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Before The Storm


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Posted
  • Location: Springfield, Chelmsford, Essex 30Mtr ASL
  • Weather Preferences: snowy or sunny but not too hot!
  • Location: Springfield, Chelmsford, Essex 30Mtr ASL

Good afternoon everyone, I trust you are all well.

With everyday life on hold I have taken the opportunity to catch up with reading a lot of my old magazines that I didn't have time to previously.

Among my many interests is stamp collecting- after all philately gets you everywhere. Reading through the August 2019 edition of Stamp Collector I found an article that may be of interest to some of our more mature in years members of this forum.

During the 1930's there was a man who devoted himself to his fascination of thunderstorms. His name was Morris Bower and was from Huddersfield but was always known by his second name Morris.

He devised and had printed a postcard of which more than 10.000 in May 1933 were produced and it was part of a remarkable project involving a small array of voluntary observers totally about 1,000 in number  worked for him including naval and military officers, MPs, country vicars, scientists and even shepherds. He wrote to newspapers and magazines asking for volunteers to provide a more widespread cover for reporting thunderstorms. 

Morris and his wife collected the returned postcards and collated the information for what became known as the Thunderstorm Census Organisation. He produced annual reports from the information he gathered. They carried on gathering data until his death in 1982 aged 80.

Following his death his organisation became part of the Tornado and Storm Research Organisation in 1984.

Did any posters on here send in these postcards to him? Perhaps  @knocker or @johnholmes

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Posted
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks

No I never sent in a card but I did once meet Maurice Bower I think was his name, station number was 343. He knew many of the very well known and famous meteorologists, and his house was an absolute treasure trove of meteorology. Hard to get down his hall with so much stuff in.

A very remarkable man, but sorry I cannot help.

 

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