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Moss In Your Lawn...


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Posted
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL

    I might have asked this question last year, but hey ho.

    Our lawn is a little bit of a mess, but not too bad.

    The problem we are having is that within our grass, we have quite copious amounts of moss.

    I've tried a few times to get rid of the moss, sow new grass and feed the lawn. However, it has failed 12 months later on, and the moss is still there.

    Does anybody have any tips on how to get rid of the moss, and grow the grass (any specific varieties etc)? Any methods for doing this?

    FI - We have basically used a branded moss killer, and also used a couple of different brands of grass seed.

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    Posted
  • Location: Swallownest, Sheffield 83m ASL
  • Location: Swallownest, Sheffield 83m ASL

    Hiya Chris.. Best thing I can think of is to rake it out, aerate the lawn and then reseed. I use a general seed mix because its hard wearing.

    Hope that helps mate. :rolleyes:

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    Posted
  • Location: Canada
  • Location: Canada
    I might have asked this question last year, but hey ho.

    Our lawn is a little bit of a mess, but not too bad.

    The problem we are having is that within our grass, we have quite copious amounts of moss.

    I've tried a few times to get rid of the moss, sow new grass and feed the lawn. However, it has failed 12 months later on, and the moss is still there.

    Does anybody have any tips on how to get rid of the moss, and grow the grass (any specific varieties etc)? Any methods for doing this?

    FI - We have basically used a branded moss killer, and also used a couple of different brands of grass seed.

    Get a good rake and rake out the moss. It should take you a whole day. Get right down to the soil. Then come along with a fork and dig in lifting the said area up about 3 inch,s airating the soil underneath.

    1. The raking of the moss gives the grass a better chance of growing

    2. The lifting of the sod "Mossy Area", airates the soil, drys it out, takes the heavy wet out of it, Moss will only grow in a damp wet area.

    Make sure you do the whole lawn.

    Worst comes to worst. Dig a deep trench down one side of the garden, At least a metre, fill it with small stone or waste stone. Then fill back in. Make sure you dig it on the down slope of the garden. This way the whole lawn area will have a natural drain.

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    Posted
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL

    Thanks Potty.

    I gave it rake last year before putting some seed down, and it seemed to work(ish). Problem is, is that the moss has come back over winter. The grass has already been cut twice, so might need to give it another go.

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    Posted
  • Location: Swallownest, Sheffield 83m ASL
  • Location: Swallownest, Sheffield 83m ASL

    I'd recommend what kippure suggests too. Adding in a drain will help keep moisture levels down.

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and lots of it or warm and sunny, no mediocre dross
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl

    When you've finished spiking it all over with the fork (work the fork back and forth a bit to open up holes) brush in sharp sand; like others have said, poor drainage is the culprit.

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    Posted
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL

    Thanks everyone.

    Actually, because we did a lot of 'landscaping' last summer, we know that for at least half the garden, there is a think layer of clay about 1/2 a foot down. I'm guessing that this is by no means helping the draining of any water (perhaps also the reason why the moss keeps coming back).

    What about some industrial 'stuff'? A bit of feeeerti-lie-zer (trying to do a farmers acent)?

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    Posted
  • Location: Canada
  • Location: Canada
    Thanks everyone.

    Actually, because we did a lot of 'landscaping' last summer, we know that for at least half the garden, there is a think layer of clay about 1/2 a foot down. I'm guessing that this is by no means helping the draining of any water (perhaps also the reason why the moss keeps coming back).

    What about some industrial 'stuff'? A bit of feeeerti-lie-zer (trying to do a farmers acent)?

    You,d have a moss explosion so to speak. The sand is one trick i forgot, How ever there is another way. If your garden is a master peice and dont want to do much destruction. You and drill holes in the lower parts of your lawn done to 3 metres. Like the one,s they use for drill ice. Fill them up with 2.5 metres of stone and compact it dowm with soil.

    About 6 of them would solve your problem.

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    • 2 months later...
    Posted
  • Location: United Kingdom
  • Location: United Kingdom

    Moss is such a sight for sore eyes the thing to try is Copper sulphate or Zinc sulphate which will kill the moss. Spray it on, and it will turn black and die in a couple weeks. There is a product called moss out (can just search on Google). Then you can rake like mad and remove it from the surface of your turf. However, you should be looking at the reason and a cure for this problem. Moss in a turf just doesn't pop in for no reason. You are experiencing a situation that will not allow for a healthy stand of turf to grow, as most mosses will only invade a thin, unhealthy lawn.

    In order to obtain effective control of moss, you must consider the reasons why it began to grow in the lawn in the first place. Attempts to eradicate moss are rarely effective unless there is actively-growing turf to take its place.

    Moss in lawns is usually the result of conditions that are not beneficial to good growth in turf. Moss is usually associated with shallow soils, poor soil fertility, low soil pH (acid soils), heavy shade, and excessive moisture. If any of these conditions are inhibiting turf growth, moss can and will invade the lawn and establish itself. What you should do is get a soil test done and determine the acidity of your growing area. I can almost guarantee that your soil is on the acidic side and will need to be treated with a good application of lime to "sweeten" it up. Not as messy and faster acting). You more than likely have a soil compaction problem as well and need to do a "core aeration" in the spring. Pruning back and removing any tree branches or shrubs that are shading the lawn to allow more sunlight in will also help to stop moss from growing (moss doesn't like sunlight). Good mowing practices need to be on the menu as well. Mowing a turf too low will help moss get established. Most "cool" season turf grasses should be mowed at a height of around 2 to 3". Hopefully you’ll get it sorted good luck

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    Posted
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
  • Weather Preferences: Thunder, snow, heat, sunshine...
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.

    Having tried all the 'cures' above and failed, I've found that swearing at the moss is as good a remedy as any! :lol:

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    Posted
  • Location: St. Albans, Herts
  • Location: St. Albans, Herts

    Or you could always just leave it? Lovely to walk on, loved by nature and used by most of our birds to line their nests.

    Give moss a chance, man :wallbash:

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    Posted
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
  • Weather Preferences: Thunder, snow, heat, sunshine...
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
    Or you could always just leave it? Lovely to walk on, loved by nature and used by most of our birds to line their nests.

    Give moss a chance, man :wallbash:

    I guess that's true, Roo. As it [the moss] never went away - I'd have to live with it??? :diablo:

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    Posted
  • Location: St. Albans, Herts
  • Location: St. Albans, Herts
    I guess that's true, Roo. As it [the moss] never went away - I'd have to live with it??? :help:

    Fab excuse...my lawn is not 'poor', it is 'nature friendly'! :wallbash::diablo:

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    Posted
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
  • Weather Preferences: Thunder, snow, heat, sunshine...
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
    Fab excuse...my lawn is not 'poor', it is 'nature friendly'! :wallbash::diablo:

    That's true Roo (another Country lyric?) Eeh hah??

    But - as a divorcee, and having no 'whatever'- my lawn has long gone! :help:

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    Posted
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland

    I don't use any weedkillers or chemicals on my lawn, just organic fertiliser, but I do scarify it twice a year and aerate it, simply because if I didn't, it would die a death from the kids and their friends trampling on it endlessly.

    3588823878_48a2283dee.jpg

    That's the key - get air down there and take the tatch out. You can get something called terraventing done which is where a probe is placed deep into the soil and nitrogen blasted through which breaks up the clay. The fissures are then filled with something made from seaweed which keeps them open. It works a treat, but is costly. I've only ever used it on areas which were to be adopted by local authoroties.

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and lots of it or warm and sunny, no mediocre dross
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl
    Or you could always just leave it? Lovely to walk on, loved by nature and used by most of our birds to line their nests.

    Give moss a chance, man :rofl:

    Yeah, another thing we agree on! I knew there had to be some things we wouldn't bicker about.

    Love Daisy's in a lawn too.

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    Posted
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
  • Weather Preferences: Thunder, snow, heat, sunshine...
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
    Yeah, another thing we agree on! I knew there had to be some things we wouldn't bicker about.

    Love Daisy's in a lawn too.

    Do you mean 'daisies'? Sorry, see you on Monday! :rofl:

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    Posted
  • Location: Longlevens, 16m ASL / Bradley Stoke, 75m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Hot sunny summers, cold snowy winters
  • Location: Longlevens, 16m ASL / Bradley Stoke, 75m ASL
    Or you could always just leave it? Lovely to walk on, loved by nature and used by most of our birds to line their nests.

    Give moss a chance, man :rofl:

    And the lawn doesnt need to mowed as often :rofl:

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    Posted
  • Location: St. Albans, Herts
  • Location: St. Albans, Herts
    Yeah, another thing we agree on! I knew there had to be some things we wouldn't bicker about.

    Hurrah! :D

    Yes, I am a bit of a moss fan actually...I even have it growing in a pot! Looked at close up, moss and lichen really are fantastic little things.... :rofl::rofl::rofl:

    Have a lovely weekend all...

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