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Climate Battle: Aviemore Vs Buxton


boywonder
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Posted
  • Location: Wrexham
  • Location: Wrexham

    Alot of weather Forums have climate battles and people compare climates and choose which one they like.Didnt see one on here I thought we should have Climate battles and see Which places do people prefer and why.

     

    Aviemore

     

    Annual maximum High 11.4 C.

    Annual Minimum Low 3.4 C.

    Sunshine hours 1205 hours.

    Rain 977.1 mm.

    50-70 days of average lying Snow.

    record lows of -18 to -25.

     

    Buxton

    Annual maximum High 11.5 C.

    Annual minimum low 5.1 C.

    Rain 1329 mm

    Sunshine 1334 hours

    20-30 days of lying snow

    record lows of -15-18 C.

     

    So which climate of the two cold places you prefer and why?

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/climate/city-of-london-greater-london#?tab=climateComparisons

     

    Source met office 

    Edited by boywonder
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    Posted
  • Location: Leeds
  • Weather Preferences: snow, heat, thunderstorms
  • Location: Leeds

    Probably Aviemore, for being snowier and colder in the winter. I would prefer Leeds or Birmingham to both though.

    Edited by cheese
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    Posted
  • Location: Manchester Deansgate.
  • Weather Preferences: Heavy disruptive snowfall.
  • Location: Manchester Deansgate.

    Alot of weather Forums have climate battles and people compare climates and choose which one they like.Didnt see one on here I thought we should have Climate battles and see Which places do people prefer and why.

     

    Aviemore

     

    Annual maximum High 11.4 C.

    Annual Minimum Low 3.4 C.

    Sunshine hours 1205 hours.

    Rain 977.1 mm.

    50-70 days of average lying Snow.

    record lows of -18 to -25.

     

    Buxton

    Annual maximum High 11.5 C.

    Annual minimum low 5.1 C.

    Rain 1329 mm

    Sunshine 1334 hours

    20-30 days of lying snow

    record lows of -15-18 C.

     

    So which climate of the two cold places you prefer and why?

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/climate/city-of-london-greater-london#?tab=climateComparisons

     

    Source met office 

     

     

    Surprised that's not higher, that's about the Norm for here, Saddleworth moor is over 50 days of lying snow and even the centre of Buxton isn't a world lower in altitude.

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    Posted
  • Location: Dundee
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, thunderstorms, gales. All extremes except humidity.
  • Location: Dundee

    Surprised that's not higher, that's about the Norm for here, Saddleworth moor is over 50 days of lying snow and even the centre of Buxton isn't a world lower in altitude.

    Met O records for >50% cover at 9AM at Buxton were around 29 days from the sixties to the eighties. Probably went down a bit since then at least until recently. Aviemore's average in same period was 56 days. Recent years there will have increased the average a bit, especially 2010 with over 100 days with lying snow. As snow is my thing I go for Aviemore. Drier Summer too though still a bit on the damp side for my liking.

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    Posted
  • Location: Manchester Deansgate.
  • Weather Preferences: Heavy disruptive snowfall.
  • Location: Manchester Deansgate.

    Met O records for >50% cover at 9AM at Buxton were around 29 days from the sixties to the eighties. Probably went down a bit since then at least until recently. Aviemore's average in same period was 56 days. Recent years there will have increased the average a bit, especially 2010 with over 100 days with lying snow. As snow is my thing I go for Aviemore. Drier Summer too though still a bit on the damp side for my liking.

     

    Incidentally, i wonder what the stats would be for Flash  (3 miles South West of Buxton but the highest village in the whole of Great Britain).

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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts
  • Weather Preferences: Rain/snow, fog, gales and cold in every season
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts

    Buxton for me as ( a) it's not very far  from where I live and (b) I like large amounts of rain just as much as large amounts of snow and Buxton gets plenty of both.

    Incidentally the average annual number of mornings with snow lying at Flash is currently around 40 whereas in the 70s and 80s it was about 55. These figures are based on visual observations of the Axe Edge/ Flash area which is visible from the moor at the back of my house.

    Compare those with my own site which has a 36 year mean of 29 days compared to 37 in the late 70s and the  80s .

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    Posted
  • Location: Droylsden, Manchester, 94 metres/308 feet ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Dry/mild/warm/sunny/high pressure/no snow/no rain
  • Location: Droylsden, Manchester, 94 metres/308 feet ASL

    Surprised that's not higher, that's about the Norm for here, Saddleworth moor is over 50 days of lying snow and even the centre of Buxton isn't a world lower in altitude.

     

    I reckon being further north by some 25 miles gives Saddleworth moor the edge over Buxton. We all know that even 5 or 10 miles can be a world away in the UK in terms of how different the weather can be.

     

    Of course other factors matter too rather than just how far north one goes but it certainly helps and wouldn't hinder things in terms of snow considering you are more likely to encounter progressively colder air the further north you go, hence more likely to encounter snow on the ground as a result. Obviously not a certainty but just more likely to happen.

    Edited by Gaz1985
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    Posted
  • Location: Shrewsbury
  • Location: Shrewsbury

    Aviemore- it's drier by some margin, and snowier- yet the average max is almost the same. How do the sunshine hours in summer compare I wonder, I suspect Aviemore comes out duller mainly because of its shorter winter days.

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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District South Pennines Middleton & Smerrill Tops 305m (1001ft) asl.
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District South Pennines Middleton & Smerrill Tops 305m (1001ft) asl.

    Im with TM on this, living at over a 1000ft above sea level and only 5 mls from Buxton i pretty much get the same conditions. Temps are probably cooler here and better snow depths as more rural than Buxton town and not as sheltered.

    Edited by Polar Maritime
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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts
  • Weather Preferences: Rain/snow, fog, gales and cold in every season
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts

    Im with TM on this, living at over a 1000ft above sea level and only 5 mls from Buxton i pretty much get the same conditions. Temps are probably cooler here and better snow depths as more rural than Buxton town and not as sheltered.

    We also frequently  do better than Buxton for snowfall in easterlies/ north easterlies, P.M, though admittedly not as well in cold north westerlies.  I've lost count of the times I've seen the hills around, and to the north west of Buxton, white with snow in a showery north westerly when I've got either nothing or a very thin cover. On the other hand Buxton and Flash didn't get over 40cm of level snow in Nov/Dec 2010 or in March this year, though admittedly in the latter example the drifting was just as severe there as here. 

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    Posted
  • Location: Manchester Deansgate.
  • Weather Preferences: Heavy disruptive snowfall.
  • Location: Manchester Deansgate.

    I reckon being further north by some 25 miles gives Saddleworth moor the edge over Buxton. We all know that even 5 or 10 miles can be a world away in the UK in terms of how different the weather can be.

     

    Of course other factors matter too rather than just how far north one goes but it certainly helps and wouldn't hinder things in terms of snow considering you are more likely to encounter progressively colder air the further north you go, hence more likely to encounter snow on the ground as a result. Obviously not a certainty but just more likely to happen.

     

    True to an extent but there are places in Cumbria and Scotland that are some of the worst places for being snowless in the whole of the UK.

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    Posted
  • Location: Droylsden, Manchester, 94 metres/308 feet ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Dry/mild/warm/sunny/high pressure/no snow/no rain
  • Location: Droylsden, Manchester, 94 metres/308 feet ASL

    Whats the snowiest low lying place in england?buxton?alston?consett?..buxton still gets lots of snow by english standards.

     

    Well Alston and Buxton are way too high to be regarded as low lying as their about 300-350m ASL. For somewhere just below 200m I would say Redesdale camp in Northumberland would be a likely candidate.

     

    If I chose a place just above 200m I reckon probably Middleton-in-Teesdale.

     

    And for my own question lol the snowiest place in UK I think maybe Tomintoul.

    Edited by Gaz1985
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    Posted
  • Location: Droylsden, Manchester, 94 metres/308 feet ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Dry/mild/warm/sunny/high pressure/no snow/no rain
  • Location: Droylsden, Manchester, 94 metres/308 feet ASL

    True to an extent but there are places in Cumbria and Scotland that are some of the worst places for being snowless in the whole of the UK.

     

    Yes I think a bit of the coast of Cumbria and western parts of Scotland were some of the only places to not have much snow in December 2010. But I think if you are far enough inland and north you can't really go wrong for snowfalls. Cairngorm and even the Pennines are a prime example.

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
  • Weather Preferences: Sunshine and 15-25c
  • Location: Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)

    hardly a fair battle as the clinate for both places is virtually the same nothing to separate them...i wouldnt like to live in either place

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    Posted
  • Location: North York Moors
  • Location: North York Moors

    I doubt any of the Pennine locations beat the North York Moors for snow if that's what you like - although the higher parts of the Pennines may retain snow for more days over the season.We are *always' in the firing line for North Sea showers (essentially lake effect snow) when the wind is between North and SE - from now until about June!http://forum.netweather.tv/gallery/album/735-north-york-moors-weather/

    Edited by 4wd
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    Posted
  • Location: Northern Lake District. 150m asl
  • Location: Northern Lake District. 150m asl

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/pub/data/weather/uk/climate/averages/maps/uk/8110_1km/SnowLying_Average_1981-2010_17.gif

     

    Upper Eden valley appears to be the only large "lowland" area of England in the dark blue

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    Posted
  • Location: halifax 125m
  • Weather Preferences: extremes the unusual and interesting facts
  • Location: halifax 125m

    I reckon being further north by some 25 miles gives Saddleworth moor the edge over Buxton. We all know that even 5 or 10 miles can be a world away in the UK in terms of how different the weather can be.

     

    Of course other factors matter too rather than just how far north one goes but it certainly helps and wouldn't hinder things in terms of snow considering you are more likely to encounter progressively colder air the further north you go, hence more likely to encounter snow on the ground as a result. Obviously not a certainty but just more likely to happen.

    Not exactly sure what you are trying to compare but isn't buxton around 300m whereas saddleworth moor is about 450m....that's not the same altitude to me....altitude is everything with regards to snowcover

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    Posted
  • Location: halifax 125m
  • Weather Preferences: extremes the unusual and interesting facts
  • Location: halifax 125m

    I doubt any of the Pennine locations beat the North York Moors for snow if that's what you like - although the higher parts of the Pennines may retain snow for more days over the season.We are *always' in the firing line for North Sea showers (essentially lake effect snow) when the wind is between North and SE - from now until about June!http://forum.netweather.tv/gallery/album/735-north-york-moors-weather/

    Am not sure about your claim but it is interesting,i think some years that maybe the case but depending where the weather fronts are coming from that may not be true!Maybe someone can verify that!

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    Posted
  • Location: Leeds
  • Weather Preferences: snow, heat, thunderstorms
  • Location: Leeds

    The North York Moors may get larger falls because they are very prone to North Sea showers, but the Pennines can definitely get clobbered during frontal situations - they're very wet, although it depends on how much of that precipitation falls as snow.

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