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Thunder Snow?


frogesque

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Posted
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W

    I'm not sure if this is the right place to post so Mods, feel free to move.

    I was in the general area of the hills around Wanlochead (1500ft asl), Dumfrieshire on Monday afternoon (22nd. Mar. 2010) about 3.30pm and heading back down a small glen to the car parked beside the Mennock River it suddenly came over very dark with a strong wind coming up the gully (roughly from a Southerly direction). The rain quickly turned to sleet, then snow and at the height of the brief storm there were a few very bright flashes of lightning followed imediatlely by loud thunder. By the time I'd got back to the car the sky had cleared and the wind died to little more than a light breeze. No photos I'm afraid as my camera battery had died on me. :lol:

    Is this just normal lightning induced by strong winds, hills and valleys with heavy rain/snow or is it what would be called thunder snow?

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    Posted
  • Location: Lincoln, Lincolnshire
  • Weather Preferences: Sunshine, convective precipitation, snow, thunderstorms, "episodic" months.
  • Location: Lincoln, Lincolnshire

    It would indeed be thundersnow- the term simply describes a thunderstorm accompanying snow instead of rain. It isn't just north, west and east-facing coasts that are relatively prone, so is high ground due to lower temperatures and orographic enhancement.

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    Posted
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W

    Thanks for the interesting comments guys! Thundersnow it was then! :doh:

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    • 9 months later...

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