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Last Snow Event London 1991


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Posted
  • Location: south london, sutton
  • Location: south london, sutton

First post on the forum although I have been a regular ...... very impress from the inputs of Murr , TWS, Ian Brown , Stratos and many others.

I am London born and bred so my recollection of snowy winters is different from those from other parts of the country . The last truely snowy event in London was Feb 1991 and what Iam interested in if there a web site or if some has a copy of the maps that shows the set up for that event.

The reason being is that I always remember Michael Fish gave the forecast and what caused all the snow for the SE was what he called a " kink "which developed over Germany and fed over the UK. Is this right and if so was this an highly unsual event. Sad to say say that we had to wait to Jan 2003 before we had the next biggest snow fall ( i know it snowed in between then but im talking more than a dusting !!!) and this year blizzard was amazing for its energy (although all too short lived!!)

If anyone can put flesh to bones I really appreciate it.

Happy snow chasing and lets pray there is something more exciting this season than this usual boring mild crap we get now days

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Posted
  • Location: south london, sutton
  • Location: south london, sutton

Cheers for that , reading the charts wouldnt you agree it was an unsual set up? looks like a scandi high feeding winds in from East causing a low pressure of cold air but the low preesure doesnt look that deep .

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Posted
  • Location: Lincoln, Lincolnshire
  • Weather Preferences: Sunshine, convective precipitation, snow, thunderstorms, "episodic" months.
  • Location: Lincoln, Lincolnshire

I mentioned that 'cold zonality' was dominant during the 1950s, well the 1960s would appear to have been a rather 'easterly' decade. The setup of high pressure over Scandinavia ridging west and feeding cold continental air into the UK, accompanied by precipitation, would appear to have cropped up in every season during the 60s, bar 1966-67.

The period 1978-87 was interesting for snow in that most Decembers were largely snow free, with the exception of 1981 (northerly dominated) and 1982 (cold zonality). The Januarys were snowy but not particularly cold, because most of the snow came from northerlies and cold zonality, 1978 and 1984 being extreme examples. The period was particularly notable, however, for its abundance of easterlies in February, resulting in the joint coldest February decade on record (CET 2.7). Moreover, many of these easterlies were of the cold and snowy variety.

I vaguely remember February 1991. I was only six at the time, but I certainly remember that there was deep snow around that time in South Tyneside that lasted over a week, which can only have come from that event given that I lived at the relevant house between 1988 and 1991.

I have mentioned on other threads that the dominance of the Icelandic Low is a "snow killer" on all fronts- it makes cold zonality less cold due to a longer track over the ocean, it makes northerlies transient, and it prevents high pressure over Scandinavia from ridging westwards.

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  • 1 year later...
Posted
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet
What does "Cold zonality" refer to? Is it a particular synoptic setup?

Cold zonality refors to a meridonal Jet Stream pattern in which lows move in a south easterly direction allowing a transiant northerly.

An example of this is...

Rrea00119840106.gif

Rrea00119840107.gif

Rrea00119840108.gif

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