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Recommendations for first year university meteorology textbooks


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Posted
  • Location: Edinburgh (previously Chelmsford and Birmingham)
  • Weather Preferences: Unseasonably cold weather (at all times of year), wind, and thunderstorms.
  • Location: Edinburgh (previously Chelmsford and Birmingham)

I am not actually going to do a meteorology degree, I have just finished my first year in physics actually. However, my interest in meteorology, after being just a casual one for the last five or so years, has got to the point where I want to get to grips with it a bit more seriously. I figured as something to study on the side during my second year learning some meteorology would compliment my physics, and vice versa.

 

For this reason, I would like some recommendations for first year meteorology textbooks (or anything else for that matter that will help me get to grips with meteorology in a much more rigorous and scientific way), so that I can improve upon my current, rudimentary understanding of the subject. I have had a look around but there seems to be a fair few to choose from.

 

A bit of an odd question but thanks to anyone who takes the time to answer this.

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Posted
  • Location: Near King's Lynn 13.68m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Hoar Frost, Snow, Misty Autumn mornings
  • Location: Near King's Lynn 13.68m ASL

If you're not intimidated by multivariable or vector calculus (which I guess you won't be as a physics student) then this is a heavyweight technical text:

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Introduction-Dynamic-Meteorology-International-Geophysics-ebook/dp/B009YE8RQM/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1437567848&sr=8-2&keywords=JAMES+R+HOLTON

 

Even for a second-year physics student it's tough going, but probably worth it.

 

For detailed non-maths exposition, this is another standard text. It's US-biased, but still useful and beautifully illustrated.

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Essentials-Meteorology-An-Invitation-Atmosphere/dp/0840049331

 

For climate, I like this. It's short, and there's some Maths but it's not as dense as the Holton text above:

 

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/elementary-climate-physics-9780198567349?cc=gb〈=en&

 

What I find when reading these is that there's so much else you need to know about if you *really* want to understand what's going on: chemistry, statistics, fluid dynamics, etc.  

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Posted
  • Location: Aylesbury
  • Location: Aylesbury

I found Holton useful for the mathematical side of things. It can be a bit of a tough read though!!

 

In my first year I purchased a different book by Ahrens which I found very good for explanations:

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0495555746?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00

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Posted
  • Location: Edinburgh (previously Chelmsford and Birmingham)
  • Weather Preferences: Unseasonably cold weather (at all times of year), wind, and thunderstorms.
  • Location: Edinburgh (previously Chelmsford and Birmingham)

If you're not intimidated by multivariable or vector calculus (which I guess you won't be as a physics student) then this is a heavyweight technical text:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Introduction-Dynamic-Meteorology-International-Geophysics-ebook/dp/B009YE8RQM/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1437567848&sr=8-2&keywords=JAMES+R+HOLTON

Even for a second-year physics student it's tough going, but probably worth it.

For detailed non-maths exposition, this is another standard text. It's US-biased, but still useful and beautifully illustrated.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Essentials-Meteorology-An-Invitation-Atmosphere/dp/0840049331

For climate, I like this. It's short, and there's some Maths but it's not as dense as the Holton text above:

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/elementary-climate-physics-9780198567349?cc=gb〈=en&

What I find when reading these is that there's so much else you need to know about if you *really* want to understand what's going on: chemistry, statistics, fluid dynamics, etc.

Thanks! I'll give those a look. I'm familiar with multivariable and vector calculus, so that shouldn't be a problem. Stats and fluid dynamics shouldn't be too much of a problem either as I'll be doing a LOT of it this year and I did a fair amount in my first year.

I only have an A-Level in chemistry though. Does it become particularly challenging on the chemistry side of things?

Edited by 22nov10blast
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Posted
  • Location: Edinburgh (previously Chelmsford and Birmingham)
  • Weather Preferences: Unseasonably cold weather (at all times of year), wind, and thunderstorms.
  • Location: Edinburgh (previously Chelmsford and Birmingham)

I found Holton useful for the mathematical side of things. It can be a bit of a tough read though!!

In my first year I purchased a different book by Ahrens which I found very good for explanations:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0495555746?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00

Thanks for your suggestion, I'll give it a look :) Edited by 22nov10blast
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Posted
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks
  • Location: just south of Doncaster, Sth Yorks

I am not actually going to do a meteorology degree, I have just finished my first year in physics actually. However, my interest in meteorology, after being just a casual one for the last five or so years, has got to the point where I want to get to grips with it a bit more seriously. I figured as something to study on the side during my second year learning some meteorology would compliment my physics, and vice versa.

 

For this reason, I would like some recommendations for first year meteorology textbooks (or anything else for that matter that will help me get to grips with meteorology in a much more rigorous and scientific way), so that I can improve upon my current, rudimentary understanding of the subject. I have had a look around but there seems to be a fair few to choose from.

 

A bit of an odd question but thanks to anyone who takes the time to answer this.

 

for a very basic understanding of the subject try this

Essentials of Meteorology by DH Mcintosh and AS Thom.

Got me through my Met interview and was a good grounding for 6 months of solid maths and physics for theoretical meteorology, particularly the fluid dynamics. It is a basic book though and you will probably need something 'one up' from that after understanding M and T!

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  • 3 months later...

As a first year Met student myself, I'd definitely recommend "Fundamentals of Weather & Climate, 2nd editon", by Robin Mcllveen. It gives a pretty good overview of the most important aspects, and while I haven't read all (or even most!) of it yet, it doesn't seem to be too maths heavy.

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fundamentals-Weather-Climate-Robin-McIlveen/dp/0199215421

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