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Space Station Tracking


skidders

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Posted
  • Location: Bristol (Frampton Cotterell)
  • Location: Bristol (Frampton Cotterell)

    I saw something go over Bristol this evening that looked like it was probably a satellite crossing. How can I find out if the Space station went over earlier today or any other satellite. I know the link to view satellite tracking as it happens or future tracks but not how to find previous track.

    Can anyone help?

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    Posted
  • Location: Crowborough, East Sussex 180mASL
  • Location: Crowborough, East Sussex 180mASL

    The ISS was visible from Bristol between 20:15 and 20:19 hrs on Friday 3 October, at a magnitude of -1.4

    It passed on a track commencing due west on the horizon and ending SSE at an elevation of about 30 degrees above the horizon. Maximum elevation was 40 degrees SSW.

    Log on to www.heavens-above.com and enter your location, then use the daily predictions page for satellites above limiting magnitude 3.5. The 'prev' and 'next' options allow you to search retrospectively or future events.

    The following satellites were also visible at a maximum magnitude of 3.5:

    Cosmos 2219 passed directly overhead at 19:50 hrs.

    Cosms 2233 passed directly overhead at 20:15 hrs.

    Cosmos 1939 passed overhead at 20:27 hrs.

    Hope this helps.

    ffO.

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    Posted
  • Location: Bristol (Frampton Cotterell)
  • Location: Bristol (Frampton Cotterell)
    The ISS was visible from Bristol between 20:15 and 20:19 hrs on Friday 3 October, at a magnitude of -1.4

    It passed on a track commencing due west on the horizon and ending SSE at an elevation of about 30 degrees above the horizon. Maximum elevation was 40 degrees SSW.

    Log on to www.heavens-above.com and enter your location, then use the daily predictions page for satellites above limiting magnitude 3.5. The 'prev' and 'next' options allow you to search retrospectively or future events.

    The following satellites were also visible at a maximum magnitude of 3.5:

    Cosmos 2219 passed directly overhead at 19:50 hrs.

    Cosms 2233 passed directly overhead at 20:15 hrs.

    Cosmos 1939 passed overhead at 20:27 hrs.

    Hope this helps.

    ffO.

    Thanks FFO. That was a very helpful answer. I'm guessing that it would have been one of the other satellites as it was very bright. I'll have a play with that site again now.

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    Posted
  • Location: Crowborough, East Sussex 180mASL
  • Location: Crowborough, East Sussex 180mASL
    Thanks FFO. That was a very helpful answer. I'm guessing that it would have been one of the other satellites as it was very bright. I'll have a play with that site again now.

    Hi Skidders. You're welcome.

    It's more than likely that what you saw was the ISS; Apparent Magnitide is measured negatively. i.e. the brighter the object the more -ve the value. So -1.4 is brighter than +3.2.

    The scale is logarithmic with each 1.0 magnitude difference actually 2.5x on a linear scale. e.g. a relative difference of 3.0 magnitude between any two objects is 2.5x2.5x2.5 = 15.625 difference on a linear scale.

    Human visual perception has a limit of approx' +6.0 for the naked eye.

    So the ISS at -1.4 magnitude would appear approx' 89x brighter than the Cosmos satellites at +3.5 magnitude.

    For reference, the star Vega is used for 0 magnitude, Venus is -4.7 at maximum brightness, the full moon is -12.7 and the sun is -26.73 magnitude.

    Good hunting.

    ffO.

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    Posted
  • Location: Bristol (Frampton Cotterell)
  • Location: Bristol (Frampton Cotterell)
    Hi Skidders. You're welcome.

    It's more than likely that what you saw was the ISS; Apparent Magnitide is measured negatively. i.e. the brighter the object the more -ve the value. So -1.4 is brighter than +3.2.

    The scale is logarithmic with each 1.0 magnitude difference actually 2.5x on a linear scale. e.g. a relative difference of 3.0 magnitude between any two objects is 2.5x2.5x2.5 = 15.625 difference on a linear scale.

    Human visual perception has a limit of approx' +6.0 for the naked eye.

    So the ISS at -1.4 magnitude would appear approx' 89x brighter than the Cosmos satellites at +3.5 magnitude.

    For reference, the star Vega is used for 0 magnitude, Venus is -4.7 at maximum brightness, the full moon is -12.7 and the sun is -26.73 magnitude.

    Good hunting.

    ffO.

    Thanks for that, I misunderstood the magnitude scales then. Great explanation!!

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