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Driest July On Record


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Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam

The driest July on record for England and Wales was the July of 1825 which recorded a rainfall average of just 8.2mm

From the 8th and 31st July, the weather was described in London as fine, clear and dry. There was a notable heatwave midmonth when on 6 consecutive days, a maximum of 90F+ was recorded in London.

Temperatures

1. 74f, 45f

2. 76f, 45f

3. 83f, 57f

4. 80f, 55f

5. 75f, 48f

6. 68f, 45f

7. 71f, 45f

8. 76f, 51f

9. 79f, 53f

10. 87f, 50f

11. 89f, 58f

12. 89f, 58f

13. 86f, 59f

14. 92f, 58f

15. 95f, 62f

16. 91f, 58f

17. 92f, 58f

18. 97f, 62f

19. 95f, 58f

20. 87f, 56f

21. 79f, 47f

22. 80f, 52f

23. 74f, 44f

24. 72f, 42f

25. 78f, 40f

26. 74f, 45f

27. 82f, 48f

28. 84f, 49f

29. 81f, 43f

30. 80f, 47f

31. 91f, 52f

The CET for 14th-19th was 22.2C

The overall CET was 17.2C

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Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District. 290 mts a.s.l.
  • Weather Preferences: Anything extreme
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District. 290 mts a.s.l.

Interesting to see the absence of the urban heat island in those far off days. The minima are remarkably low for such a hot month, particularly around mid-month when, with maxima in the 90s, the minima were mostly in the mid to high 50s.

As we've seen in recent years minima are more likely be in the mid to high 60s, if not the low 70s, when such spells occur now.

Was it July 18th 1825 which was described as 'Hot Tuesday'? I'm at work and can't look it up but remember reading descriptions of birds falling dead from the sky and labourers dying in the fields. With a max' of 97f at, presumably, Greenwich it seems possible.

Edited by Terminal Moraine
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Posted
  • Location: South Derbyshire nr. Burton on Trent, Midlands, UK: alt 262 feet
  • Weather Preferences: Extreme winter cold,heavy bowing snow,freezing fog.Summer 2012
  • Location: South Derbyshire nr. Burton on Trent, Midlands, UK: alt 262 feet
Interesting to see the absence of the urban heat island in those far off days. The minima are remarkably low for such a hot month, particularly around mid-month when, with maxima in the 90s, the minima were mostly in the mid to high 50s.

As we've seen in recent years minima are more likely be in the mid to high 60s, if not the low 70s, when such spells occur now.

Was it July 18th 1825 which was described as 'Hot Tuesday'? I'm at work and can't look it up but remember reading descriptions of birds falling dead from the sky and labourers dying in the fields. With a max' of 97f at, presumably, Greenwich it seems possible.

Hi TM,

Here is an extract from my book which I bought in 1970 and cost me 55 shillings. ‘Britons Weather Its Workings Lore and Forces.’ By David Bowen.

8th July 1707 ‘It was so hot and airless that a number of men and horses died of heat-Stroke’

‘The day was recalled as Hot Tuesday’

Paul

Edited by Polar Continental
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Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District. 290 mts a.s.l.
  • Weather Preferences: Anything extreme
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District. 290 mts a.s.l.
Hi TM,

Here is an extract from my book which I bought in 1970 and cost me 55 shillings. ‘Britons Weather Its Workings Lore and Forces.’ By David Bowen.

8th July 1707 ‘It was so hot and airless that a number of men and horses died of heat-Stroke’

‘The day was recalled as Hot Tuesday’

Paul

Thanks Paul, it would be interesting to know what the max' temp' was on that day.

In all the hot summers we've had in the last 30 years or so I can't remember stories of men and horses dying of heat stroke although in those days perhaps they just stayed out in the fields regardless of heat, with not enough to drink.

Of coures there aren't many men working horses these days so any direct comparison is impossible but perhaps the French heatwave of a few years ago, when thousands of people died, is comparable. I think though that most of those deaths were of the elderly or of those with other medical conditions, not of, supposedly, fit people who would be used to hard physical work.

I can remember trench digging by hand and using jackhammers in the summers of 1976 and 1983 without even suffering a headache so can't imagine how hot it would have to be to kill you in the fields.

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Posted
  • Location: South Derbyshire nr. Burton on Trent, Midlands, UK: alt 262 feet
  • Weather Preferences: Extreme winter cold,heavy bowing snow,freezing fog.Summer 2012
  • Location: South Derbyshire nr. Burton on Trent, Midlands, UK: alt 262 feet
Thanks Paul, it would be interesting to know what the max' temp' was on that day.

In all the hot summers we've had in the last 30 years or so I can't remember stories of men and horses dying of heat stroke although in those days perhaps they just stayed out in the fields regardless of heat, with not enough to drink.

Of coures there aren't many men working horses these days so any direct comparison is impossible but perhaps the French heatwave of a few years ago, when thousands of people died, is comparable. I think though that most of those deaths were of the elderly or of those with other medical conditions, not of, supposedly, fit people who would be used to hard physical work.

I can remember trench digging by hand and using jackhammers in the summers of 1976 and 1983 without even suffering a headache so can't imagine how hot it would have to be to kill you in the fields.

Hi again TM,

Unfortunately the book doesn’t give the temperature for that particular occasion, but have just Googled it. The estimated temperature was 38c.

‘July 8

1707 aka Hot Tuesday; several men and horses are killed by heatstroke as temperatures reach an estimated 38C. This is probably the UK's hottest day since the Medieval Warm Period (1100-1250 ish). 14 ‘

Link below,

http://www.dandantheweatherman.com/wortrivjul.html

I suppose in those days, possibly many men employed in manual labour and especially the horses were made to work beyond their natural ability’s and they succumbed to heat-stroke in the intense heat.

Paul

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Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District. 290 mts a.s.l.
  • Weather Preferences: Anything extreme
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District. 290 mts a.s.l.

That's a great link, Paul. I've bookmarked it for reading thoroughly later.

Certainly agree with your last sentence, at least when I was working in the heat I could have as many drinks as I liked and if I had felt ill I could have stopped.

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