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Posted
  • Location: South East Essex
  • Location: South East Essex

After having a few storms around today, I was listening to talk sport radio and could hear a crackle when lightening was about.

My question is, how far can an AM Radio detect a lightening strike, i.e. the crackle??

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Posted
  • Location: Dead Centre of the Vale of Clwyd
  • Weather Preferences: Cold Sancerre.
  • Location: Dead Centre of the Vale of Clwyd

I think (from a long time ago) anywhere up to around 75 - 100 miles away. Because IC (intra-cloud) lightning develops a far lower amplitude 'crackle' than CG (Cloud to Ground) does, then you will only hear CG from further away. Lower frequency radio bands (e.g. long wave) will detect weaker signals (or those further away) than higher frequencies (e.g. medium or short wave). So if you were hearing crackles on Talk Sport (medium wave) then the lightning is likely to be nearer than the distances I state above. But - IC flashes discharge at higher frequencies (nearer short wave than long wave) so that doesn't always hold true. Or something like that.

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Posted
  • Location: South East UK
  • Weather Preferences: Thunderstorms/squalls/hoar-frost/mist
  • Location: South East UK

After having a few storms around today, I was listening to talk sport radio and could hear a crackle when lightening was about.

My question is, how far can an AM Radio detect a lightening strike, i.e. the crackle??

After having a few storms around today, I was listening to talk sport radio and could hear a crackle when lightening was about.

My question is, how far can an AM Radio detect a lightening strike, i.e. the crackle??

the a.m. (m.w.) pocket radio i had was able to pick up storms in southern France at night, i checked it out via the blitzortung lightning map, i think weather conditions can make the range greater in some cases, and each radio varies in sensitivity, so 600miles of range at least at night.
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Posted
  • Location: Crewe, Cheshire
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, storms and other extremes
  • Location: Crewe, Cheshire

I'm perplexed at the need for AM radio any more. I certainly don't want to be listening to low quality, low trebled crackly audio.

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Posted
  • Location: Dead Centre of the Vale of Clwyd
  • Weather Preferences: Cold Sancerre.
  • Location: Dead Centre of the Vale of Clwyd

I'm perplexed at the need for AM radio any more. I certainly don't want to be listening to low quality, low trebled crackly audio.

You're not a cricket fan then! Or travel much!
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Posted
  • Location: South East UK
  • Weather Preferences: Thunderstorms/squalls/hoar-frost/mist
  • Location: South East UK

i dread the day a.m. radios are no longer sold, its the cheapest sferics detector around! , its all i used untill recently lol, i always have a pocket radio at hand,or use the 1 in the car when its thundery.

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Posted
  • Location: Crewe, Cheshire
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, storms and other extremes
  • Location: Crewe, Cheshire

You're not a cricket fan then! Or travel much!

I'm not a cricket fan and I meant in the context of UK radio broadcasting

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Posted
  • Location: South East Essex
  • Location: South East Essex

I'm perplexed at the need for AM radio any more. I certainly don't want to be listening to low quality, low trebled crackly audio.

Cheap...and they are very handy for keeping me up to date with the weather whilst fishing.

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Posted
  • Location: Llanwnnen, Lampeter, Ceredigion, 126m asl (exotic holidays in Rugby/ Coventry)
  • Location: Llanwnnen, Lampeter, Ceredigion, 126m asl (exotic holidays in Rugby/ Coventry)

I'm perplexed at the need for AM radio any more. I certainly don't want to be listening to low quality, low trebled crackly audio.

For the excitement of that loud sharp crackle that tells you a thunderstorm is nearby even if you can't see it due to cloudy skies!

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Posted
  • Location: Warrington, Cheshire. 16M ASL
  • Location: Warrington, Cheshire. 16M ASL

I agree with sprite on this. The am transmission may get interference fro the static just as it leaves the antenna, it bounces off the ionosphere and we receive it 'crackles and all' at the distance of the radio skip !

If you have a MW am radio that tunes between 1620 and 1680 listen there for static as some pirate stations in the Netherlands use less than 100 watts and are subject to more noticeable static

Listen to the latest download in this link http://www.am-forum.nl/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=18345 some of you may be surprised how popular AM is becoming again !

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Posted
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W

My little windup/solar am radio is perfect for camping - long live am!

Edit: Best lightning detectors were the old style trannie radios (Bush etc.) . Tuned inbetween stations on Long Wave and they picked up every local discharge.

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Posted
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W

Each to their own lol

lol! You obviously never had to listen back in the 50's/60's to Radio Luxembourg in the evening with the station and reception drifting about all over the place. A time when dear old Aunty Beeb only had the Light Program playing La Lyn and Perry Como. If you wanted Rock and Roll it was Lux or nothing!

It realy made you understand 'spherics though! Also, due to the trannies' ferrite core aeriels they were sort of directional so you could get an idea of where a TS was coming from. Now you just watch 'em on radar - where's the fun in that? lol

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Posted
  • Location: South East UK
  • Weather Preferences: Thunderstorms/squalls/hoar-frost/mist
  • Location: South East UK

The pocket radios are still quite directional when listening for storms, if you point towards the storms the crackle is clearer, if the radio is not facing towards the lightning it sounds diffuse and softer.

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