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M'Lady

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Posted
  • Location: Merseyside
  • Location: Merseyside

    I am the complete opposite of green fingered... I usually kill all plants I come into contact with...

    However, at the moment I have a plant in my kitchen, which has managed to survive since a small child gave it to me in August. (Presumably because I have ignored it.) However, although it had lovely 'bunches' of little red flowers through the summer, these have now died off and left drooping brown heads.

    A work colleague told me I needed to 'dead head' it. I smiled, nodded and thanked her. But I haven't a clue how one goes about dead heading, or indeed what, if any, specialist equipment is required.

    Could somebody with some horticultural knowledge please advise?!

    (I have no idea what the plant is, as it doesn't have one of those useful name label things stuck in the pot.)

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    Posted
  • Location: Merseyside
  • Location: Merseyside

    Thanks Hemmypoos... do I need to buy some of those evil trimmers Wibs has found us after all??

    Flaggypoos... no it isn't... but it looks like that from a distance! There are several flowers in clusters and they are a sort of cross between that flower and a rose!

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    Posted
  • Location: Chichester, West Sussex
  • Location: Chichester, West Sussex

    Dead heading is when you pull, cut or pinch out the dead flowers from the stem as Hemlock has said normally just above the the last leaf before the flower.

    Specialist equipment

    bulldozer.jpg

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    Posted
  • Location: Upper Tweeddale, Scottish Borders 240m ASL
  • Location: Upper Tweeddale, Scottish Borders 240m ASL

    Oooooooh - I had one of those fromt he supermarket.

    They are nearly impossible to kill. Mine lived on the window sill infront of the kitchen sink for about 9 months. It shrivvelled, regrew after watering, flowered again, shrivelled again... Don't know what it's called Lady P - but I reckon even you with your green credentials can make it work!

    I think one of my old housemate's cats* ate it in the end. :D

    *Evil Oscar.

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    Posted
  • Location: Lindum Colonia
  • Location: Lindum Colonia

    It is a Kalanchoe. (I think they are also called 'Flaming Katy')

    They all look slightly different

    Just snip the dead heads off back to nearly the base of the flower stalks

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    Posted
  • Location: Mytholmroyd, West Yorks.......
  • Weather Preferences: Hot & Sunny, Cold & Snowy
  • Location: Mytholmroyd, West Yorks.......
    It is a Kalanchoe. (I think they are also called 'Flaming Katy')

    They all look slightly different

    Just snip the dead heads off back to nearly the base of the flower stalks

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    I don't know F.P., kinda looks like one but the leaves don't look to be off a succulent. Lady P., do the leaves appear waxy and quite fleshy? If you stuck your thumbnail in a leaf did it break of in the shape of the nail stab?

    If it is a Kalanchoe then they are almost as easy as 'plastic flowers' :D

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    Posted
  • Location: SE London
  • Location: SE London
    I don't know F.P., kinda looks like one but the leaves don't look to be off a succulent. Lady P., do the leaves appear waxy and quite fleshy? If you stuck your thumbnail in a leaf did it break of in the shape of the nail stab?

    If it is a Kalanchoe then they are almost as easy as 'plastic flowers' :D

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    well that'll give her confidence as a "budding" gardener :D:D

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    Posted
  • Location: Merseyside
  • Location: Merseyside
    I don't know F.P., kinda looks like one but the leaves don't look to be off a succulent. Lady P., do the leaves appear waxy and quite fleshy? If you stuck your thumbnail in a leaf did it break of in the shape of the nail stab?

    If it is a Kalanchoe then they are almost as easy as 'plastic flowers' :D

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    The leaves are waxy and fleshy... However, even in the name of science, I'm not sticking my nail into one to find out what happens. Yuk!

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    Posted
  • Location: Mytholmroyd, West Yorks.......
  • Weather Preferences: Hot & Sunny, Cold & Snowy
  • Location: Mytholmroyd, West Yorks.......
    The leaves are waxy and fleshy... However, even in the name of science, I'm not sticking my nail into one to find out what happens. Yuk!

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    I take it all back, it is a Kalanchoe and no need to sully your cut(e)icle. :)

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    Posted
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W
  • Location: Kingdom of Fife: 56.2º N, 3.2º W
    Thank you all, you very kind and helpful people.

    I shall attack (I mean prune) my Kalanchoe (ooh, how posh) tomorrow.

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    La! Mme. Guillotine awaits. Off with their heads!

    Dead heading prevents plants from putting their energy into producing seeds so they tend to bloom again later.

    (Durst we talk about the mysteries of feeding and re-potting I wonder?) :)

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    Posted
  • Location: Portland, Dorset
  • Weather Preferences: Mixed winters and springs, thundery summers and meditteranean autumns
  • Location: Portland, Dorset

    After deadheading, a period of 'rest' may help, by reducing watering for a few weeks. When new growth appears, increase watering and feed occasionally. This plant may bloom again in late winter or spring. :)

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    Posted
  • Location: Merseyside
  • Location: Merseyside
    La! Mme. Guillotine awaits. Off with their heads!

    Dead heading prevents plants from putting their energy into producing seeds so they tend to bloom again later.

    (Durst we talk about the mysteries of feeding and re-potting I wonder?) :)

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    Mais oui, mon chere... Let them eat cake.

    (Is this what you and Breezy Brum mean by feeding?!) :)

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    Posted
  • Location: Portland, Dorset
  • Weather Preferences: Mixed winters and springs, thundery summers and meditteranean autumns
  • Location: Portland, Dorset
    Mais oui, mon chere... Let them eat cake.

    (Is this what you and Breezy Brum mean by feeding?!)  :rolleyes:

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    :lol:

    Use 'Baby Bio' ;)

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    Posted
  • Location: Merseyside
  • Location: Merseyside

    Just a quick update, as I know some of you worry about the state of my shrubbery etc.

    My Kalanchoe looks really healthy after its pruning... 3 days on and it's not dead yet! Excellent. :o

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    Just a quick update, as I know some of you worry about the state of my shrubbery etc.

    My Kalanchoe looks really healthy after its pruning... 3 days on and it's not dead yet! Excellent. :)

    <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

    How is your bush looking now Lazy P, is it still looking perky?

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    Posted
  • Location: Merseyside
  • Location: Merseyside

    Well I am worried now... the thought of having an indestructible plant was very comforting.

    And to clarify... my approach is not harsh... just benign neglect. :lol:

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