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Perseids 2011


shuggee

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Posted
  • Location: Upper Tweeddale, Scottish Borders 240m ASL
  • Location: Upper Tweeddale, Scottish Borders 240m ASL

Report on the Nat Geo website about this year's show:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/07/110725-double-meteor-shower-sky-show-space-science-perseid-aquarid/

So a full moon at the Perseid peak, but the tail-end of the lesser-known Delta Aquarids could make for some spectacular night sky action.

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Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District South Pennines Middleton & Smerrill Tops 305m (1001ft) asl.
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District South Pennines Middleton & Smerrill Tops 305m (1001ft) asl.

So this is happening on Friday 29th (this friday) not 12th August, Its not very clearly written. Any how, should be a good show given the current dry and clear conditions.

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Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

So this is happening on Friday 29th (this friday) not 12th August

radiant_perseids_3001.jpg

August 12 and 13, 2011 Perseids

And when we say August 12 or 13, we mean the morning hours after midnight – not that night. Unfortunately, the full moon will spoil 2011′s Perseid display, obscuring all but the brighter meteors, during the shower’s actual peak. But you will see Perseids in the weeks leading up to the peak, too, if you have dark skies. These typically fast and bright meteors radiate from a point in the constellation Perseus the Hero. You don’t need to know Perseus to watch the shower because the meteors appear in all parts of the sky. The Perseids are considered by many people to be the year’s best shower, and often peak at 50 or more meteors per hour – in years when the moon is out of the sky. However, 2011 is not a great year for the Perseids, because the moon is full on the expected peak date. The Perseids tend to strengthen in number as late night deepens into midnight, and typically produce the most meteors in the wee hours before dawn. These meteors are often bright and frequently leave persistent trains. Start watching for the Perseids in the first week of August. They will be building gradually to their peak. By the second week of August, the moon will begin interfering with the skies between midnight and dawn. On the mornings of August 12 and 13, you can still watch for some Perseid meteors to streak across this short summer night from midnight until dawn. Yet the full moon will interfere.

http://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentials/earthskys-meteor-shower-guide

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Posted
  • Location: Taasinge, Denmark
  • Location: Taasinge, Denmark

Not a very active thread is it? Maybe others, like me, find watching meteor showers rather like picking wild mushrooms; the prospect is intriguing, but the end result a disappointment.I think I'll stay in bed.

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Posted
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W

Not a very active thread is it? Maybe others, like me, find watching meteor showers rather like picking wild mushrooms; the prospect is intriguing, but the end result a disappointment.I think I'll stay in bed.

Most meteor showers require a bit of patience. Quite often it's the "What the *** was that!" sporadic fireball that most sticks in the mind. The heavens rarely 'rain' down.

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Posted
  • Location: Taasinge, Denmark
  • Location: Taasinge, Denmark

Most meteor showers require a bit of patience. Quite often it's the "What the *** was that!" sporadic fireball that most sticks in the mind. The heavens rarely 'rain' down.

Speaking of fireballs, I saw a lovely sight in January 2010 just after sunset. A very bright object fell slowly down to the southwest of here just after sunset, taking maybe thirty seconds from its first apperance to finally extinguishing. At first i thought it was a parachute flare, but I very quickly realized it was something far larger and very high up.

By the way, I've found that the best spot to observe the heavens in our part of the world is at sea. On most dark, clear nights there are meteors, and I suppose that is why celebrated meteor showers interest me little.

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Posted
  • Location: Newton-le-Willows, Warrington, Merseyside
  • Location: Newton-le-Willows, Warrington, Merseyside

It's that time of year again! Ther Perseids reach theie maximum over the next week, peaking overnight on the 12th August. Unfortunately, this coincides with more or less a full moon, HOWEVER, this Moon is only 21 degrees in altitude, unlike in the US where it is much higher. Obviously rates will be lower than last year as most will be drowned out by the glaring Moon, (which is a shame as last year I saw 54 meteors in about 90 minutes!) But as long as it is clear, I will be going to watch Friday night :)

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Posted
  • Location: Newton-le-Willows, Warrington, Merseyside
  • Location: Newton-le-Willows, Warrington, Merseyside

Really cloudy accross most of the UK tonight, so Perseid watching seems minimal... :(

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Posted
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire
  • Weather Preferences: Snowy winters, hot, sunny springs and summers.
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire

Erm, can they be seen tonight? It's clear here!

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Posted
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland
  • Location: Nr Appleby in Westmorland

I saw a few last night as I was walking the dog, despite the bright Moon. Not convinced they were Perseids though although they were vaguely in the right area.

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Posted
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire
  • Weather Preferences: Snowy winters, hot, sunny springs and summers.
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire

Darn. Maybe I should of kept looking. The moon was very bright last night though. I wouldn't of been able to see any away from peak times because of the light pollution around here anyway.

OON, you live in the countryside by the sounds of it, where light pollution will be at a minimal, so they probably were Perseids.

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