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craig1uk

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Posted
  • Location: Milton Keynes
  • Location: Milton Keynes

    Thanks for having a look into the topic, hope you'll be able to give some advice.

    I am a complete novice, drawn towards the weather extremes, and hope one day to join up with the chasers in the us.

    I'm looking to find out more about the fundementals, ordered a few text books ect, and thinking about getting a weather station for my back garden, and here's where I need the advice, I am in a built up area, and don't believe that I would get true wind speeds in between all the houses and can't go very high with any sensors, so....

    is it worth spending out on a decent station, that might not be used to its full potential, or go for a cheaper general station just looking at temps, dew points, rainfall ect ?

    Any advice will be well received, product endorsements ect, cheers guys.

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    Posted
  • Location: Barnet, North London
  • Location: Barnet, North London

    Even in your situation Craig, I'd still go for a station with an anemometer. Although data will be less precise than mounting the anemometer in the ideal spot, you should be able to pick out interesting trends in the wind. As you progressively learn more, you will understand that changes in wind speed and direction are closely tied to the different segments of weather systems, and can give you big clues for local weather conditions in the hours forthcoming. I'd recommend Davis weather stations if you are thinking of going serious, failing that then Oregon Scientific, although I have heard their units tend to need more maintenance & repairs.

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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts
  • Weather Preferences: Rain/snow, fog, gales and cold in every season
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts

    I'd also recommend Davis. I bought a Davis 'Weather Wizard 2' , as a back up to the standard station, in 1996 and mounted the sensors on a 20 foot mast on the house roof.

    It's had some serious hammer since then as we get frequent gales, icing, rime, clogging with snow etc, but the anemometer head lasted 11 years before it needed replacing. The temperature sensor ( housed in a mini plastic radiation screen, which I'd also recommend ) is still as good as it was on the day I bought it.

    I would think in a relatively sheltered location the anemometer would last over 20 years.

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    • 4 months later...
    Posted
  • Location: Newbury Berkshire
  • Location: Newbury Berkshire

    Hi hope you don't mind me 'borrowing' your thread craig1uk? {or am i better advised to start a new thread??}

    Basicaly was wondering whats required and what kind of money is invovled in setting up a home 'weather station'.

    Since i am know expert would a more basic 'station' be more suitable until i 'grasp' the technical side of thingswacko.gif , thanks biggrin.gif

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    • 1 month later...
    Posted
  • Location: Edinburgh
  • Location: Edinburgh

    As for textbooks I wouldn't bother, use the secondry and advanced learning guides on the met office website here, they give a good indication and set up of UK weather and its best to start with that., I know the US severe storms are more interesting but something you can watch daily and that is relevent will be easier to learn and provide a good basis to severe storm forcasting. Also check out the learning guides on this site they are excelent and I used them serveral times while revising for my uni exam last year.

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    Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

    £80 - £100 should start you off with a basic station with anemometer and PC connectivity. I generally use mine offline as I don't have the time to maintain a dedicated website to upload the info to or keep any specific records / charts.

    Choice is down to personal preference. Like so many things (white/black goods, cars, restaurants!) everybody has their favourites and you should look at how much money you are willing to spend and how many features you are likely to use. I recommend the Weather Shop in Eastbourne because it's so close, but I can wander in there and look at a full range of gear and ask all the questions in the World!

    As for learning. One of the greatest resources on the web is right here on NW in the learning area and if you have any doubts about information or models etc that are being posted in the various sections of the forum, please ask a team member or PM the poster - they are a very friendly bunch and more than willing to help where possible!

    One external site that I have found recently deals with an area I am very enthusiastic about - storms. Here is a link to a whole load of information that you can digest at your leisure: www.e-education.psu.edu

    Other than that, dive in, read the articles in the NW learning area, ask questions and enjoy! :yahoo:

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