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Another early leaf fall?


SP1986

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Posted
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral
  • Weather Preferences: Summer: warm, humid, thundery. Winter: mild, stormy, some snow.
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral

    I don't think its directly to do with temperatures, but Ive noticed alot of berries forming a lot lot earlier than they should do, this may lead to another early leaf fall, has anyone else seen any early berries?

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    Posted
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield
  • Weather Preferences: Any Extreme
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield
    I don't think its directly to do with temperatures, but Ive noticed alot of berries forming a lot lot earlier than they should do, this may lead to another early leaf fall, has anyone else seen any early berries?

    Nope but then not really looked and until today I haven't been able to go out in the last two weeks.

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    Posted
  • Location: Atherstone on Stour: 160ft asl
  • Location: Atherstone on Stour: 160ft asl
    I don't think its directly to do with temperatures, but Ive noticed alot of berries forming a lot lot earlier than they should do, this may lead to another early leaf fall, has anyone else seen any early berries?

    Elderberries are just starting to form, but I wouldn't say they were any earlier. Hazelnuts are definitely earlier though.

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    Posted
  • Location: Hampshire Snow Hoper
  • Location: Hampshire Snow Hoper
    Elderberries are just starting to form, but I wouldn't say they were any earlier. Hazelnuts are definitely earlier though.

    here in hampshire its business as usual lots of dead leaves on ground but thats because we have had most unusual amount of very strong winds that in turn brings down the leaves and in these very dry conditions the leaves die and go brown horse chestnut has suffered especially.some areas that i work as a gardener it looks quite autumnal but falsely so for the above reason.

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    Posted
  • Location: Taunton, Somerset
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, thunder, strong winds. HATE:stagnant weather patterns
  • Location: Taunton, Somerset
    here in hampshire its business as usual lots of dead leaves on ground but thats because we have had most unusual amount of very strong winds that in turn brings down the leaves and in these very dry conditions the leaves die and go brown horse chestnut has suffered especially.some areas that i work as a gardener it looks quite autumnal but falsely so for the above reason.

    Similar conditions here, mostly due to the strong winds as you say.

    One thing I have noticed for this year is Dutch Elm disease seems to be a lot worse than previous years. There is a 20ft elm opposite my driveway that appeared to be resisting the disease as other elms showed signs of the disease around it (but even these came back with weakened leaves this year, since to have totally died), but in the last week the disease has spread incredibly quickly and has killed the entire tree in one foul swoop. The dieback literally moved significantly day by day from the crown to the trunk, and it took about a week. Such a shame, what a horrible disease. I have noticed most years that the disease takes a few years to entirely kill the elm, and a few shows signs of the disease or die per year in the group in the fields opposite my house. This year however, 9 of the trees are currently showing rapid dieback and only an equal number (mostly new saplings) currently remain untouched by the disease.

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    Posted
  • Location: Ashbourne,County Meath,about 6 miles northwest of dublin airport. 74m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Cold weather - frost or snow
  • Location: Ashbourne,County Meath,about 6 miles northwest of dublin airport. 74m ASL

    I have a blackberry bush in my back garden,the berries are coming out now,not black yet of course just green/red in colour,but i still think its a bit early

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    Posted
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral
  • Weather Preferences: Summer: warm, humid, thundery. Winter: mild, stormy, some snow.
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral

    I'm sure biologically if there is an earlier (than normal) berry growth that will almost certainly signal an early leaf drop, due to the biological factors involved. Afterall leaves are there to pick nutrients up to aid the development of fruit, so once the fruit has dropped, the leaves fall off as they have no more use in the deciduous world, the funny thing is that even though there are patterns between light levels and natural deciduous vegetation, it doesn't appear to be linked with how warm a climate is, for example the island of Crete is probably the warmest year round climate in Europe, however it still has deciduous vegetation. It may be that there was an earlier flowering year which may cause the berries to come on early, in that case the suggests fruiting periods go by a strict timing in deciduous forests.

    I can tell you that Ash berries are certainly early by a few weeks despite the Ash coming into leaf quite late.

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    Posted
  • Location: Atherstone on Stour: 160ft asl
  • Location: Atherstone on Stour: 160ft asl
    I have a blackberry bush in my back garden,the berries are coming out now,not black yet of course just green/red in colour,but i still think its a bit early

    :lol: :o

    Mine are not even in flower yet !!

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    Posted
  • Location: Bedworth, North Warwickshire 404ft above sea level
  • Location: Bedworth, North Warwickshire 404ft above sea level
    :o :)

    Mine are not even in flower yet !!

    I have noticed the acers (pot grown yes, and pot grown plants always seem to colour up early), are already starting to colour up and the growth has slowed down to almost stop. From past experience I know this does not indicate a future weather pattern, but it does seen to be symptomatic of a deffinate change in the weather over the past 3 years?

    Oh, I forgot to say I work on a plant nursery :lol:

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    Posted
  • Location: Putney, SW London. A miserable 14m asl....but nevertheless the lucky recipient of c 20cm of snow in 12 hours 1-2 Feb 2009!
  • Location: Putney, SW London. A miserable 14m asl....but nevertheless the lucky recipient of c 20cm of snow in 12 hours 1-2 Feb 2009!
    I have a blackberry bush in my back garden,the berries are coming out now,not black yet of course just green/red in colour,but i still think its a bit early

    Wild brambles/blackberries have, in my experience, been getting progressively earlier like many things. I believe, as Stephen suggests or implies, that this is because with milder winters and earlier springs, the growth/flowering cycle begins that much earlier and so comes - quite literally - to fruition that much earlier, too. Having said that, many commercial varieties are stated to fruit in early/mid-July.

    Have a look here: http://www.naturescalendar.org.uk/map/curr...y=2008&rs=A

    You will see there that even ripe bramble fruit are now common in the south well before mid-July - though as brambles carry on flowering and fruiting thereafter, you also get the fruit when you'd expect it in August/September - much later if it's mild.

    Ossie

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    Posted
  • Location: Putney, SW London. A miserable 14m asl....but nevertheless the lucky recipient of c 20cm of snow in 12 hours 1-2 Feb 2009!
  • Location: Putney, SW London. A miserable 14m asl....but nevertheless the lucky recipient of c 20cm of snow in 12 hours 1-2 Feb 2009!

    ....and in the last couple of days the first fruit have now ripened on the wild brambles currently flourishing in what was once my garden.

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    • 2 months later...
    Posted
  • Location: Atherstone on Stour: 160ft asl
  • Location: Atherstone on Stour: 160ft asl
    I don't think its directly to do with temperatures, but Ive noticed alot of berries forming a lot lot earlier than they should do, this may lead to another early leaf fall, has anyone else seen any early berries?

    Not for me, I'd say things are on course and normal here. A couple of cooler nights followed by a brisk wind & I'll be up to waist in Lime, Walnut & Beech leaves.

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    Posted
  • Location: SE London
  • Location: SE London
    I don't think its directly to do with temperatures, but Ive noticed alot of berries forming a lot lot earlier than they should do, this may lead to another early leaf fall, has anyone else seen any early berries?
    i walk the dog around an area that is full of blackberry bushes. i have, for the first time in ages, noticed 2 crops of berries this year. one in July and another batch just about ripe this last week. not sure if i have just not taken notice before, or if it is a usual thing to have two lots in a year.
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    Posted
  • Location: Atherstone on Stour: 160ft asl
  • Location: Atherstone on Stour: 160ft asl
    i walk the dog around an area that is full of blackberry bushes. i have, for the first time in ages, noticed 2 crops of berries this year. one in July and another batch just about ripe this last week. not sure if i have just not taken notice before, or if it is a usual thing to have two lots in a year.

    Hi Mick, I've got a few bushes dotted around the garden. One lot were edible in the 1st week of August, another bush about 10ft away are just coming out now !!

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    • 3 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral
  • Weather Preferences: Summer: warm, humid, thundery. Winter: mild, stormy, some snow.
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral

    Leaf fall may well be back to November periods this year. Currently leaf yellowing is 80% green, and 20% yellow, so mostly green, I think another late drop here instead of the early drop I have questioned in June.

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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts
  • Weather Preferences: Rain/snow, fog, gales and cold in every season
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts

    Leaf fall seems to be about average in this part of the world. The Sycamores and Thorns in the fields behind my house have already lost 50% of their leaves but there's nothing unusual in that as, standing at almost 350m a.s.l, they are in a very exposed area.

    In more sheltered areas on lower ground the usual suspects are dropping their leaves at a steady rate, Balsam Poplars in particular and Horse Chestnut to a lesser extent. Looking across at the local woods I would say 70% green or greenish and 30% autumn colour.

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    Posted
  • Location: Taunton, Somerset
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, thunder, strong winds. HATE:stagnant weather patterns
  • Location: Taunton, Somerset

    Mostly still green here despite the cold nights of late. Young ashes are very colourful and the sycamore has lost a lot of it's leaves but other than that just a small drop of leaves and some slight colouring in most trees.

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    Posted
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral
  • Weather Preferences: Summer: warm, humid, thundery. Winter: mild, stormy, some snow.
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral

    Colouring is always first on the silver Birch, but this year, the Sycamores have got the most colour in them. Oak refuses to turn yellow, as does Ash. So the only two real trees showing any signs of change are Birch and Sycamore. I imagine it will really accelerate soon though, I would except the Sycamore to have lost their leaves full before November, and the same with Birch, and although the other trees are a little late compared to old averages, it's more inline with what we have seen the last few years.

    Having said that, the trees that are turning are the most colourful I have ever seen, some wonderful exotic orange-red shades in there!

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    Posted
  • Location: Mytholmroyd, West Yorks.......
  • Weather Preferences: Hot & Sunny, Cold & Snowy
  • Location: Mytholmroyd, West Yorks.......

    I'd argee with the 'colourful' display we are being treated too.

    I suppose the leaves were to stongly attached the last 'blow' we had through here so they are having time on the bough to 'colour up'.

    I am, however, being treated to a second flush of Raspberries which has not occured here in my time.......somehow even sweeter after you palette has gotten used to the blackberries!

    If fruiting becomes ever earlier then this 'second flush' may become an unlooked for bonus of AGW......I'm sure the mice,voles shrews and wild birds would vote for it!!!

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    Posted
  • Location: Norton, Stockton-on-Tees
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and cold in winter, warm and sunny in summer
  • Location: Norton, Stockton-on-Tees

    There's an avenue of lime trees along from my house and in past autumns they turn paler and paler until they are a yellowy-greeny colour. This year there is most definitely an orange tinge to the leaves - very nice! If I remember (and if it's not raining) I'll take a photo tomorrow and upload it.

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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts
  • Weather Preferences: Rain/snow, fog, gales and cold in every season
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts

    A rapid loss of leaves here in the past week, many trees above 300m are now almost, or completely, leafless.

    The Ash seem to be losing their leaves earlier than in recent years for some reason, although there's always an exception; one standing among a group of Sycamore at 350m, fully exposed to the wind in all directions, is still in full leaf yet all the trees around it are bare.

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    • 2 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts
  • Weather Preferences: Rain/snow, fog, gales and cold in every season
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts

    Barely a leaf left on any tree in this immediate area although plenty left on Beech, Birch and Oak at lower levels.

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    Posted
  • Location: Powys Mid Wales borders.
  • Location: Powys Mid Wales borders.
    A rapid loss of leaves here in the past week, many trees above 300m are now almost, or completely, leafless.

    The Ash seem to be losing their leaves earlier than in recent years for some reason, although there's always an exception;

    The ash are the earliest I`ve seen them lose there leaves for a good many years,it`s because in spring they are always the last to come out well here oak before ash a splash can`t go by that saying oak the same time as the ash yes, hardly never ash before oak as I`ve seen.

    Anyway May was such a warm month after March/april being colder this year other trees which normaly come out earlier were all delayed until late april and also very little grass, thats why the sycamore are later losing there leaves this time as they are around the 1st to come out.

    So may was hot and the ash came out much earlier to normal besides one very late in late june/july for some reason then the leaves have just come off them earlier as for that late one that too is bare as one just here is still partly covered summer didn`t help much either.

    Beech are earlier aswell don`t know why that is.

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