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Jane Louise

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  • Location: Cheltenham,Glos
  • Weather Preferences: Thunderstorms :D
  • Location: Cheltenham,Glos

    Brontophobia:

    An abnormal and persistent fear of thunder that causes undue anxiety even though sufferers realize that thunder itself poses no threat to them. When outdoors during a thunderstorm, they may suffer excessive anxiety. When indoors, they may hide under beds or desks, behind sofas, or in closets.

    A thunder storm is most often a mild event. Even in the loudest of conditions, the thunder storm is nothing that can cause physical harm to a person. But in the case of Brontophobia, the person feels as though they are in some sort of danger when they hear the thunder storm clapping or when a thunder storm is going to occur. The person with the fear of a thunder storm will react differently to the thunder storm based upon where they are, physically, when the thunder storm is taking place.Thunder storm phobia

    When out of doors, the person with the fear of the thunder storm may find themselves dealing with very high levels of anxiety. These feelings of anxiety related to the thunder storm can cause physical effects on the body. During times of immense anxiety, the fight or flight response will be initiated. This response is a natural response to a situation that threatens harm on the person fearing the thunder storm. The pupils will dilate in order for vision to be improved. The lungs will open up and the heart rate will increase in order to prepare the body to run. The blood pressure will raise in order to adapt to the running that is about to occur and the blood from the extremities will drain in order to reduce bleeding during the fight.When inside during the thunder storm, the reactions of the body will be the same, but the thunder storm sounds will cause the person to physically hide as if they are in danger. They may climb under a table, hide under a blanket or run into a closet in order to escape the impending sense of doom associated with the fear of the thunder storm.

    While many believe the fear of a thunder storm is left for the youngest of children, adults are the most common sufferers of this very real social anxiety based condition. The Brontophobia will often be observed avoiding all activities out of doors when the chance of a thunder storm is on the horizon. Medical attention can help the Brontophobic sufferer to regain the control that the fear of a thunder storm takes away.

    "Brontophobia" is derived from the Greek "bronte" (thunder) and "phobos" (fear). This same Greek word has given us the English word "brontometer," an instrument for recording the activity of thunderstorms.

    The Common Symptoms Of Brontophobia

    Some of the common symptoms of Brontophobia incorporate panic attack, rapid heart beat, sweaty palms, nausea and much more.

    What is more, the phobia is debilitating and so you may get very weak and find it hard to concentrate on the work that you do.

    The treatments for this kind of phobia include traditional cognitive behavioral therapy like counter-conditioning, flooding, gradual exposure therapy and much more.

    While this method claims success, it involves a great deal of mental pain. It also requires frequent therapy sessions over several weeks.

    Traditional therapy, in which you sit or lie down and tell your problems to a therapist, takes months or years to bring relief, and the results are quite unpredictable.

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    Posted
  • Location: 14m als, Clacton-on Sea,NE Essex
  • Location: 14m als, Clacton-on Sea,NE Essex

    hi,,, you've just described me above, :angry: though my doctor called it astraphobia,and how do i cope???

    I'm forever watching forecasts, netweather radar as i 'm better if i'm warned than if a storm suprises me. in a storm itself everything i have ever learnt about storms goes out the window and i'm determined lightning gonna get me, i have all lights on,curtains shut and when i can't cope anymore i bring the kids downstairs-no matter what hour- which i hate doing ,but have too

    I've always had this phobia and it often spoils summer events as if there may be a chance of storm we won't go.

    Luckily my children ,thanks to my husband love storms and laugh at their silly mum !!

    i've tried everything to cure myself ,learning etc,forcing to look out the window,, but nothing works as all rational thoughts go out window when in storm :whistling:

    any one got any suggestions?????

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheltenham,Glos
  • Weather Preferences: Thunderstorms :D
  • Location: Cheltenham,Glos
    hi,,, you've just described me above, :lol: though my doctor called it astraphobia,and how do i cope???

    I'm forever watching forecasts, netweather radar as i 'm better if i'm warned than if a storm suprises me. in a storm itself everything i have ever learnt about storms goes out the window and i'm determined lightning gonna get me, i have all lights on,curtains shut and when i can't cope anymore i bring the kids downstairs-no matter what hour- which i hate doing ,but have too

    I've always had this phobia and it often spoils summer events as if there may be a chance of storm we won't go.

    Luckily my children ,thanks to my husband love storms and laugh at their silly mum !!

    i've tried everything to cure myself ,learning etc,forcing to look out the window,, but nothing works as all rational thoughts go out window when in storm :lol:

    any one got any suggestions?????

    Hi donna, :)

    As an anxiety sufferer myself for the past 20 years (not with thunderstorms though) I am presently on an anxiety course which is teaching me to change my thoughts.

    Here are a few tips that I have learnt which you could apply to your thunderstorm fear espicially when a thunderstorm arrives :)

    1. Challenge your thoughts. i.e

    Ask yourself how likely am I to be struck by lightning?

    Answer: Odds of being struck by lightning in a given year (estimated total deaths + injuries)

    1 in 400,000 (Now thats something to think about) :)

    2.Write down your worst fears in relation to your thunderstorm phobia, and ask yourself What would you do if they came true? Most often you will realise that the consequences wouldn't be so bad and you will have the ability to handle anything that comes your way.As a result you will no longer feel afraid of the possibilities.

    3. Rather than worrying about 'What might happen' take a few minutes to figure out what the best and worst possible scenerios would be and come up with some ideas about how you would handle them ,if they did happen.

    4. You will not like this one :( But I have been taught to face the fear,although I feel all those terrible symptoms I have to stay with it and not run away.I am at the moment practising this on my course.It is scary,horrible and upsetting, but we will never get over our fears if we dont face them.

    5. Running away from a distressing situation is a natural reaction, and comforting in the short-term as it removes you from the source of your anxiety.But it prevents you from learning how to cope.Unless you tacke a situation,you will never get the chance to see that you can cope with it. ( This one I know is really hard,I am in the same boat as you but i have a very deepset anxiety going on,We have to really really try and to fight these horrible feelings.It wont be an overnight cure but we can get there if we really practise)

    Hope this has helped a bit donna,It's going to be very unpleasant,but also remember you are not alone and I wish you well.Please free to PM me if you want to talk.

    Take care now and try,try and try not to worry. ;):)

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    Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

    Astraphobia also known as Brontophobia, Ceraunophobia, or Tonitrophobia is fear of thunder and lightning.

    It is especially common in young children.

    Symptoms (similar for all other extreme phobias) include panic attack, difficulty in breathing, rapid heartbeat, sweaty palms, and nausea. Sometimes these feelings can be overwhelming.

    The phobia is extremely common. It can be totally debillitating.

    An astraphobic on a BBC message board wrote this about their phobia:

    "I hate summer because I have a thunderstorm phobia. I am constantly on edge from May to September and can only start to relax once the cooler weather comes along in autumn. I get worse after each storm and am usually a nervous wreck at the end of summer. I am now obsessed with thunderstorms and am already dreading next summer."

    Many people try to cope with their fear by hiding. Children typically hide in windowless places, such as the cupboard under the stairs, or under the bed. (Anywhere where they can't see or hear the storm).

    Treatment for Astraphobia is similar for that of all other phobias. Exposure to the stimulus is the most effective treatment but deliberate slow breathing can help as in some cases can hypnotherapy.

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    Posted
  • Location: Cambridgeshire Fens. 3m ASL
  • Location: Cambridgeshire Fens. 3m ASL
    hi,,, you've just described me above, :lol: though my doctor called it astraphobia,and how do i cope???

    I'm forever watching forecasts, netweather radar as i 'm better if i'm warned than if a storm suprises me. in a storm itself everything i have ever learnt about storms goes out the window and i'm determined lightning gonna get me, i have all lights on,curtains shut and when i can't cope anymore i bring the kids downstairs-no matter what hour- which i hate doing ,but have too

    I've always had this phobia and it often spoils summer events as if there may be a chance of storm we won't go.

    Luckily my children ,thanks to my husband love storms and laugh at their silly mum !!

    i've tried everything to cure myself ,learning etc,forcing to look out the window,, but nothing works as all rational thoughts go out window when in storm :lol:

    any one got any suggestions?????

    Get a lightning detector. You can get portable one's so you could still go out and get a good warning of approaching storms.

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    I must have the opposite of this phobia as one of my mothers favourite storys is finding me standing under a tree during a thunderstorm when I was about 4 years old, when she asked me why I was, I apparently replied that I wanted to know what it felt like to be struck by lightning!

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    Posted
  • Location: 14m als, Clacton-on Sea,NE Essex
  • Location: 14m als, Clacton-on Sea,NE Essex

    hi Jane- louise

    thanks for your ideas,, i'll certainly try a few of those, in reality i know my chances of being struck etc, but i just get it in my head during a storm itself i'm total irrational.

    The perfect place i can be in a storm is in a cellar, with no windows but with some kind of wireless pc which i can still watch radars etc,and if i can't have that a different town or country which wasn't having a storm :)

    With it turning to Autumn now and no hot summer storms i am starting to relax until next year

    Grey owl,,, sounds like a good idea to me :)

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    Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

    Apparetnly Astraphobia is especially common among toddlers and young children, though teens and adults can also experience this fear

    Symptoms are similar to other phobias and are usually manifested when certain storm conditions become evident. Children might be upset by the dark clouds or sound of thunder and may become increasingly upset as a storm continues.

    Symptoms of Astraphobia can be breathing difficulty, panic attacks, rapid heartbeat, nausea and sweating. These symptoms can manifest themselves in the form of a tantrum or fit, and might be easy to dismiss as such although a genuine phobia can cause the aforementioned feelings to be completely overwhelming. Children may act out as a result of not being able to cope with these symptoms and knowledge of why they are happening.

    Coping Mechanisms

    Parents can often help their children and teach them proper coping skills by explaining how helpful it can be to retire to a room inside the home where it is more difficult to hear the storm or witness lightning. Older children might be comforted by knowing the actual causes of thunder and lightning and how such phenomenon occur.

    Treatment

    Although certain drugs can be prescribed to calm sufferers of Astraphobia, exposure to the stimulus is thought to be the most effective treatment. Slow even breathing, such as those practiced in lamaze classes, can help as well in some cases.

    Books and Resources

    Many children’s books have been written on the subject of storms. Reading them might help to understand storms and thereby help children to better cope. Some of them include:

    The Storm Book by Charlotte Zolotow (Ages 3 to :)

    Thunder and Lightning: They’re Not So Frightening by JD Schmith (Ages 5 to 10)

    Franklin and the Thunderstorm by Paulette Bourgeois (Ages 4 to :)

    Rumble and Bolt: A Comforting Story About Thunder & Lightning (Board book)by Gary Currant (Ages 4 to 8)

    Retrieved from "http://wikiparenting.parentsconnect.com/wiki/Astraphobia:Fear_of_Thunder%2C_Lightning_and_Storms"

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheltenham,Glos
  • Weather Preferences: Thunderstorms :D
  • Location: Cheltenham,Glos
    I must have the opposite of this phobia as one of my mothers favourite storys is finding me standing under a tree during a thunderstorm when I was about 4 years old, when she asked me why I was, I apparently replied that I wanted to know what it felt like to be struck by lightning!

    lol :)

    Apparetnly Astraphobia is especially common among toddlers and young children, though teens and adults can also experience this fear

    Symptoms are similar to other phobias and are usually manifested when certain storm conditions become evident. Children might be upset by the dark clouds or sound of thunder and may become increasingly upset as a storm continues.

    Symptoms of Astraphobia can be breathing difficulty, panic attacks, rapid heartbeat, nausea and sweating. These symptoms can manifest themselves in the form of a tantrum or fit, and might be easy to dismiss as such although a genuine phobia can cause the aforementioned feelings to be completely overwhelming. Children may act out as a result of not being able to cope with these symptoms and knowledge of why they are happening.

    Coping Mechanisms

    Parents can often help their children and teach them proper coping skills by explaining how helpful it can be to retire to a room inside the home where it is more difficult to hear the storm or witness lightning. Older children might be comforted by knowing the actual causes of thunder and lightning and how such phenomenon occur.

    Treatment

    Although certain drugs can be prescribed to calm sufferers of Astraphobia, exposure to the stimulus is thought to be the most effective treatment. Slow even breathing, such as those practiced in lamaze classes, can help as well in some cases.

    Books and Resources

    Many children's books have been written on the subject of storms. Reading them might help to understand storms and thereby help children to better cope. Some of them include:

    The Storm Book by Charlotte Zolotow (Ages 3 to :)

    Thunder and Lightning: They're Not So Frightening by JD Schmith (Ages 5 to 10)

    Franklin and the Thunderstorm by Paulette Bourgeois (Ages 4 to 8)

    Rumble and Bolt: A Comforting Story About Thunder & Lightning (Board book)by Gary Currant (Ages 4 to :)

    Retrieved from "http://wikiparenting.parentsconnect.com/wiki/Astraphobia:Fear_of_Thunder%2C_Lightning_and_Storms"

    Not a very nice phobia at all especially for the little ones. 8)

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    Posted
  • Location: Midleton, Cork, Ireland
  • Location: Midleton, Cork, Ireland
    Get a lightning detector. You can get portable one's so you could still go out and get a good warning of approaching storms.

    I dont think I'd recommend a portable lightning such as a Strikealert for someone with Brontophobia. Lots of things can cause false strike alerts on these, such as the type of clothing your wearing (if you carry it around), mobile phones, the indicators in my car will give me < 6Mile strike for example. Still handy to have though, just beware.

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    Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

    Not a phobia, but a possible link to increased asthma attacks during storms?

    Researchers have uncovered further evidence of a link between thunderstorms and asthma attacks.

    The American study, which was published in the journal Thorax, looked at more than 10 million emergency hospital visits during an 11 year period in the city of Atlanta and found that asthma related hospital visits were 3% higher on days that followed thunderstorms than on days that did not.

    That figure may not sound like much, but in a country with millions of people such as the UK, it could translate into thousands of cases - and possibly many deaths. This increased risk during volatile weather means it is even more important for people with asthma to keep their asthma medicines with them.

    During thunderstorms downdraughts of cold air sweep up high concentrations of pollen and spores. These allergenic particles are then thrust into the air, where the moisture breaks them up into pieces that can penetrate deep into the lungs, which can induce attacks even in those who have previously only had mild asthma. During thunderstorms it is therefore best to stay inside and close windows to keep allergens out.

    With thunderstorms happening every summer, Asthma UK has offered important advice to the 5.2 million people in the UK with asthma.

    Vikki Knowles, Clinical Lead at Asthma UK said: ‘Unfortunately we can’t control the weather but by taking the right steps early enough we can certainly help to control asthma symptoms. Having a personal asthma action plan can really help, showing you how to increase your asthma medicines safely if you notice your symptoms getting worse. If you do not already have a plan you can get one from your doctor or asthma nurse.'

    For people with asthma who suffer from a range of seasonal triggers Asthma Trigger Tips offers people with asthma tailored information and advice to help them effectively manage their condition during seasonal changes.

    Source: www.asthma.org.uk

    Link to the MetO for a .pdf document download: http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/health/feature...torm_asthma.pdf

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    • 1 year later...
    Posted
  • Location: leicester
  • Location: leicester

    I think I missed this one NSSC!

    I too don't like the thought of people being mocked for phobia afflictions - when I was younger, I was certainly what I'd call a brontophobe. Thunderstorms petrified me (thunder, not so much the lightning) to the extent I'd have shaking fits, be in tears or more often the case, both!

    But to be honest, I don't detect this intolerance of brontophobes. I personally would be very surprised if I'm the only fanatic on here, who is one from overcoming their morbid fear of storms.

    No your not the only one Harry! I too was petrified when i was younger but now i get quite excited when i know theirs a storm about. I don't post much because i don't understand the models much but i enjoy coming on here to see what's happening.

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    Posted
  • Location: UK
  • Location: UK

    when I was younger, I was certainly what I'd call a brontophobe

    I wouldn't class myself as phobic of storms, but I am wary of them nowadays. When I was younger I used to sit outside watching them go over, now I don't like being outside when there are storms around, because when I was younger lightning hit the roof between my parents and neighbours house, I was upstairs at the time, I've never heard such a loud/crack bang in my life, I fell to the floor in fright. The lightning travelled down the aerial and electrical sockets in the house, blew the aerial socket off the lounge wall, blew up my computer and blew out my neighbours aerial socket and set fire to their lounge curtain!. Now I watch storms from the window and still enjoy them love the lightning and thunder and downpours, but wouldn't want to be out in it.

    I have a strong phobia of insects, particularly crane flies

    I'm not phobic of crane flies but as far as I'm concerned they're like flying spiders, they just come at you with their legs trailing behind, urgh, I don't actually mind them flying around the room or sitting on the wall but not when they fly into my face!.

    Clouds are building here:

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    Posted
  • Location: Bedworth , 5 Miles North Of Coventry , 3 Miles South Of Nuneaton
  • Location: Bedworth , 5 Miles North Of Coventry , 3 Miles South Of Nuneaton

    Brontophobia:

    An abnormal and persistent fear of thunder that causes undue anxiety even though sufferers realize that thunder itself poses no threat to them. When outdoors during a thunderstorm, they may suffer excessive anxiety. When indoors, they may hide under beds or desks, behind sofas, or in closets.

    A thunder storm is most often a mild event. Even in the loudest of conditions, the thunder storm is nothing that can cause physical harm to a person. But in the case of Brontophobia, the person feels as though they are in some sort of danger when they hear the thunder storm clapping or when a thunder storm is going to occur. The person with the fear of a thunder storm will react differently to the thunder storm based upon where they are, physically, when the thunder storm is taking place.Thunder storm phobia

    When out of doors, the person with the fear of the thunder storm may find themselves dealing with very high levels of anxiety. These feelings of anxiety related to the thunder storm can cause physical effects on the body. During times of immense anxiety, the fight or flight response will be initiated. This response is a natural response to a situation that threatens harm on the person fearing the thunder storm. The pupils will dilate in order for vision to be improved. The lungs will open up and the heart rate will increase in order to prepare the body to run. The blood pressure will raise in order to adapt to the running that is about to occur and the blood from the extremities will drain in order to reduce bleeding during the fight.When inside during the thunder storm, the reactions of the body will be the same, but the thunder storm sounds will cause the person to physically hide as if they are in danger. They may climb under a table, hide under a blanket or run into a closet in order to escape the impending sense of doom associated with the fear of the thunder storm.

    While many believe the fear of a thunder storm is left for the youngest of children, adults are the most common sufferers of this very real social anxiety based condition. The Brontophobia will often be observed avoiding all activities out of doors when the chance of a thunder storm is on the horizon. Medical attention can help the Brontophobic sufferer to regain the control that the fear of a thunder storm takes away.

    "Brontophobia" is derived from the Greek "bronte" (thunder) and "phobos" (fear). This same Greek word has given us the English word "brontometer," an instrument for recording the activity of thunderstorms.

    The Common Symptoms Of Brontophobia

    Some of the common symptoms of Brontophobia incorporate panic attack, rapid heart beat, sweaty palms, nausea and much more.

    What is more, the phobia is debilitating and so you may get very weak and find it hard to concentrate on the work that you do.

    The treatments for this kind of phobia include traditional cognitive behavioral therapy like counter-conditioning, flooding, gradual exposure therapy and much more.

    While this method claims success, it involves a great deal of mental pain. It also requires frequent therapy sessions over several weeks.

    Traditional therapy, in which you sit or lie down and tell your problems to a therapist, takes months or years to bring relief, and the results are quite unpredictable.

    This Describes Me Exactly But So Far This Year Most Storms Have Only Skirted My Location So I Have Had A Relatively Calm Summer Which I hope Continues

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    Posted
  • Location: Redhill, Surrey
  • Location: Redhill, Surrey

    I wouldn't say I used to have a phobia of storms but I had a great dislike of them, but thanks to my dad forcing me to watch out for lightning to show me how beautiful it was, the dislike was overcome by the want of seeing or photographing it.

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    Posted
  • Location: south London
  • Location: south London

    I wouldn't say I used to have a phobia of storms but I had a great dislike of them, but thanks to my dad forcing me to watch out for lightning to show me how beautiful it was, the dislike was overcome by the want of seeing or photographing it.

    same here Louby....my dad did child abuse :lol: got me to sit on a window and wathced a lightning storm in the year of our lord 1772....sorry I mean 1972..

    though Im gratefull to him now :lol:

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    Posted
  • Location: Norwich
  • Location: Norwich

    I remember being scared by them as a small kid, but nowadays I simply love them (that is whenever they materialise in this country :lol:). I guess I have grown to accept them and now I consider them a treat to some extent.

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    Posted
  • Location: Sunderland
  • Weather Preferences: Hot Summer, Snowy winter and thunderstorms all year round!
  • Location: Sunderland

    yep, used to be terrified of 'em as a nipper....now they're terrified of me, as I haven't seen one skulking around here for ages

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    Posted
  • Location: Redhill, Surrey
  • Location: Redhill, Surrey

    same here Louby....my dad did child abuse :lol: got me to sit on a window and wathced a lightning storm in the year of our lord 1772....sorry I mean 1972..

    though Im gratefull to him now :lol:

    Yep sat at window for me too, watching the storms bounce between north and south downs.

    That storm of 1972 was cause by the earth rebelling against me being born :lol:

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    Guest North Sea Snow Convection

    I feel as though I have been in a sense been sort of punished for not being 'careful for what I wished for'.

    I used to get really excited about thunderstorms and get frustrated if I missed them. I had seen some big storms of course when I was younger and one them was quite scary and flooded out the whole of my office at work with at least one lightning strike hitting right next to the building in early afternoon darkness. But at the time the whole event was an awesome experience and I never thought of what harm could have been done.

    The big storm the other year though is where the rot has set in, despite personally having a lucky escape. I know a few people who really suffered big damage to their houses with a few having to deal also with house fires, smashed windows, no electricity and bad flooding. I have seen how upset and distressed first hand they have been and it really hit hard home to me.

    So thinking on from all that, in terms of my own situation it has now brought home to me just how vulnerable I would be if that happened to me. The impications terrify me! Not just in the usual ways - In this household there are five large aquariums with several hundred litres of water in them and i live in dread with the image of them bursting, quite apart from the loss of livestock which are also worth a few hundred pounds (as well as being family pets) Being without electriicity alone is a huge threat in terms of the filters and equipment not working and polluted water which is a big risk for weeks after reconnection and woould need round the clock maintenance and changing of gallons and gallons of water. I often wish that I was aware of this before agreeing to have the tanks installed. There is no way I would have done it. But then I was a storm fan then and wouldn't have given it a thought!.

    I can live though with the usual inconveniences of no hot water (heating outside of summer) etc for a while that are the usual issues. Even being without a computer for a little while.But damge. fire, and the above issue are very different.

    In this respect, I have already nearly lived out my personal nightmare. One other storm during this recent times produced a huge crackling from the mains socket of one the main tanks as a large strike just missed the house. I thought that the worst nightmare had come true and was waiting for the glass and water to go flying..... Nothing happened, but I was physically shaking, frightened and upset for some time afterwards..This has pretty much got hold of me now and I dread any storm coming anywhere near. It feels (rather irrationally I know) that every storm that comes is a reminder of once not being 'careful for what I wished for'.

    Away from home, i daresay I would still be able to enjoy the build of the clouds and the spectacle of the storm, much I used to. But I would have to be in an indoor place and would still (now) be very nervous of the lightning. It could be that I still wouldn't be able to deal with it as it would be a reminder of what could potentially happen at home.

    So I guess I am a case of someone who has done the brontophobe bit in reverse.

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    Posted
  • Location: Cambridge, NY!! (151m) 496ft ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Supernova hot summers with mega lightning storms, and SNOWMAGGEDON WINTERS!
  • Location: Cambridge, NY!! (151m) 496ft ASL

    I think I missed this one NSSC!

    I too don't like the thought of people being mocked for phobia afflictions - when I was younger, I was certainly what I'd call a brontophobe. Thunderstorms petrified me (thunder, not so much the lightning) to the extent I'd have shaking fits, be in tears or more often the case, both!

    But to be honest, I don't detect this intolerance of brontophobes. I personally would be very surprised if I'm the only fanatic on here, who is one from overcoming their morbid fear of storms.

    One thing I do find somewhat frustrating, is when people who clearly have a fear of storms, post on the thread which is dedicated to storms and their brilliance. I would be one of the first to volunteer any help I could, to turn around peoples phobia of storms, which by some fluke really I managed to do for me...but that help never appears to be asked - just a casual moan or whinge about something which 99% of the contributors to that particular thread are obsessed with. I have a strong phobia of insects, particularly crane flies, moths and birds (if in an enclosed room which I had the unfortunate horror of dealing with last week). I got ribbed in the States for my phobia of crane flies and the like, but that can only be expected. Who wouldn't find funny the site of a young 6ft lad, launching out of a room at the site of a flimsy, gangly, harmless stick dancing clumsily and harmlessly through the air? My phobia of crane flies and moths is no different to anyone's phobia of thunder/lightning...yet I do accept a certain degree of ridicule, because it helps me deal with it and really, can only be expected!

    Driving in the snow scares me as well, and I dread the forecast which says several inches of snow is on the way, because effectively I'm house bound - I don't like walking in it either as I always seem to go over. Yet when many forum members are getting excited by the prospect of the white stuff, I don't go into the thread and disrupt the flow by having a whinge about how driving in the snow scares me, and how my life becomes a mess because of it! Normally there's a separate whinging thread to which I vent my frustrations :lol: I wouldn't expect many posts reading "awww, poor Harry" while everyone else is bursting with excitement at the thought of snow!

    Give and take IMO - if I read a post which seriously mocked someones phobia, I'd be the first to launch a scathing attack back, because that's the gobby sod I am - yet in all fairness, I don't recall seeing one. But equally, I think some of the worst things in life can be cured with comedy and having a laugh...not AT someone, but AT the thing which is causing them so many problems! I try and overcome my fears of insects by reading up about them, different species, effectively making my interest in them be a positive one rather than striking fear.

    In conclusion, I really don't think there is a problem on this thread with sniggering comments etc.

    Guess what! You're not the only one on here that was a brontophobe when they were a child- I was too!!!!!!!!!! I grew up in New Jersey and in the late 70s we had horrendous TERRIBLE, most frightning storms, and I would get hysterical. I would have to hide in the bathroom with my fingers in my ears (as it was mainly the thunder not the lightning) and shut my eyes if it was dark due to power cut, because the lightning was so intense. The summer of 77 was the WORST, I was 3 and I remember that summer so vividly. We also had hurricane David that year. We would get severe storms about every 2 days and sometimes 2 or 3 a night. I HATED going to bed, because I KNEW Id wake up to storms, and just go into a fit. This phobia created a morbid fascination with storms for me. Since as long as I can remember I have always dreamed of tornadoes and violent storms (to this day!) and my fear became an exhilarating love for storms now. I must say though, now- when I get my once a year storm here in Nottingham, I am totally exhilarated and excited but still a bit scared if it looks like its gonna be mean. I ALWAYS have ear plugs in (never got over that one :lol:) and my heart races a million miles an hour as I have my face and camera smashed against the window hahahaha!! Storms here arent as bad as they were back in New Jersey, so I never get too scared, but back at home, I dare say I would be one huge contrasting emotion!! I would be sooooo excited and like YEAH!!! and then as the storm got intense I would be pretty scared too all at the same time!! I am so glad I love them now though. I miss them! Its been so dry here this summer :lol:

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    Guest North Sea Snow Convection

    Although I enjoy it at any time of year, whatever the weather, I thoroughly recommend shopping as a perfect remedy for avoiding storms. The peaceful and quiet sound boothed environments of Waterstones browsing books with the coffee shop next it and looking round Dotty P's on Wednesday afternoon meant that the elements were totally shut out and when I had finished the weather had cleared and the sun was shining brightly again. Seems from talking, a lot of other people had the same idea as me!

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    • 2 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Bedworth , 5 Miles North Of Coventry , 3 Miles South Of Nuneaton
  • Location: Bedworth , 5 Miles North Of Coventry , 3 Miles South Of Nuneaton

    I really am praying this does not hit me dead on as I have trouble dealing with the weakest of storms never mind the intensity of all lot over South Wales

    Hope it misses me

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    Posted
  • Location: Bexley (home), C London (work)
  • Weather Preferences: Thunderstorms
  • Location: Bexley (home), C London (work)

    I really am praying this does not hit me dead on as I have trouble dealing with the weakest of storms never mind the intensity of all lot over South Wales

    Hope it misses me

    If it comes close, whack your iPod/some headphones in and drown it out. If you don't own any, may I suggest investing in some and maybe downloading some Enya (what I'm listening to at work to keep the stress levels down :whistling:) - works wonders! :D

    It's what I did when I was younger and having panic attacks - now I'm, put simply, an absolute nutter :)

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