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Posted
  • Location: Sittingbourne, Kent
  • Location: Sittingbourne, Kent

    It is years since I studied 'weather and climate' at school but the fascination has never left. Having spent the last few weeks enjoying all the information here I need to learn more so can anyone recommend any books, courses, websites where I can start as so much of the tech information here is totally beyond me and I want to understand at least some of it.

    Thanks in advance

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    Posted
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks

    try our guides to start with then go to the Met O site=

    www.metoffice.gov.uk I think

    go to the education link and enjoy both NW and UK Met

    ask any questions and one of us will try and answer any query you have

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    Posted
  • Location: Sittingbourne, Kent
  • Location: Sittingbourne, Kent

    I think I am looking in the right place on the MO site but I can only find stuff for kids and teens, most of which I am reasonably OK with. The sort of thing I want to understand is

    'a pretty stout cap in place an OFB from this mornings ongoing MCS '

    I will take a look at the weather prediction site as well. Thanks

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    Posted
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks

    Sloopy a request

    IF you use letters/acronyms etc PLEASE explain what they are-you may understand them others on the forum will not

    thank you

    re the Met O web site try the section for teachers

    this is the link to it

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/education/teac...erstanding.html

    is the Guide section on here any use to you?

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    Posted
  • Location: Sittingbourne, Kent
  • Location: Sittingbourne, Kent
    Sloopy a request

    IF you use letters/acronyms etc PLEASE explain what they are-you may understand them others on the forum will not

    It's those that I don't understand!

    I will take another look at the MetO site.

    Thanks

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    Posted
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks

    'a pretty stout cap in place an OFB from this mornings ongoing MCS

    you and me both

    I am constantly asking everyone, unless its a very well known abbreviation to explain what they mean

    cap= a lid or inversion preventing clouds building

    OFB=your guess is as good as mine!

    MCS= Multi-cell-storm(s)

    good luck with your searching

    these links in our Guides may help, its really just a matter of being patient and learning to walk before running-there is lots of information in NW and on other sites including that of the Met O or the US equivalent at NOAA

    in the Guides these links may help

    http://www.netweather.tv/forum/index.php?showforum=69

    or this one

    http://www.netweather.tv/forum/index.php?showtopic=46420

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    Posted
  • Location: Stanley, County Durham.
  • Weather Preferences: Anything Extreme!
  • Location: Stanley, County Durham.
    It's those that I don't understand!

    I will take another look at the MetO site.

    Thanks

    Here's the link for the guides on the Met Office site...

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/corporate/libr...ides/index.html

    Think i'll have a look at those myself :D

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    Posted
  • Location: Hayward’s Heath - home, Brighton/East Grinstead - work.
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and storms
  • Location: Hayward’s Heath - home, Brighton/East Grinstead - work.
    I think I am looking in the right place on the MO site but I can only find stuff for kids and teens, most of which I am reasonably OK with. The sort of thing I want to understand is

    'a pretty stout cap in place an OFB from this mornings ongoing MCS '

    I will take a look at the weather prediction site as well. Thanks

    "a pretty stout cap in place an out flow boundary from this mornings ongoing multi cell storm system"

    Hi Sloopy, I think the guides you need to read are the storm chasers guides found below:

    http://www.netweather.tv/forum/index.php?showtopic=37775

    These are top class from NF.

    c

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    Posted
  • Location: Sittingbourne, Kent
  • Location: Sittingbourne, Kent

    Oh thanks everyone, I think I have plenty to read now. I had totally missed the guides on here, too tied up with virtual storm chasing I think.

    Just as well I have a holiday soon - I see a little light reading coming on :D

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    Posted
  • Location: Caterham-on-the-hill, Surrey, 190m asl (home), Heathrow (work)
  • Location: Caterham-on-the-hill, Surrey, 190m asl (home), Heathrow (work)

    OFB = Outflow Boundary. Where outflow from a storm area, often an MCS (Multi-cellular Storm) creates a trough and convergence when air pushes out against prevailing sfc flow and often is the focus for storms to develop. Can happen in the UK in summer too.

    Cap = basically where a layer of relatively warm air aloft, usually in the 850 - 700mb layer prevents parcels of air rising and creating convection due the parcels not becoming warmer than the surrounding air in that warm layer as they rise. Parcels will only rise and create convective cloud if they are warmer than the surrounding air it rises through - taking in account a parcel will cool aswell as it rises. High temperatures or strong forcing mechanism may over come the cap and allow thunderstorms to develop.

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    Posted
  • Location: Omaha, Nebraska USA
  • Location: Omaha, Nebraska USA

    Sloopy... I think you might have seen those abbreviations in the "Storm Chase USA 2009" discussion. In weather terminology here in the US, MCS means "mesoscale convective system". Of course, a mesoscale convective system is basically another way to describe a Multi-cellular Storm; so I guess it really doesn't matter which defination that you use.

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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts
  • Weather Preferences: Rain/snow, fog, gales and cold in every season
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts
    It is years since I studied 'weather and climate' at school but the fascination has never left. Having spent the last few weeks enjoying all the information here I need to learn more so can anyone recommend any books, courses, websites where I can start as so much of the tech information here is totally beyond me and I want to understand at least some of it.

    Thanks in advance

    With regard to books, try and get a copy of 'Climate and the British Scene' by Gordon Manley; it's an old book but a classic and will give you a good grounding on the basics of meteorology and how the weather and climate relates to society in general.

    Another good one, and more recent, is 'Climates of the British Isles' edited by Mike Hulme and Elaine Barrow and published by Routledge; a wealth of information in there.

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    Posted
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
    With regard to books, try and get a copy of 'Climate and the British Scene' by Gordon Manley; it's an old book but a classic and will give you a good grounding on the basics of meteorology and how the weather and climate relates to society in general.

    ah Gordon Manley-voices from the past-wonderful

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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts
  • Weather Preferences: Rain/snow, fog, gales and cold in every season
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts
    ah Gordon Manley-voices from the past-wonderful

    Couldn't agree more, John. Climate and the British Scene is the most read book in my collection, I never tire of it.

    His obvious enthusiasm for the subject, his perceptiveness and, what I can only describe as, an air of Britishness, is second to none.

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    Posted
  • Location: Sittingbourne, Kent
  • Location: Sittingbourne, Kent

    I managed to find the Gordon Manley one on Amazon for 0.75p!

    Picture me lazing by the pool in Florida in a few weeks time, reading about British climate and hoping for the odd afternoon t'storm.

    Thanks again

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