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-2.1c At Noon On The 5th April 1911


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Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam

    During early April 1911, a very cold Arctic airmass spread SWwards towards the UK around an anticyclone and especially affected the SE badly with severe frosts, unusually low maxima for the time of the year and drifting snow.

    Rslp19110405.gif

    Here are some reports from that period.

    4th April 1911

    Walton-on-the-Hill: 4 inches of snow

    Ticehurst: 4 inches of snow

    Lynturk Manse: 1 inch of snow

    5th April 1911

    Hampstead Observatory: -2.1C at noon. Ink froze in the telescope house and also the astronomer's moustache.

    Camden Square: 1 inch of snow, a shade max of 3.4C

    Poplar: 3 inches of snow

    New Malden: 1.75 inches of snow

    Weybridge: Shade max of 1.2C

    Tunbridge Wells: Shade max of -1C

    Ulcombe Place: Shade max of 0C, the lowest since the 29th December 1908

    Detling: 5.5 inches of snow, 6ft drifts

    Rochester: Icicles several feet long hanging from buildings.

    Brighton: 2 inches of snow, a shade max of 1C, a football match between Brighton and Hove Albion and West Ham was postponed because of snow.

    Oakley: Violent blizzard

    Southgate: Shade max of 1.5C

    Blisworth: Terrific snowstorms and gales in afternoon

    Buxton: 2 inches of snow

    West Witton: 3 inches of snow

    Hildenborough: 6 inches of snow

    Chatham: Motor mail coaches stook in snow between Chatham and Sittingbourne

    Hampton Poyle: Enormous damage done to apricot trees and roses

    6th April 1911

    North Cadbury: Shade max of 3.6C

    Wirksworth: 1 inch of snow

    Camden Square: a shade min of -3.6C

    7th April 1911

    Poplar: 3 inches of snow

    The CET daily mean

    5th April 1911: 0.4

    6th April 1911: 0.8

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    Posted
  • Location: Windermere 120m asl
  • Location: Windermere 120m asl

    Some impressively cold temperatures for so late in the 'winter season'. I recall early April 1917 also delivering some very cold air with a deep arctic plunge...

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    • 2 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Clitheroe, N.Lancs
  • Location: Clitheroe, N.Lancs

    According to Woodward & Penn 'The Wrong Kind of Snow' the snow and wind on the 5th April 1911 brought down the Huntingdon Wych Elm at Magdalen College, Oxford, reputedly the tallest tree in Britain, with a height of 142ft and a trunk circumference of 27ft, and had stood for more than four centuries.

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    Posted
  • Location: Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
  • Weather Preferences: Sunshine and 15-25c
  • Location: Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
    I recall early April 1917 also delivering some very cold air with a deep arctic plunge...

    wow you must be knocking on?...telegram from the queen yet?

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    Posted
  • Location: Wildwood, Stafford 104m asl
  • Weather Preferences: obviously snow!
  • Location: Wildwood, Stafford 104m asl
    During early April 1911, a very cold Arctic airmass spread SWwards towards the UK around an anticyclone and especially affected the SE badly with severe frosts, unusually low maxima for the time of the year and drifting snow.

    Rslp19110405.gif

    Here are some reports from that period.

    4th April 1911

    Walton-on-the-Hill: 4 inches of snow

    Ticehurst: 4 inches of snow

    Lynturk Manse: 1 inch of snow

    5th April 1911

    Hampstead Observatory: -2.1C at noon. Ink froze in the telescope house and also the astronomer's moustache.

    Camden Square: 1 inch of snow, a shade max of 3.4C

    Poplar: 3 inches of snow

    New Malden: 1.75 inches of snow

    Weybridge: Shade max of 1.2C

    Tunbridge Wells: Shade max of -1C

    Ulcombe Place: Shade max of 0C, the lowest since the 29th December 1908

    Detling: 5.5 inches of snow, 6ft drifts

    Rochester: Icicles several feet long hanging from buildings.

    Brighton: 2 inches of snow, a shade max of 1C, a football match between Brighton and Hove Albion and West Ham was postponed because of snow.

    Oakley: Violent blizzard

    Southgate: Shade max of 1.5C

    Blisworth: Terrific snowstorms and gales in afternoon

    Buxton: 2 inches of snow

    West Witton: 3 inches of snow

    Hildenborough: 6 inches of snow

    Chatham: Motor mail coaches stook in snow between Chatham and Sittingbourne

    Hampton Poyle: Enormous damage done to apricot trees and roses

    6th April 1911

    North Cadbury: Shade max of 3.6C

    Wirksworth: 1 inch of snow

    Camden Square: a shade min of -3.6C

    7th April 1911

    Poplar: 3 inches of snow

    The CET daily mean

    5th April 1911: 0.4

    6th April 1911: 0.8

    Walton on the Hill, you mean by me? or is there another walton on the hill, only around half a mile away from me lol, might have known it was 1911, dont get any now

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    • 1 year later...
    • 9 years later...
    Posted
  • Location: Cheshire
  • Location: Cheshire

    All the more remarkable because July & August 1911 were the hottest high summers (CET) between 1659 and 1983 (Eden) and this led to much industrial strife in the UK. I wonder what we can expect next Monday, 5th April 2021, exactly 110 years on?! 

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