I was wondering if they could be a poisonous weed or plant that must be

    removed with great care?

    Just wondered if anyone could possibly identify what I'm talking about with the information

    I have provided here.

    Many thanks.

    TS.

    Does the plant develop seed heads that explode upon touch?If so i believe it's a Himalayan summit but they are becoming a nuisance in Durham.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Posted
  • Location: New Zealand
  • Location: New Zealand

    That would be himalayan balsam :) ... the description doesn't sound like that...

    ... trick with himilayan balsam also is to pull it out of the ground before seeding time, but also, not to leave the plant (or part of it) on the ground, as it can grow by feeding on its own carcass.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Posted
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and lots of it or warm and sunny, no mediocre dross
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl
    Jethro, many thanks for your advice.

    If they are an Opium Poppies (and looking at Google Images it may well be) I assume I will have to get rid of them

    quickly as it's surely illegal to have them growing in the veg plot!

    Or is it illegal only if the seeds are collected?

    Not illegal to grow nor illegal to keep seeds, indeed many nurseries breed and sell them in various colours. It's only illegal to process them for opiate consumption, yes I do know how to and no, I'm not telling. I think they're beautiful, also the seed heads can be dried and used as decoration.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    That would be himalayan balsam ;) ... the description doesn't sound like that...

    ... trick with himilayan balsam also is to pull it out of the ground before seeding time, but also, not to leave the plant (or part of it) on the ground, as it can grow by feeding on its own carcass.

    Thanks for that crimsone.I will pass that info on to the works groundsmen as they tried strimming it but as you stated it comes back.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Posted
  • Location: New Zealand
  • Location: New Zealand

    lol... if they're anything like council workers, they're idiots... but it's not their fault if they haven't been trained...

    If it's got those explosive almost mishapen rugby ball shaped seed pods, small light coloured flowers and watery/waxy almost translucent stems that get reddish around the roots, it's most probably himilayan balsam... pull it out by the root before it seeds, and make sure not to leave it on the ground (and be aware, you might not think much of a patch of soil and think "it can't grow there", but this stuff's a survivor - it comes, after all, from the Himilayas! It could almost grow in a bucket of sand if it was wet enough and the water not static (it LOVES streams and rivers, with the added effect of it being spread downstream... it's why you often see it on the sides of roads too)

    Essentially, once it's out of the ground, either leave it on concrete to dry in the sun, burn it as best you can, or if there's not so much of it, you can even fold it up and rest it in the branch of a tree to die - just don't leave it or it's small root system (it doesn't have muchh root - it's a plant for shallow earth) in or on the ground. Strimming it is the absolute worst thing to do to it.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    lol... if they're anything like council workers, they're idiots... but it's not their fault if they haven't been trained...

    If it's got those explosive almost mishapen rugby ball shaped seed pods, small light coloured flowers and watery/waxy almost translucent stems that get reddish around the roots, it's most probably himilayan balsam... pull it out by the root before it seeds, and make sure not to leave it on the ground (and be aware, you might not think much of a patch of soil and think "it can't grow there", but this stuff's a survivor - it comes, after all, from the Himilayas! It could almost grow in a bucket of sand if it was wet enough and the water not static (it LOVES streams and rivers, with the added effect of it being spread downstream... it's why you often see it on the sides of roads too)

    Essentially, once it's out of the ground, either leave it on concrete to dry in the sun, burn it as best you can, or if there's not so much of it, you can even fold it up and rest it in the branch of a tree to die - just don't leave it or it's small root system (it doesn't have muchh root - it's a plant for shallow earth) in or on the ground. Strimming it is the absolute worst thing to do to it.

    I'll print this off if you don't mind Crimsome, and thank you. ;)

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Posted
  • Location: New Zealand
  • Location: New Zealand

    lol lol lol... well... I hope it helps, but if they turn around and say it's actually Japanese Knotweed (argh! lol... two very different plants in all, but it's equally prolific) then there's no easy answer... The best way to get rid of japanese knotweed is to dig deep, get it out (runners included), and to scorch the earth. It's a nightmare... and even then it could well just find it's way to popping up somewhere else.

    There are two theories about how Japanese Knotweed ended up in the UK... one is the victorian fad for oriental gardens, and the other is that somebody thought it would be a bright idea to use it to stabilise railway embankments (which really tells you everything you could ever need to know about it! lol)... or perhaps a combination of both.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    lol lol lol... well... I hope it helps, but if they turn around and say it's actually Japanese Knotweed (argh! lol... two very different plants at all, but it's equally prolific) then there's no easy answer... The best way to get rid of japanese knotweed is to dig deep, get it out (runners included), and to scorch the earth. It's a nightmare... and even then it could well just find it's way to popping up somewhere else.

    No it was definately Himalayan balsam pet. ;)

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Posted
  • Location: Worthing West Sussex
  • Location: Worthing West Sussex
    Not illegal to grow nor illegal to keep seeds, indeed many nurseries breed and sell them in various colours. It's only illegal to process them for opiate consumption, yes I do know how to and no, I'm not telling. I think they're beautiful, also the seed heads can be dried and used as decoration.

    The seeds contain little or no opiate, you will find the [opium poppy] seeds on baguettes in your local superstore bakery! They impart a nutty flavour and aroma if lightly toasted or fried. Another annual self-seeder is the blue-flowered, feathery leaved, 'love-in-a-mist', Nigella, the black seeds of which are used as a spice in Indian recipes [kalonji], notably to flavour naan bread.

    Japanese knotweed in the UK is apparently a clone, all female, and genetically identical! Possibly the most massive female in the world(after my ex-mother-in-law :rolleyes: )!

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Posted
  • Location: Worthing West Sussex
  • Location: Worthing West Sussex
    Hope she doesn't read this for your sake Chris :doh:

    Dunno, she probably bounced off this mortal coil years ago. :(

    She was so fat, her arms were too short for her laptop, and she needed special distance glasses to see the screen.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    • 3 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Putney, SW London. A miserable 14m asl....but nevertheless the lucky recipient of c 20cm of snow in 12 hours 1-2 Feb 2009!
  • Location: Putney, SW London. A miserable 14m asl....but nevertheless the lucky recipient of c 20cm of snow in 12 hours 1-2 Feb 2009!
    ......It's only illegal to process them for opiate consumption, yes I do know how to and no, I'm not telling. I think they're beautiful.......

    I have a very double dusky pink variety that is perhaps more likely to be Thundersquall's one (though I prefer the single mauve). It surprisingly comes true from seed. This seems to be it: http://www.dkimages.com/discover/DKIMAGES/...um-Paeon-1.html

    Some years ago....purely in a spirit of scientific enquiry, you understand...I, um, did the thing to the seed head that you see them doing in films about opium production, and.....absolutely nothing came out. I suspect that in England they don't get enough heat. Or maybe the double variety doesn't produce. Probably a good thing, too.

    Ossie

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Posted
  • Location: Cambridgeshire Fens. 3m ASL
  • Location: Cambridgeshire Fens. 3m ASL

    If you want a good book to identify wild flowers, The wild flower key by Francis Rose is excellent once you get the hang of the layout. ISBN# 0 7232 2419 6

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Archived

    This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

    ×
    ×
    • Create New...