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Daily Mirror front page: 28th June 1958


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Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam

    I mentioned a "June 1958" tinge to some of those ECM charts. Here's the front page for the Daily Mirror from the 28th June 1958

    1958a.jpg

    1958b.jpg

    1958f.jpg

    1958g.jpg

    Looking at the stats, the rainfall for June 1958 for England and Wales was 110.9mm. making it the wettest June since 1912, not since 1903 as stated.

    The 26th of June was a very wet day in the SE with about an inch of rain falling over the region.

    Gordon Manley is quoted in that article as saying he expected a drier spell at the end of August going off previous years. The "drier" warmer spell came at the start of September.

    Summer 1958 was a bit of a washout overall.

    Chart for 27th of June 1958

    http://www.wetterzentrale.de/archive/ra/19...00119580627.gif

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    Posted
  • Location: Shrewsbury
  • Location: Shrewsbury

    Looking closely the small print suggests the "fifty-five years" is specifically for Kew- one is tempted to say typical SE-centered media even back then :)

    As far as the whole of England and Wales goes, yes it was still the wettest for 46 years- interesting though that at 27 I've lived through 4 wetter Junes than 1958, and 7 over 100mm- someone born in 1900 would need to have lived to 82 to have experienced that.

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    Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam

    For such a wet summer, it was not especially cool. CET: 15.3

    When you consider the two other very wet summers of the 1950s, 1954 and 1956, they both had a CET of 14.1

    It was actually 0.1C warmer than the summer of 1998.

    It follows the summers ending in "8" pattern

    When was the last warm dry summer with a year ending in 8?

    1868 CET: 16.9 Rain: 143mm

    1878 CET: 16.0 Rain: 271mm

    1888 CET: 13.7 Rain: 317mm

    1898 CET: 15.1 Rain: 166mm

    1908 CET: 14.9 Rain: 216mm

    1918 CET: 14.9 Rain: 204mm

    1928 CET: 14.8 Rain: 253mm

    1938 CET: 15.3 Rain: 226mm

    1948 CET: 14.8 Rain: 259mm

    1958 CET: 15.3 Rain: 310mm

    1968 CET: 15.1 Rain: 274mm

    1978 CET: 14.5 Rain: 210mm

    1988 CET: 14.8 Rain: 268mm

    1998 CET: 15.2 Rain: 230mm

    2008 ?

    Is Summer 2008 going to break this odd run?

    Edited by Mr_Data
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    Posted
  • Location: South Pole
  • Location: South Pole
    1968 CET: 15.1 Rain: 274mm

    I remember 1968 being particularly bad. It was an Ashes summer and the Lord's Test was disrupted by some of the largest hailstorms ever seen at a cricket ground. I remember being at home in my bedroom, John Arlott describing the scene in that wonderful Hampshire burr of his. And then of course the Oval Test, when a freak thunderstorm sent the outfield into a virtual lake, spectators famously mopped up and Derek Underwood cleaned up the Aussies with 5 mins to spare on a drying, unplayable wicket, the ball spitting and popping all over the place. Underwood was unplayable on that type of wicket. Wonderful memories.

    Edited by Nick H
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    Posted
  • Location: Lincoln, Lincolnshire
  • Weather Preferences: Sunshine, convective precipitation, snow, thunderstorms, "episodic" months.
  • Location: Lincoln, Lincolnshire

    1958 had 103 hours' sunshine at Durham- oddly, the same as in June 1997, though there have been a few duller ones (June 1987 didn't even make 100 hours)

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