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What are the best books on thunderstorms?


dave48

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Posted
  • Location: Godalming, Surrey
  • Location: Godalming, Surrey

    I have read a number of books on weather now, mostly the typical sort of general weather books you might buy at Waterstones. Does anyone know of any good higher level books, what I suppose would be sort of undergraduate level books that have useful sections on thunderstorm forecasting in them? Thanks.

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheltenham,Glos
  • Weather Preferences: Thunderstorms :D
  • Location: Cheltenham,Glos

    Hi Dave,

    I have been looking on Amazon UK for you and came up with these:

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_ss_w_h_/2...p;x=18&y=15

    Of course,you would have to choose the type you are looking for.

    They've got one book in there, and I had to laugh, at the price lol

    called :

    Forecasting of Hail, Thunderstorms and Showers by G.K. Sulakvelidze and it cost £101.74 ;)

    I have a book called

    Lightning Strikes staying safe under stormy Skies by Jeff Renner. (Seattle Wa)

    Here is part of what's written on the back:

    Lightning kills more people in North America than any other weather phenomenon, including tornadoes,hurricanes and floods. If you work outdoors or simply enjoy being outdoors-whether hiking,camping,or teeing off on the golf course-this book is for you.Learn about the risks of lightning,thunderstorms winds,and flash floods;discover how to safe using the four As of thunderstorm safety (Anticipate,Assess,Act and Aid)

    Includes Lightning lore and myths,anecdotes and lightning survival stories.

    This is a very good read ,very interesting :) and I bought it from amazon.

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    Posted
  • Location: City of Gales, New Zealand, 150m ASL
  • Location: City of Gales, New Zealand, 150m ASL

    That's a pretty typical price for an academic book. ;)

    Bear in mind that meteorology is physics. That means any sort of academic meteorological textbook you pick up will be fairly heavy on the maths. You cannot address thunderstorms without at least implicitly also addressing thermodynamics, they are joined together firmly at the hip. Unfortunately, in my opinion, thermodynamics itself is really quite boring, and also conceptually difficult to handle at times, even without considering the maths. But, it is one of the most useful things you can learn in physics.

    I would really look at something addressing atmospheric thermodynamics and then dynamic meteorology, otherwise the thunderstorm forecasting stuff will be built "on foundations of sand". Calculus is absolutely essential for a serious understanding of everything mentioned above.

    I don't know your background so sorry if this covers what you know already.

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