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Short and Long Waves


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Posted
  • Location: Mostly Watford but 3 months of the year at Capestang 34310, France
  • Weather Preferences: Continental type climate with lots of sunshine with occasional storm
  • Location: Mostly Watford but 3 months of the year at Capestang 34310, France

    I often see 'short and long waves' referred to but not sure what they are.

    Could somebody explain please what they mean in terms simple enough for my aged brain to understand.

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    Posted
  • Location: lincoln
  • Weather Preferences: erratic weather,week of v.heavy snow or cold
  • Location: lincoln

    A disturbance in the mid or upper part of the atmosphere which induces upward motion ahead of it. Shown as a kink on the contours of a weather map.

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    Posted
  • Location: Hayward’s Heath - home, Brighton/East Grinstead - work.
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and storms
  • Location: Hayward’s Heath - home, Brighton/East Grinstead - work.

    Try reading the middle section of this MIke - its really well explained.

    http://www.geologywales.co.uk/storms/upthere.htm

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    Posted
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks

    I did post my idea somewhere, probably in the model thread so I'll go and look

    A quick one Mike as in a hurry packing etc?

    Long waves are the main troughs-ridges you see on the 500mb charts I use, sometimes referred to as Rossby waves.

    short waves are those that develop often around the base of one of these main troughs. Sometimes they will develop sufficiently to become the main trough themselves, often they disrupt the major pattern for a time before disappearing again.

    The link below is the best in my view, explains long and short waves in the correct way rather than the way the term is used by some on this forum

    http://weatherfaqs.org.uk/node/60

    Like it explains they are upper air features

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