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Will Aleutian volcanic dust clouds bring a colder winter?


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Posted
  • Location: Western Isle of Wight
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, Storm, anything loud and dramatic.
  • Location: Western Isle of Wight

A volcano went off recently in the Aleutian Islands USA. It has created some good looking sunsets. Will this and other recent volcanic eruptions have any influence on our weather. Or will it take something bigger?

See RELENTLESS KASATOCHI; in this site. http://www.spaceweather.com/

(Mods, I am fine as to whether this is a topic or just a question in a thread, if I need putting somewhere, N/P :( )

Russ

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Posted
  • Location: Rossland BC Canada
  • Location: Rossland BC Canada

I don't think it is a large enough dust veil yet to have much impact on temperatures. I live a lot closer to the source here, and have been seeing the odd formation of dust drifting overhead during clear weather recently. But it would take a fairly large eruption to make much impact on this winter's temperature pattern. That's not to say it won't be a colder winter, but if so, other reasons will have to be found, I believe.

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Posted
  • Location: Western Isle of Wight
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, Storm, anything loud and dramatic.
  • Location: Western Isle of Wight

Thanks RJ, I had an Idea it was slight, but being unused to the subject I felt I had to ask.

Seeing the pictures on Spaceweather and reading the vapor had circumnavigated the globe, I was even more curious of the subject.

I believe Mount St Helen's eruption 1980 caused a slightly colder spell, I live in hope. Plus I have several hundreds of tons of firewood for sale :unknw:

kind regards.

Russ

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Guest Shetland Coastie

Hi all. The eruption at Kastochi is now winding down, with little in the way of eruptive activity over the past several days and Alaskan Volcanos Observatory downgrading the alert state to Yellow. The main cloud from the eruptions was actually emitted in the early hours as this was fairly explosive and contained relatively high leves of SO2.

It has now been estimated that this release of SO2 into the stratosphere was the highest since the Cerro Hudson eruption in 1991. Due to the larger eruption at Pinatubo that year, little was heard of in the news about Cerro Hudson, which is in a remote part of Chile, however there is now no doubt the the SO2 emitted by the volcano played its part in the global cooling that followed both eruptions.

Below is a graph of SO2 emitted by various volcanos, you will find Hudson right next to the line for Pinatubo. The amount emitted by Kasatochi would be just short of that emitted by Hudson.

post-4448-1220824909_thumb.png

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Posted
  • Location: Western Isle of Wight
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, Storm, anything loud and dramatic.
  • Location: Western Isle of Wight

Cheers mate, on the strength of that I'll keep some in reserve ;)

Mucho kindo regardo.

Russ

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Posted
  • Location: Hayward’s Heath - home, Brighton/East Grinstead - work.
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and storms
  • Location: Hayward’s Heath - home, Brighton/East Grinstead - work.
Hi all. The eruption at Kastochi is now winding down, with little in the way of eruptive activity over the past several days and Alaskan Volcanos Observatory downgrading the alert state to Yellow. The main cloud from the eruptions was actually emitted in the early hours as this was fairly explosive and contained relatively high leves of SO2.

It has now been estimated that this release of SO2 into the stratosphere was the highest since the Cerro Hudson eruption in 1991. Due to the larger eruption at Pinatubo that year, little was heard of in the news about Cerro Hudson, which is in a remote part of Chile, however there is now no doubt the the SO2 emitted by the volcano played its part in the global cooling that followed both eruptions.

Below is a graph of SO2 emitted by various volcanos, you will find Hudson right next to the line for Pinatubo. The amount emitted by Kasatochi would be just short of that emitted by Hudson.

post-4448-1220824909_thumb.png

That graph is a little bit deceptive and I had to look twice! At first it looks like the eruption of Pinotubo was only slightly greater in terms of SO2 release than that of Hudson. A closer inspection of the left hand scale shows in fact that the eruption of Pinotubo was 5 times greater than that of Hudson.

Is there any exact formula that can link ppm SO2 in the atmosphere to a precise reduction in global temperature?

c

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