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We have quite a collection of herbs that we use for cooking, Sage, Thyme, Oregano, Corriander, Fennel, Rosemary etc, in the last week they have been attacked by green fly, as they are used in cooking I don't want to spray them with a pesticide, is there a natural alternative that I can use to get rid of them?

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Posted
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL
  • Location: Derby - 46m (151ft) ASL

    We got major greenfly on our fennel last year. We ended up cutting it right back, as we spray it with anything.

    One possible option is to just spray it them with water, ideally in the sun. Therefore you wash half of them off, and the rest are burnt through reflection. However, its just a possible theory.

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    Posted
  • Location: Llandysul, Ceredigion, Wales
  • Location: Llandysul, Ceredigion, Wales

    You could try spraying a weak soap solution. That's a traditional attack. And then rinse the herbs before use (I rinse herbs before use primarily because of the neighbours cat)!

    Also, you could try attracting as many ladybirds (beetles :) ) to your garden as possible. Dunno how to do that - encourage greenfly probably!

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    Posted
  • Location: Taunton, Somerset
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, thunder, strong winds. HATE:stagnant weather patterns
  • Location: Taunton, Somerset
    We got major One possible option is to just spray it them with water, ideally in the sun. Therefore you wash half of them off, and the rest are burnt through reflection. However, its just a possible theory.

    Wouldn't that scorch the plant?

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    Posted
  • Location: Worcestershire
  • Location: Worcestershire
    Wouldn't that scorch the plant?

    Yes i would have thought so :blink: . I feel sure there was some sort of solution (water based) that wouldnt harm the plant but kill the greenfly?

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    Posted
  • Location: Stewartstown (51m asl) , N.Ireland. (In Dazzling Dazza Land)
  • Location: Stewartstown (51m asl) , N.Ireland. (In Dazzling Dazza Land)

    A shotgun, but that might spoil the herb :blink:

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    Posted
  • Location: NH7256
  • Weather Preferences: where's my vote?
  • Location: NH7256
    Ok, I'll give them a wash down with some soapy water and see where we go from there, hopefully that will get rid of the little blighters.

    it won't unless you use a really strong detergent. Individual attention by folk with lots of spare time is the best unless you go for the stuff my mum still keeps in her shed...

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    Posted
  • Location: Great Yeldham, North Essex
  • Location: Great Yeldham, North Essex

    I find a little washing up liquid in tepid works very well. Also another treatment which seems to work pretty well is to spray a garlic solution onto the aphids. - crush up 2 cloves and add to half a litre of warm water and leave for half an hour. Strain the iquid to remove all pieces of garlic and spray the liquid directly onto the sphids within 2 hours of making the solution - any longer and the solution goes brown and smells different and doesn't seem to work as well. A combination of methods work as well or better than chemicals. A monthly spray of the Garlic solution keeps them at bay.

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    Posted
  • Location: Brixton, South London
  • Location: Brixton, South London

    Well my thoughtd for what they are worth...

    1. In theory an abundance of greenfly should encourage a corresponding increase in their natutral predators: ladybirds.

    2. Chemical sprays adversely affect ladybirds as well as greenfly.

    3. Beware of making the mistake that I made a few years ago: do not confuse the benign ladybird with the evil red lilly beetle. The RLB which was first noticed in Surrey in the 1940s has spread (remarkably slowly) across most of southern England reaching Cornwall in 2003. It is incredibly destructive and can strip a lilly plant of its leaves and flowers in a few days (the plant should recover next year). It leaves a foul black deposit. The RLB can be distinguished from the ladybird by its brown-red clour and lack of black spots. I have to admit that I apply a chemical spray although you can pick the things off by hand.

    4. As alternatives to chemical sprays a vigourous jet of water will dislodge the greenfly (not much use for those of us with hosepipe bans though), or a dilute solution of ordinary washing up liquid.

    5. Finally garlic: rose growers and vegetable gardeners have long advocated sowing garlic amongst roses or vegetables prone to greenfly infestation. Fine Wine's idea of a garlic solution spray is interesting; I will have to try it out!

    Regards

    ACB

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    Posted
  • Location: Douglas, Isle of Man
  • Location: Douglas, Isle of Man

    is it really early enough for greenfly ?, havn't looked at the roses closely yet but as there's new growth on them now maybe there's tasty stuff for them to munch !

    (soapy water is what I heard too, and used a few times on the roses)

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    Posted
  • Location: Mytholmroyd, West Yorks.......
  • Weather Preferences: Hot & Sunny, Cold & Snowy
  • Location: Mytholmroyd, West Yorks.......

    Do you know Aphids are born preggars and start giving birth to offspring as soon as they're out!!!! Soapy water messes with the s.t. of the water and does the aphid in as it feeds on sap (Plant water).

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    Posted
  • Location: Brixton, South London
  • Location: Brixton, South London
    is it really early enough for greenfly ?, havn't looked at the roses closely yet but as there's new growth on them now maybe there's tasty stuff for them to munch !

    (soapy water is what I heard too, and used a few times on the roses)

    The wretches are certainly out here in south London in considerable numbers...

    Regards

    ACB

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    • 3 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: NH7256
  • Weather Preferences: where's my vote?
  • Location: NH7256
    I've just noticed our roses are covered in greenfly..... back in a bit *snigger*

    you've been out a while - are you still on the prowl at this hour?

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    Posted
  • Location: Mytholmroyd, West Yorks.......
  • Weather Preferences: Hot & Sunny, Cold & Snowy
  • Location: Mytholmroyd, West Yorks.......
    Yes, sorry..... I call them greenfly, but I mean aphids :)

    Sycamore trees seem to be the biggest breeding ground for the buggers and seeing as we no longer need the introduced Sycamore for its wood in boat building I say we get rid of 'em!!!! (re-plant some Elms instead) Never mind Ban the Winkie, Ban the Sycamore.

    Aren't Aphids born pregnant??? Kinda like some of the schoolies on the estate here I fear..........

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    Posted
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral
  • Weather Preferences: Summer: warm, humid, thundery. Winter: mild, stormy, some snow.
  • Location: Heswall, Wirral

    grow them indoors? in pots

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