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Bird Migration


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Posted
  • Location: St helens, warrington, widnes border
  • Weather Preferences: Hot summers, Clod snowy Winters
  • Location: St helens, warrington, widnes border

Hi, does anyone know anything about bird migration?

There has been loads of seagulls migrating in a southerley direction all morning in nw england. Just wondering if it is a sign. They dont usually behave like this in january.

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Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

I'm not sure that the common seagulls from the UK actually migrate do they?

I think most of them spend their lives in the car park outside McDonald's.....

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Posted
  • Location: St helens, warrington, widnes border
  • Weather Preferences: Hot summers, Clod snowy Winters
  • Location: St helens, warrington, widnes border

I dunno coast but there are hundreds migrating here

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Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

Flocking seagulls ?

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Posted
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire
  • Weather Preferences: Snowy winters, hot, sunny springs and summers.
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire

Hi, does anyone know anything about bird migration?

There has been loads of seagulls migrating in a southerley direction all morning in nw england. Just wondering if it is a sign. They dont usually behave like this in january.

Lol?

The tide was probably on the turn at the Mersey. Of course they behave like this in January, and any other year. They will be going to the Mersey to feed.

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Posted
  • Location: Newbury, Berkshire. 107m ASL.
  • Weather Preferences: Summer:sunny, some Thunder,Winter:cold & snowy spells,Other:transitional
  • Location: Newbury, Berkshire. 107m ASL.

More appropriately keep your eyes for TEITS chasing them and other winter escape movements from all manner of birds. Lapwings are a good choice as they are restricted from feeding by the frozen fields. Various ducks in larger numbers is a good potential sign and then there is Waxwings and various other finches and buntings. Another good sign of incoming severe cold is when our very own Paul goes and buys another server. :rofl:

Regards

gottolovethisweather

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Posted
  • Location: St helens, warrington, widnes border
  • Weather Preferences: Hot summers, Clod snowy Winters
  • Location: St helens, warrington, widnes border

3 servers was it not GTLTW :lol:

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Posted
  • Location: Eccles, Greater manchester.
  • Location: Eccles, Greater manchester.

I'm not sure that the common seagulls from the UK actually migrate do they?

I think most of them spend their lives in the car park outside McDonald's.....

lol
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Posted
  • Location: Shirley, Croydon, Greater London
  • Location: Shirley, Croydon, Greater London

Snowy Owls Soar South From Arctic In Rare Mass Migration

Bird enthusiasts are reporting rising numbers of snowy owlsfrom the Arctic winging into the lower 48 states this winter in a mass southern migration that a leading owl researcher called "unbelievable."

Thousands of the snow-white birds, which stand 2 feet tall with 5-foot wingspans, have been spotted from coast to coast, feeding in farmlands in Idaho, roosting on rooftops in Montana, gliding over golf courses in Missouri and soaring over shorelines in Massachusetts.

A certain number of the iconic owls fly south from their Arctic breeding grounds each winter but rarely do so many venture so far away even amid large-scale, periodic southern migrations known as irruptions.

"What we're seeing now -- it's unbelievable," said Denver Holt, head of the Owl Research Institute in Montana.

"This is the most significant wildlife event in decades," added Holt, who has studied snowy owls in their Arctic tundra ecosystem for two decades.

post-2721-0-46909000-1327871283.jpg

http://news.yahoo.co...-175336821.html

Edited by yamkin
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