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Rainiest towns in Uk?


boywonder
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Posted
  • Location: Wrexham
  • Location: Wrexham

    There seems to be alot of dispute which is the wettest place in UK?

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/picturegalleries/5386736/Top-10-Britains-wettest-places.html?image=0

    this website states dalness in glen etive is the wettest. While other sites states its seathwaite in cumbria.

    Also the wettest spot in place is quoted as top of snowdonia with 4500 mm but met office states part of highlands get more than 5000 mm of rain.

    Can anyone clear up both wettest inhabited place and spot for me?

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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District South Pennines Middleton & Smerrill Tops 305m (1001ft) asl.
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District South Pennines Middleton & Smerrill Tops 305m (1001ft) asl.

    The thread is called Rainiest Town in the UK. Then you ask for inhabited, Anyway the wettest inhabited place on average is Crib Goch in SnowdoniaWales, with 4470 millimetres or 176.0ins of rain. I was up there night before last believe it or not..

    Edited by Polar Maritime
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    Posted
  • Location: Manchester
  • Location: Manchester

    In terms of big towns/cities I believe Swansea is the wettest at around 1360mm per year- that's over double London's rainfall I believe and is very impressive when you consider that Manchester only averages a fraction over 800mm and yet has a reputation for being wet.

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    Posted
  • Location: halifax 125m
  • Weather Preferences: extremes the unusual and interesting facts
  • Location: halifax 125m

    In terms of big towns/cities I believe Swansea is the wettest at around 1360mm per year- that's over double London's rainfall I believe and is very impressive when you consider that Manchester only averages a fraction over 800mm and yet has a reputation for being wet.

    I did read somewhere that Oldham and Burnley were the wettest towns,i would guess a smaller town as Queensbury has to be up there am sure someone has some figures.

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    Posted
  • Location: Solihull, WestMidlands, 121m asl -20 :-)
  • Weather Preferences: Cold and Snow -20 would be nice :)
  • Location: Solihull, WestMidlands, 121m asl -20 :-)

    STAFFORD :rofl:

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    Posted
  • Location: Leeds
  • Weather Preferences: snow, heat, thunderstorms
  • Location: Leeds

    In terms of big towns/cities I believe Swansea is the wettest at around 1360mm per year- that's over double London's rainfall I believe and is very impressive when you consider that Manchester only averages a fraction over 800mm and yet has a reputation for being wet.

    Where are these stats from? I've seen it quoted before but never seen a direct source. Mumbles has 999mm. Glasgow Airport has 1245mm.

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    Posted
  • Location: Wrexham
  • Location: Wrexham

    In terms of big towns/cities I believe Swansea is the wettest at around 1360mm per year- that's over double London's rainfall I believe and is very impressive when you consider that Manchester only averages a fraction over 800mm and yet has a reputation for being wet.

    How big is fort william? 1883 mm of rain

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    Posted
  • Location: North York Moors
  • Location: North York Moors

    I doubt Swansea is the wettest 'large town' but the question needs defining better to get serious answers.
    Seathwaite in Borrowdale is generally considered the wettest inhabited place in the UK but there are only about two houses there.
     


    You could also consider 'rainiest' to mean  number of days with rain falling rather than total amount of precipitation, which is probably not the same place.

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    Posted
  • Location: Gloucestershire [prev. Bucks and Devon]
  • Weather Preferences: Snow deprived so anything white.
  • Location: Gloucestershire [prev. Bucks and Devon]

    Where's Plymouth? After living there for five years I can safely say it rains more than anywhere else I've lived. Miss it.

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    Swansea is the wettest city. Parts of the S. Wales Valleys average in excess of 1800mm, above 2,200mm in the wettest spots such as around the Rhondda. Perhaps the wettest fairly densely populated area in the UK? Many of the other wettest spots are in fairly sparsely populated areas.

     

    Rainfall_Average_1971-2000_17.gif


    Average here is about 1,865mm.

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    Posted
  • Location: NE of Kendal 215m asl
  • Location: NE of Kendal 215m asl

    The thread is called Rainiest Town in the UK. Then you ask for inhabited, Anyway the wettest inhabited place on average is Crib Goch in SnowdoniaWales, with 4470 millimetres or 176.0ins of rain. I was up there night before last believe it or not..

     

    I think you mean uninhabited?! Crib Goch would be a tough place to live, only just enough room to lie down!

     

    I always thought the west highlands were wetter than Cumbria or Snowdonia?

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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District South Pennines Middleton & Smerrill Tops 305m (1001ft) asl.
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District South Pennines Middleton & Smerrill Tops 305m (1001ft) asl.

    I think you mean uninhabited?! Crib Goch would be a tough place to live, only just enough room to lie down!

     

    I always thought the west highlands were wetter than Cumbria or Snowdonia?

     

    Sorry my error, Yes would be a little dodgy living up there !  :laugh:

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    Posted
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: wintry
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/media/pdf/b/d/MetLIB_13_001_Factsheet_4.pdf

    Met office says 5000 mm for west highlands but does not a mention a specific place.

     

    Just hope for there sake all 5000mm doesn't arrive all at once...that's a lot, and "I knows me rain"!

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    Posted
  • Location: Lincoln, Lincolnshire
  • Weather Preferences: Sunshine, convective precipitation, snow, thunderstorms, "episodic" months.
  • Location: Lincoln, Lincolnshire

    I remember reading a paper in Weather which claimed that Swansea is Britain's wettest city, but that Glasgow has been quite close behind since around 1988, when we have had many westerly-dominated winters and springs giving wet conditions to south-west Scotland.  Although Swansea remains highest in terms of quantity of rainfall, Glasgow may well be number one with regards the frequency of rainfall, since in general further north within the UK a given rainfall amount tends to come more frequently but in smaller quantities (this is also reflected by Swansea's relatively high annual sunshine hours).  Lancaster is probably the wettest city in England.

     

    However there are certainly many wetter towns than Swansea.  I always thought Fort William would be there or thereabouts with just short of 2000mm per year.

    Edited by Thundery wintry showers
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    Posted
  • Location: Windermere 120m asl
  • Location: Windermere 120m asl

    I read somewhere the wettest town in England is Ambleside, followed closely by Windermere. I suspect we are on a par with towns in Snowdonia.

     

    For the UK as a whole I would suspect Fort William is the wettest place/town of any real size..

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    In terms of big towns/cities I believe Swansea is the wettest at around 1360mm per year- that's over double London's rainfall I believe and is very impressive when you consider that Manchester only averages a fraction over 800mm and yet has a reputation for being wet.

     

    The local weather station for Swansea (Mumbles) receives 1000mm rainfall per year. http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/climate/gcjjm7j5g

     

    This is drier than the Glasgow average for the same period is also drier than pretty much all of Wales, and often drier than the UK as a whole.

     

    Inland parts of Wales receive vastly more than this, with parts of the valleys often being over double the rainfall here.

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    I remember reading a paper in Weather which claimed that Swansea is Britain's wettest city, but that Glasgow has been quite close behind since around 1988, when we have had many westerly-dominated winters and springs giving wet conditions to south-west Scotland.  Although Swansea remains highest in terms of quantity of rainfall, Glasgow may well be number one with regards the frequency of rainfall, since in general further north within the UK a given rainfall amount tends to come more frequently but in smaller quantities (this is also reflected by Swansea's relatively high annual sunshine hours).  Lancaster is probably the wettest city in England.

     

    However there are certainly many wetter towns than Swansea.  I always thought Fort William would be there or thereabouts with just short of 2000mm per year.

     

    Mumbles has 1000mm of rainfall each year, compared to 1400mm of rainfall across Wales, and UK on average for the same time period 1154mm.(past 30 years)

     

    So the wettest cities of the UK are drier than the UK as a whole.

     

    Indeed we had about 740hrs of sunshine this summer, at least as high as pretty much anywhere in the UK.

     

    One thing is very tricky, when you have places with hills and a very large geographical location, where would the rating be taken, on the top of hill, or in the city centre or on the outskirts as each would give vastly different figures.

     

    For instance where I live at the top of the hill, it is always or average than Mumbles, but also very much snowier, generally warmer by day and often cloudier as well.

     

     

    Swansea is the wettest city. Parts of the S. Wales Valleys average in excess of 1800mm, above 2,200mm in the wettest spots such as around the Rhondda. Perhaps the wettest fairly densely populated area in the UK? Many of the other wettest spots are in fairly sparsely populated areas.

     

    Rainfall_Average_1971-2000_17.gif

    Average here is about 1,865mm.

     

    Is it though, given the figures I have supplied.

    Edited by J10
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    Posted
  • Location: Manchester
  • Location: Manchester

    The local weather station for Swansea (Mumbles) receives 1000mm rainfall per year. http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/climate/gcjjm7j5g

     

    This is drier than the Glasgow average for the same period is also drier than pretty much all of Wales, and often drier than the UK as a whole.

     

    Inland parts of Wales receive vastly more than this, with parts of the valleys often being over double the rainfall here.

     

    I was quoting an article I read and got the statistics from there- might not have been totally accurate though and could have been figures just from the previous year. It sounds like that figure on the Met Office site is lower than Cardiff as well.

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    Where's Plymouth? After living there for five years I can safely say it rains more than anywhere else I've lived. Miss it.

     

    According to this Mount Batten in Plymouth has 1007.4mm of rain over the past 30 years.

     

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/climate/gbvn6nxjm

     

    Cardiff Bute Park has 1151.9mm (which is a fair better wetter than nearby St Athan at around 1000mm)

     

    has http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/climate/gcjszmp44

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    I was quoting an article I read and got the statistics from there- might not have been totally accurate though and could have been figures just from the previous year. It sounds like that figure on the Met Office site is lower than Cardiff as well.

     

    I don't think 1360mm was accurate as an average, certainly not at sea level, however some hills might be close to that, especially inland .

     

    Of course some recent years have been wet and as a one off 1360mm is more than possible.

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    Posted
  • Location: Gloucestershire [prev. Bucks and Devon]
  • Weather Preferences: Snow deprived so anything white.
  • Location: Gloucestershire [prev. Bucks and Devon]

    According to this Mount Batten in Plymouth has 1007.4mm of rain over the past 30 years.

     

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/climate/gbvn6nxjm

    Cheers, not the wettest but pretty wet all the same

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