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Posted
  • Location: chellaston, derby
  • Weather Preferences: The Actual Weather ..... not fantasy.
  • Location: chellaston, derby

    anyone else notice that this years privet hedges have all but stopped growing (after 1 trim or more)?

    i cut several hedges for customers regularly from april to october, on a fortnightly basis. ive done this for many years now but this year summuts up with the privet. its stopped growing in patches and the leaves look 'poorly', being off colour.

    anybody else have this problem? what is it? (theres no sign of fungal infection).

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    Posted
  • Location: Bramley, Hampshire, 70m asl
  • Location: Bramley, Hampshire, 70m asl
    anyone else notice that this years privet hedges have all but stopped growing (after 1 trim or more)?

    i cut several hedges for customers regularly from april to october, on a fortnightly basis. ive done this for many years now but this year summuts up with the privet. its stopped growing in patches and the leaves look 'poorly', being off colour.

    anybody else have this problem? what is it? (theres no sign of fungal infection).

    mmm you're right about the slow growth

    -- I've got a long one, about 50m :rolleyes: -- it's a bit of a mare to cut and I was only looking at it yesterday thinking it could wait for a few more weeks as growth seems slow -- leaves looks healthy though.

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    Posted
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL
    mmm you're right about the slow growth

    -- I've got a long one, about 50m :rolleyes:

    *snigger*

    We havent got any Privet, but growth of most things seem quite slow in our back garden, but over the last 3 weeks have really started to grow.

    Interestingly, it seems to be when we have some decent rain...just wondering if it is anything to do with lack of water? It was quite a dry winter wasnt it?

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    Posted
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
  • Weather Preferences: Thunder, snow, heat, sunshine...
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.

    Could it have anything to do with the fact that it's been (relatively) a cold winter? Is it only people that get soft?

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    Posted
  • Location: West Bromwich (West Mids) 170m ASL
  • Location: West Bromwich (West Mids) 170m ASL

    We have 1 around our front garden around 40m of the bloomin stuff. We have only cut it once this year about 10 days ago and it didnt really need cutting-just tidying up. Usually we cut it in early may and its around 6 inches long so it really has been a late grower this year.

    I honestly think its due to the cold winter with its continuous harsh frosts that has kept it from growing. GOOD! Less work for me!

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    Posted
  • Location: chellaston, derby
  • Weather Preferences: The Actual Weather ..... not fantasy.
  • Location: chellaston, derby
    *snigger*

    We havent got any Privet, but growth of most things seem quite slow in our back garden, but over the last 3 weeks have really started to grow.

    Interestingly, it seems to be when we have some decent rain...just wondering if it is anything to do with lack of water? It was quite a dry winter wasnt it?

    i thought about that, but the 'disease' if it is one, seems only to be attacking parts of the bush, not the whole lot... so i dont think weather/water has owt to do with it.

    Could it have anything to do with the fact that it's been (relatively) a cold winter? Is it only people that get soft?

    nah.... ive not seen anything to suggest that, privet in spring 79 was fine, and in 82...

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    Posted
  • Location: chellaston, derby
  • Weather Preferences: The Actual Weather ..... not fantasy.
  • Location: chellaston, derby

    right.... im safe! :D thinking that my cutting the hedges may have left them open for fungal/bacterial attack... this morning i cut 2 more privet hedges, both for the first time this year, and both had 'diseased' patches in them... so it wasnt me! :D

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    Posted
  • Location: Hampshire Snow Hoper
  • Location: Hampshire Snow Hoper

    Remember Mushy that privet like all hedging likes water early in the year to get it going the yew and lleylandii have made major growth here this year possibly due to snow melt cant be sure but one thing without question is true any privet,weakened by the sharp winter just gone renders it open to infection by Honey Fungus which of course can destroy a hedge tree or shrub ect

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    Posted
  • Location: chellaston, derby
  • Weather Preferences: The Actual Weather ..... not fantasy.
  • Location: chellaston, derby
    Remember Mushy that privet like all hedging likes water early in the year to get it going the yew and lleylandii have made major growth here this year possibly due to snow melt cant be sure but one thing without question is true any privet,weakened by the sharp winter just gone renders it open to infection by Honey Fungus which of course can destroy a hedge tree or shrub ect

    yeah i found online that honey fungus can be a problem, although ive never seen it in privet..

    if what im seeing is honey fungus or some such fungal/bacterial infection then my tip is invest in shares in privet hedge growing companies! :rolleyes:

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    Posted
  • Location: Coalpit Heath, South Gloucestershire
  • Location: Coalpit Heath, South Gloucestershire

    Yes, I have a problem with my privet. I am thankful that it's not growing much, as I am recovering from a broken right wrist and I have 4, yes 4 privet hedges, total length about 70/80 feet, so the slower they grow the better.

    Anyway, I digress......here is my privet problem........

    the one that runs across the front of my house has got horribly sticky and dirty looking. The leaves are going a sickly yellowy colour and dying and the branches are getting bare.

    Can anyone advise what this might be? Could it be the aforementioned Honey Fungus?

    Whilst I'm here....I wish to put a curse on the EU for banning Cloverkill, Ivykiller and sodium chlorate. The 3 sodding things that kept my garden weed free and now I can't get them. Can anyone suggest effective alternatives? Ta muchly!

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    Posted
  • Location: frogmore south devon
  • Location: frogmore south devon

    [quote name='noggin

    Whilst I'm here....I wish to put a curse on the EU for banning Cloverkill, Ivykiller and sodium chlorate. The 3 sodding things that kept my garden weed free and now I can't get them. Can anyone suggest effective alternatives? Ta muchly!

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    Posted
  • Location: Coalpit Heath, South Gloucestershire
  • Location: Coalpit Heath, South Gloucestershire
    [quote name='noggin

    Whilst I'm here....I wish to put a curse on the EU for banning Cloverkill, Ivykiller and sodium chlorate. The 3 sodding things that kept my garden weed free and now I can't get them. Can anyone suggest effective alternatives? Ta muchly!

    Try a flame thrower :)

    For the weeds or the EU? :)

    Actually, a flame thrower isn't a bad idea.....thanks, BARRY. I shall investigate!

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    Posted
  • Location: consett co durham
  • Location: consett co durham
    Yes, I have a problem with my privet. I am thankful that it's not growing much, as I am recovering from a broken right wrist and I have 4, yes 4 privet hedges, total length about 70/80 feet, so the slower they grow the better.

    Anyway, I digress......here is my privet problem........

    the one that runs across the front of my house has got horribly sticky and dirty looking. The leaves are going a sickly yellowy colour and dying and the branches are getting bare.

    Can anyone advise what this might be? Could it be the aforementioned Honey Fungus?

    Whilst I'm here....I wish to put a curse on the EU for banning Cloverkill, Ivykiller and sodium chlorate. The 3 sodding things that kept my garden weed free and now I can't get them. Can anyone suggest effective alternatives? Ta muchly!

    sounds like sooty mould,basically its the excretions of aphids.

    blocks the leaf pores,and hinders photosynthesis.get the hose onto it and give it a good blasting :)

    are there any old tree stumps near to it?

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    Posted
  • Location: Hampshire Snow Hoper
  • Location: Hampshire Snow Hoper

    For information purposes only Sodium Chlorate isnt banned i have many 25kg bags of the stuff also round up bio last bit important far stronger than garden centre knats pee sad thing with most killer stuff now is that it is all weakened by law a few years ago one decent treatment of sodium chlorate wiped out weeds and almost anything else in its path for months not so now im afraid

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    Posted
  • Location: chellaston, derby
  • Weather Preferences: The Actual Weather ..... not fantasy.
  • Location: chellaston, derby

    i use sodium chlorate.... but the best weedkiller (total/contact) is anything with glyphosate in...tumbleweed, roundup, etc

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    Posted
  • Location: Coalpit Heath, South Gloucestershire
  • Location: Coalpit Heath, South Gloucestershire

    Thanks, jv and mushy, for the info. A pro gardener friend and myself have both been unable to get sodium chlorate.......maybe it's a supply issue locally. :)

    sounds like sooty mould,basically its the excretions of aphids.

    blocks the leaf pores,and hinders photosynthesis.get the hose onto it and give it a good blasting :)

    are there any old tree stumps near to it?

    Well, I'll be jiggered :) .............there is a dead tree stump directly in front of the affected part of the hedge!

    Is there a connection? Do the little blighters over-winter in it?

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    Posted
  • Location: consett co durham
  • Location: consett co durham
    i use sodium chlorate.... but the best weedkiller (total/contact) is anything with glyphosate in...tumbleweed, roundup, etc

    ive switched to GALLUP this year.very impressed with it :)

    Thanks, jv and mushy, for the info. A pro gardener friend and myself have both been unable to get sodium chlorate.......maybe it's a supply issue locally. :)

    Well, I'll be jiggered :) .............there is a dead tree stump directly in front of the affected part of the hedge!

    Is there a connection? Do the little blighters over-winter in it?

    that stump may be the source of honey fungus,try to remove it asap.

    it's stated that there's no chemicals to treat it.

    but in the past iv'e had success using ARMILLATOX.

    forgot to add the ARMILLATOX is for drenching the hole where the stump was :) .

    dont spray the hedge with it :)

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    Posted
  • Location: Coalpit Heath, South Gloucestershire
  • Location: Coalpit Heath, South Gloucestershire
    forgot to add the ARMILLATOX is for drenching the hole where the stump was ;) .

    dont spray the hedge with it :)

    Cheers again, peterf. The stump does have a lot of fungus on it............sloppy housekeeping in the garden, on my part! :cray:

    I remember using Armillatox many years ago, but I cannot remember what for. I do remember it being pretty potent, so maybe it's one for the interfering, busybodying EU to poke it's nose into.

    It'll be ages before I'm fit enough to dig the stump out, so maybe I could just drench the stump for now..........would that be effective, do you think?

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    Posted
  • Location: Lochgelly - Highest town in Fife at 150m ASL.
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and cold. Enjoy all extremes though.
  • Location: Lochgelly - Highest town in Fife at 150m ASL.

    Blimey Mushy I did a double take there - thought you had a PRIVATE problem! :D No such problems up here but growth is also slow. Lost a lot of mature plants this year though - pinks, chrysanthemums, which I have put down to the very hard frosts over winter. I probably cut them back too far in the Autumn?

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    Posted
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield
  • Weather Preferences: Any Extreme
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield
    anyone else notice that this years privet hedges have all but stopped growing (after 1 trim or more)?

    i cut several hedges for customers regularly from april to october, on a fortnightly basis. ive done this for many years now but this year summuts up with the privet. its stopped growing in patches and the leaves look 'poorly', being off colour.

    anybody else have this problem? what is it? (theres no sign of fungal infection).

    Nope growing fine here but if missing cutting the stuff we've got plenty for you to do. But you can't put in the Green Wheelie bin as it's already full of weeds and err Privet so you'll have to take it with you I'm afraid.

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    Posted
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
  • Weather Preferences: Thunder, snow, heat, sunshine...
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
    i use sodium chlorate.... but the best weedkiller (total/contact) is anything with glyphosate in...tumbleweed, roundup, etc

    You beat me to it, Mushy! :D

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    Posted
  • Location: Hampshire Snow Hoper
  • Location: Hampshire Snow Hoper

    Again information only but Armillatox is now illegal but as a warning should you use it what happens is that it kills the ground around the infected area too so be careful

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    Posted
  • Location: consett co durham
  • Location: consett co durham
    Cheers again, peterf. The stump does have a lot of fungus on it............sloppy housekeeping in the garden, on my part! :unsure:

    I remember using Armillatox many years ago, but I cannot remember what for. I do remember it being pretty potent, so maybe it's one for the interfering, busybodying EU to poke it's nose into.

    It'll be ages before I'm fit enough to dig the stump out, so maybe I could just drench the stump for now..........would that be effective, do you think?

    ARMILLATOX has been reclassfied as a garden cleaner :) .

    keeps the EU off their backs.

    if you cant remove the stumps,try taking out a trench around the stump.then apply the drench into that,you need to grt to the roots.pay particular attention to the are between the stump and the privet hedge.

    3-4 applications per year until you think youv'e got it beat.good luck peter :)

    Again information only but Armillatox is now illegal but as a warning should you use it what happens is that it kills the ground around the infected area too so be careful

    ive just spoken to head office in MORTON, DERBYSHIRE.

    the product has simply been reclassified.the reason being that the EU required over3 million quid, to licence it as a PESTICIDE :p

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Under European legislation the active ingredients of all pesticides have to be reviewed, the cost of raising the data for the review is estimated to be £3 million - to a small company the cost is prohibitive

    As current legislation stands it will be illegal for Armillatox to be sold as a pesticide after 25th July 2003 in European Member States - outside of Europe it will continue as normal.

    We have made representations to the EU and have been supported by our MEP to look at a reduced package for small companies with niche products such Armillatox but as the deadline approaches, we have has to reconsider our position

    Therefore as from 25th July 2003, we will re-label Armillatox as 'Armillatox Soap Based Outdoor Cleaner' so taking it out of the pesticides regulations - the formulation will remain the same.

    this should help NOGGIN

    http://www.armillatox.com/

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    Posted
  • Location: chellaston, derby
  • Weather Preferences: The Actual Weather ..... not fantasy.
  • Location: chellaston, derby
    Blimey Mushy I did a double take there - thought you had a PRIVATE problem! :closedeyes: No such problems up here but growth is also slow. Lost a lot of mature plants this year though - pinks, chrysanthemums, which I have put down to the very hard frosts over winter. I probably cut them back too far in the Autumn?

    i dont think you can cut them back too far.... theyll only rot off on top anyway over winter if left...

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    Posted
  • Location: Coalpit Heath, South Gloucestershire
  • Location: Coalpit Heath, South Gloucestershire

    Oh, deary me. Whilst investigating on the interwebby thing, I happened across this http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/c.../90610w0003.htm

    As I have not thoroughly read the article yet*, I do not know what they are up to, but I did see that they are discussing weedkillers containing ammonium sulphamate. :)

    * a bit heavy going at the moment :)

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