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Posted
  • Location: Ireland, probably South Tipperary
  • Weather Preferences: Cold, Snow, Windstorms and Thunderstorms
  • Location: Ireland, probably South Tipperary

Thought this would be an interesting topic to discuss. Shall kick it off with this: http://rt.com/news/p...earth-nasa-767/

To avert a possible catastrophe – this time set for February 2013 – scientists suggest confronting asteroid 2012 DA14 with either paint or big guns. The stickler is that time has long run out to build a spaceship to carry out the operation.

NASA's data shows the 60-meter asteroid, spotted by Spanish stargazers in February, will whistle by Earth in 11 months. Its trajectory will bring it within a hair’s breadth of our planet, raising fears of a possible collision.

The asteroid, known as DA14, will pass by our planet in February 2013 at a distance of under 27,000 km (16,700 miles). This is closer than the geosynchronous orbit of some satellites.

There is a possibility the asteroid will collide with Earth, but further calculation is required to estimate the potential threat and work out how to avert possible disaster, NASA expert Dr. David Dunham told students at Russia’s University of Electronics and Mathematics.

“The Earth’s gravitational field will alter the asteroid’s path significantly. Further scrupulous calculation is required to estimate the threat of collision,†said Dr. Dunham, as transcribed by Russia’s Izvestia. “The asteroid may break into dozens of small pieces, or several large lumps may split from it and burn up in the atmosphere. The type of the asteroid and its mineral structure can be determined by spectral analysis. This will help predict its behavior in the atmosphere and what should be done to prevent the potential threat,†said Dr. Dunham.

In the event of a collision, scientists have calculated that the energy released would equate to the destructive power of a thermo-nuclear bomb

In the link, they suggest coating it in paint which would change its reflectivity and thus it's temperature and spin.

Any good ideas on averting disaster lurking around here?

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Posted
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire
  • Weather Preferences: Snowy winters, hot, sunny springs and summers.
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire

It's just a 60m asteroid. It's very small and not concerning. It will be easily smashed to pieces from our weapons, if not, it'll break up in our atmosphere.

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Posted
  • Location: Crewe, Cheshire
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, storms and other extremes
  • Location: Crewe, Cheshire

It's just a 60m asteroid. It's very small and not concerning. It will be easily smashed to pieces from our weapons, if not, it'll break up in our atmosphere.

One of these days we'll get blasted by one, don't think we'll be around to see it though!

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Posted
  • Location: Ireland, probably South Tipperary
  • Weather Preferences: Cold, Snow, Windstorms and Thunderstorms
  • Location: Ireland, probably South Tipperary

It's just a 60m asteroid. It's very small and not concerning. It will be easily smashed to pieces from our weapons, if not, it'll break up in our atmosphere.

The Tunguska Event asteroid was only around half the size http://cdn.nwstatic.co.uk/forum/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/wink.png

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Posted
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire
  • Weather Preferences: Snowy winters, hot, sunny springs and summers.
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire

The Tunguska Event asteroid was only around half the size http://cdn.nwstatic.co.uk/forum/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/wink.png

The actual size of the asteroid is 45m (the 2013 one) that's a 20 second walk. Still, I'm not concerned. :p

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Posted
  • Location: Whitkirk, Leeds 86m asl
  • Weather Preferences: Anything but mild south-westeries in winter
  • Location: Whitkirk, Leeds 86m asl

The Tunguska Event asteroid was only around half the size http://cdn.nwstatic.co.uk/forum/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/wink.png

Yup, and it landed in the middle of Russia and nobody was harmed, so if they could somehow direct it into the Siberian wilderness, I wouldn't care. If it lands in the sea I'd be scared.
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Posted
  • Location: Sunderland
  • Weather Preferences: Hot Summer, Snowy winter and thunderstorms all year round!
  • Location: Sunderland

It's just a 60m asteroid. It's very small and not concerning. It will be easily smashed to pieces from our weapons, if not, it'll break up in our atmosphere.

Just for reference, your post is very misinformed....a 60m asteroid with the potential for impact is very concerning...Should it hypothetically impact in a populated area, say Liverpool for example, then you should be very concerned, not that you'd live long enough for that concern to bother you...hmm..lets, see, everything in a 20 mile radius vapourized instantly, so that's you 'gone for a burton' in a flash, and it would be pretty unpleasant living anywhere in the UK on that day....If it impacts in the Irish Sea, then if I were you, I'd seriously check your home contents insurance for flood damage, or get your surf board out of the garage in preparation for the surf of a lifetime as the tsunami crashes into the shoreline near you.....On that note, it's purely hypothetical, and....sleep well! http://cdn.nwstatic.co.uk/forum/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/wink.png
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Posted
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire
  • Weather Preferences: Snowy winters, hot, sunny springs and summers.
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire

Just for reference, your post is very misinformed....a 60m asteroid with the potential for impact is very concerning...Should it hypothetically impact in a populated area, say Liverpool for example, then you should be very concerned, not that you'd live long enough for that concern to bother you...hmm..lets, see, everything in a 20 mile radius vapourized instantly, so that's you 'gone for a burton' in a flash, and it would be pretty unpleasant living anywhere in the UK on that day....If it impacts in the Irish Sea, then if I were you, I'd seriously check your home contents insurance for flood damage, or get your surf board out of the garage in preparation for the surf of a lifetime as the tsunami crashes into the shoreline near you.....On that note, it's purely hypothetical, and....sleep well! http://cdn.nwstatic.co.uk/forum/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/wink.png

True, but the odds of it striking Liverpool are 1 in about 1,000,000,000 so I'm still not concerned.

It's 45m wide, it'll burn up in the atmosphere, that's if we don't blow it up first.

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Posted
  • Location: Ireland, probably South Tipperary
  • Weather Preferences: Cold, Snow, Windstorms and Thunderstorms
  • Location: Ireland, probably South Tipperary

True, but the odds of it striking Liverpool are 1 in about 1,000,000,000 so I'm still not concerned.

It's 45m wide, it'll burn up in the atmosphere, that's if we don't blow it up first.

Did you read the Tunguska link Goku? That particular object exploded between 6 and 10km from the surface, and still levelled a forested area some 2,000km2. it was also much smaller than the asteroid being discussed now... however unlikely it is to get that close.

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Posted
  • Location: Whaley Bridge - Peak District
  • Location: Whaley Bridge - Peak District

I'd say the odds on a 60m asteroid crashing anywhere on Earth is realistic given the past tense. You only have to see the cratered moon to realise just how close thousands of similar objects have gotten to Earth's orbit (even passing through it) before impacting the Moon, across all sides.

Then take into consideration only the thousands of objects we know about through either RADAR mapping of the skies, or pure chance discovery. Only 2 years ago a 5m asteroid landed in Eastern Africa and even now there could be numerous objects of all shapes and sizes with our name on it. Humans have been lucky in that only 2 impacts have left significant craters (Meteor Crater in Arizona and Tunguska.)

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Posted
  • Location: Sunderland
  • Weather Preferences: Hot Summer, Snowy winter and thunderstorms all year round!
  • Location: Sunderland

An air burst from a 60m wide asteroid would produce the equivalent of a 4.6 megaton nuclear explosion....I wouldn't want to be within 100+ miles of that!

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Posted
  • Location: Whaley Bridge - Peak District
  • Location: Whaley Bridge - Peak District

Meteor Crater info from Wikipedia

The crater was created about 50,000 years ago during the Pleistocene epoch when the local climate on the Colorado Plateau was much cooler and damper. At the time, the area was an open grassland dotted with woodlands inhabited by woolly mammoths and giant ground sloths. It was probably not inhabited by humans; the earliest confirmed record of human habitation in the Americas dates from long after this impact.

The object that excavated the crater was a nickel-iron meteorite about 50 meters (54 yards) across, which impacted the plain at a speed of several kilometers per second. Impact energy has been estimated at about 10 megatons. The speed of the impact has been a subject of some debate. Modeling initially suggested that the meteorite struck at a speed of up to 20 kilometers per second (45,000 mph), but more recent research suggests the impact was substantially slower, at 12.8 kilometers per second (28,600 mph). It is believed that about half of the impactor's 300,000 metric tons (330,000 short tons) bulk was vaporized during its descent, before it hit the ground.

The impactor itself was mostly vaporized; very little of the meteorite remained within the pit that it had excavated.

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Posted
  • Location: Crewe, Cheshire
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, storms and other extremes
  • Location: Crewe, Cheshire

An air burst from a 60m wide asteroid would produce the equivalent of a 4.6 megaton nuclear explosion....I wouldn't want to be within 100+ miles of that!

LOL too true, I don't think Jordan fully understands. Which is denser, Jordan or the 60m wide asteroid? There's only one way to find out........ LOL

Only messing Jordan :p

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Posted
  • Location: Sunderland
  • Weather Preferences: Hot Summer, Snowy winter and thunderstorms all year round!
  • Location: Sunderland

LOL too true, I don't think Jordan fully understands. Which is denser, Jordan or the 60m wide asteroid? There's only one way to find out........ LOL

Only messing Jordan :p

Mind you, Crewe isn't all that far away and would be flattened as well, mind you, there are plenty, probably including the almighty himself who think that leveling Crewe and starting again might be not such a bad thing http://cdn.nwstatic.co.uk/forum/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/laugh.png
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Posted
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire
  • Weather Preferences: Snowy winters, hot, sunny springs and summers.
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire

Mind you, Crewe isn't all that far away and would be flattened as well, mind you, there are plenty, probably including the almighty himself who think that leveling Crewe and starting again might be not such a bad thing http://cdn.nwstatic.co.uk/forum/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/laugh.png

OHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!! HAHA!!

*High fives*

LOL too true, I don't think Jordan fully understands. Which is denser, Jordan or the 60m wide asteroid? There's only one way to find out........ LOL

Only messing Jordan :p

I'm not fat, cheeky bugger. :p

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Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam

It's 45m wide, it'll burn up in the atmosphere,

I doubt it, there would be some debris from it. The meteor that passed over Saturday night was said to be the size of a human fist and the experts still thought there could be meteorites from it.

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Posted
  • Location: Crewe, Cheshire
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, storms and other extremes
  • Location: Crewe, Cheshire

I'm not fat, cheeky bugger. :p

Who said owt about weight? I've seen your pics on FB.........put it this way, I don't think Vin Diesel has anything to worry about :p

Mind you, Crewe isn't all that far away and would be flattened as well, mind you, there are plenty, probably including the almighty himself who think that leveling Crewe and starting again might be not such a bad thing http://cdn.nwstatic.co.uk/forum/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/laugh.png

Oh it wouldn't be a bad thing......I'm aiming to be out of here in the not too distant future :p Edited by CreweCold
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Posted
  • Location: Crewe, Cheshire
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, storms and other extremes
  • Location: Crewe, Cheshire

I doubt it, there would be some debris from it. The meteor that passed over Saturday night was said to be the size of a human fist and the experts still thought there could be meteorites from it.

Well it wouldn't be the first time a fist sized object has caused so much euphoria..........ahem (one for AJ there) :p

Read an article that suggests meteorites at this time of year are slower entering and at shallower angle for some reason?

Edited by CreweCold
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Posted
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire
  • Weather Preferences: Snowy winters, hot, sunny springs and summers.
  • Location: Runcorn, Cheshire

Who said owt about weight? I've seen your pics on FB.........put it this way, I don't think Vin Diesel has anything to worry about :p

Oh it wouldn't be a bad thing......I'm aiming to be out of here in the not too distant future :p

Well VIn Diesel is a buffed up macho man & a hero. I'm just your average lad. Lol.

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Posted
  • Location: Whaley Bridge - Peak District
  • Location: Whaley Bridge - Peak District

I doubt it, there would be some debris from it. The meteor that passed over Saturday night was said to be the size of a human fist and the experts still thought there could be meteorites from it.

According to the Daily Fail, a woman has already discovered it. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2110348/Is-meteorite-terrified-Britain-Florist-claims-space-rock-school-field-walking-dog.html

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  • 2 weeks later...
Posted
  • Location: Lower Brynamman, nr Ammanford, 160-170m a.s.l.
  • Location: Lower Brynamman, nr Ammanford, 160-170m a.s.l.

At 0.6 LD - i.e. 6.10ths of the way to the Moon at closest approach - I don't think there's too much need to worry this time round.

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Posted
  • Location: Shirley, Croydon, Greater London
  • Location: Shirley, Croydon, Greater London

At 0.6 LD - i.e. 6.10ths of the way to the Moon at closest approach - I don't think there's too much need to worry this time round.

There is some doubt regarding the track of this, so keeping an eye on this for possible future changes.

For information: 0.6 is still a distance from earth, however in space terms it is very very close.

Edited by yamkin
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