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Posted
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL

    Just wondering if anyone had any advice out there regarding Passion Flowers.

    We got a cutting a couple of years back, and last year got our act together and put up some trellace stuff.

    Looked quite good last year.

    However, this year it is looking rather straggley (is that a word?).

    There are 'branches' pretty much spread over 1.5m across of trellace, but it looks a little bare. There are leaves, but not many.

    I've also noticed that some shoots are starting to come through.

    The question(s) are:

    1. Shall I leave and see what happens

    2. Cut back some of the branches (will this exhibit some new shoots and growth).

    3. Cut right back

    4. Anything else

    Any advice would be appreciated.

    Many Thanks.

    SB1

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and lots of it or warm and sunny, no mediocre dross
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl

    If it's really straggly (yup, that's a real word) then you can prune it hard, back to 30-60 cm, which will encourage new shoots. Prune out any dead or frost damaged shoots first. Usual pruning to keep it tidy is to prune all side shoots back to 15cm or so.

    It's fine to leave it alone, not prune it at all and see what happens, it could just be being slow to wake up after winter - mine bit the dust this year, it was just too cold around here for it to survive. Give yours a good feed of general purpose fertiliser too, that should encourage it to make lots of new growth.

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    Posted
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL

    Thanks Jethro.

    I did trim back the dead sprially things and leaves yesterday, and did notice quite a few new shoots.

    I guess i'm also comapring against a clamatis thats sitting about a meter away, which looekd dead in the autumn, and also grown tremendously in the last few weeks.

    I might give it a few more weeks for the new shoots (this weeks rain should help exhibit some growth), and have another look again.

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    Posted
  • Location: City of Gales, New Zealand, 150m ASL
  • Location: City of Gales, New Zealand, 150m ASL

    OOC, how many fruit do you generally get from a plant this size, and how long do they take to ripen?

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and lots of it or warm and sunny, no mediocre dross
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl

    From this location, grown outdoors - none and none.

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    Posted
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral
  • Weather Preferences: Summer: warm, humid, thundery. Winter: mild, stormy, some snow.
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral

    Passionflower (Passiflora caerulea), will shoot leaves in April to May, and are later than most climbers. I would certainly wait as you will have new leaves before you know it - there's nothing unusual about what you are experiencing. It will become rampant in mid-summer, and don't forget passionflowers bloom around September, so you have plenty of time for foliage to grow back.

    Don't cut back any of the stems with new shoots because Passiflora do not flower on old stems, they only flower on new stems so only cut back old stems (from which leaves will still grow).

    There's two options - of you want a vine that is full of leaves, plant in a moist compost. If you want a plant that is full of flowers, plant in gritty, sandy soil.

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    Posted
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL
    Passionflower (Passiflora caerulea), will shoot leaves in April to May, and are later than most climbers. I would certainly wait as you will have new leaves before you know it - there's nothing unusual about what you are experiencing. It will become rampant in mid-summer, and don't forget passionflowers bloom around September, so you have plenty of time for foliage to grow back.

    Don't cut back any of the stems with new shoots because Passiflora do not flower on old stems, they only flower on new stems so only cut back old stems (from which leaves will still grow).

    There's two options - of you want a vine that is full of leaves, plant in a moist compost. If you want a plant that is full of flowers, plant in gritty, sandy soil.

    Thanks Ste.

    Actually, its planted in our soil, so its located in quite a dry spot. Was quite an impressive display last year, aespecially considering it was a cutting from another plant.

    Its quite amazing thought seeing the effects on the sun for photosynthesis. When the houses were built, the builder put a tree (I dont know what it is) in each garden. The further you go along the road, the more direct sunlight the plant gets during the day (due to shade from larger trees, houses etc).

    Our tree is only just coming into leaf, whilst 2 doors down, their tree has been in full elaf for 1-2 weeks.

    Think i'll wait on the passionflower then. Its a good climber, so want to make the most of last years growth.

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    • 1 month later...
    Posted
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL

    Well, I did what I said, and it has climbed over half the trellice (sp?) which was the intention.

    In fact, its gone mad, but thats exactly what we wanted.

    Lots of flower bulbs too now, and in fact, have a few flowers already open. I think it must like the humid weather.

    Our Climatis (sp?) however, is a bit of a joke (in the fact we had to laugh). WE bought it from Homebase last year, in the 'sale' but with a 6 month gurantee, we thought what the hell.

    It was quite late in the summer/autumn, so it never really took off too well. Over the winter, it died back, and in fact we thought we'd lost it.

    Then come Spring, it suddenly (after I cut it right back to near the ground) started growing new shoots.

    After some time, it was starting to make its way across the trellis. Then, one of the shoots died from th base...removed that. Then another shoot died at the base...removed that. Eventually, the last shoot has died, so there is no clematis (although another new shoot is showing).

    Stoopid thing....I think I might ask my old man for a cutting of the passion flower again B)

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and lots of it or warm and sunny, no mediocre dross
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl
    Well, I did what I said, and it has climbed over half the trellice (sp?) which was the intention.

    In fact, its gone mad, but thats exactly what we wanted.

    Lots of flower bulbs too now, and in fact, have a few flowers already open. I think it must like the humid weather.

    Our Climatis (sp?) however, is a bit of a joke (in the fact we had to laugh). WE bought it from Homebase last year, in the 'sale' but with a 6 month gurantee, we thought what the hell.

    It was quite late in the summer/autumn, so it never really took off too well. Over the winter, it died back, and in fact we thought we'd lost it.

    Then come Spring, it suddenly (after I cut it right back to near the ground) started growing new shoots.

    After some time, it was starting to make its way across the trellis. Then, one of the shoots died from th base...removed that. Then another shoot died at the base...removed that. Eventually, the last shoot has died, so there is no clematis (although another new shoot is showing).

    Stoopid thing....I think I might ask my old man for a cutting of the passion flower again :)

    Classic Clematis Wilt I'm afraid - fungal disease. All Clematis should be planted deeply, at least 3 inches below soil level for the growing point, this offers some protection from wilt but also gives it a chance to shoot again if the top dies off. Don't dig it up just yet, it may come back and be un-affected.

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