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The Times: The Atlantic v Scandinavian block; Jan 1924


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Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam

    I was going to post this early next month but since a scenario similiar to this could happen again possibly next week I will post it now.

    In early January 1924, a block developed around Scandinavia and there was a battle between it and Atlantic systems coming up against the block. One such low push SEwards into northern France off the Southwest approaches producing SEly gales and a mixture of rain, sleet and snow on the 8th but the snow became more extensive on the 9th as colder air was pulled in producing blizzards and drifting snow. Numerous areas recorded several inches of snow.

    The Atlantic won the battle on the 10th as it started to push the block SEwards into eastern Europe.

    This is from the Times of the 9th of January 1924

    1924a.jpg

    1924b.jpg

    1924c.jpg

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    Posted
  • Location: 115meters ASL, Andover,Hampshire
  • Location: 115meters ASL, Andover,Hampshire

    post-1955-1199014051_thumb.png

    Quiet a big difference in the position of the HP cell to our NE ,this just shows we need the HP cell further west to produce a situation like 1924.

    I think these changes in our current set up are possible but i am not sure it will happen

    Thanks for the info Mr Data very intersting to see what MIGHT happen

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    Posted
  • Location: Bishopbriggs, near Glasgow
  • Weather Preferences: Cold snowy winters, warm dry summers
  • Location: Bishopbriggs, near Glasgow

    Looking at the models this morning, I am wondering if we are all looking at the same charts, all I can see is a brief spell of cold southeasterly winds for 24 hours and then the mild atlantic comes in.

    Will someone please tell me I am wromg.

    SS"

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    Posted
  • Location: Head in the clouds somewhere near Avondale, West Auckland
  • Weather Preferences: Storm-force northeasterly(with a high tide!).Blizzards.Sunny summer
  • Location: Head in the clouds somewhere near Avondale, West Auckland

    The jet going around to the north of the high is far too strong. Therefore the high is not shown exerting/penetrating its influence further west/northwest. In the 1924 situation shown for example, a weaker high over Scandinavia does not have a strong southwesterly flow going around it to the north.

    I can only assume that current blocking highs dont have the influence they had in the past, due to the complete absence, in winter, of any kind of reliable Arctic high, with the jet always flattening the block and forcing it south and east.

    Like Sandy, I dont see any real penetration of the cold air from the east, the low seems to just about drag in some continental air, but even that has its true origin to our south, which by then has been very mild for several days.

    A fairly big upgrade would still be needed to get any real cold penetrating from the east

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    Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam
    The jet going around to the north of the high is far too strong. Therefore the high is not shown exerting/penetrating its influence further west/northwest. In the 1924 situation shown for example, a weaker high over Scandinavia does not have a strong southwesterly flow going around it to the north.

    I can only assume that current blocking highs dont have the influence they had in the past, due to the complete absence, in winter, of any kind of reliable Arctic high, with the jet always flattening the block and forcing it south and east.

    In 1924, the Atlantic fairly quickly overcame the Scandi block and it sank as can be seen here only 2 or 3 days later

    http://www.wetterzentrale.de/archive/slp/1...slp19240112.gif

    It was a common theme that often plagued the winters of the 1920s and 1930s. Lack of strong northerly blocking. The coldest CET month of the 1930s was December 1933 with a CET of 1.6, that was a basically an anticyclonic block similiar to the one that we recently had that sat around the UK for so long.

    Edited by Mr_Data
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    Posted
  • Location: Near Romford Essex.
  • Location: Near Romford Essex.
    In 1924, the Atlantic fairly quickly overcame the Scandi block and it sank as can be seen here only 2 or 3 days later

    http://www.wetterzentrale.de/archive/slp/1...slp19240112.gif

    It was a common theme that often plagued the winters of the 1920s and 1930s. Lack of strong northerly blocking. The coldest CET month of the 1930s was December 1933 with a CET of 1.6, that was a basically an anticyclonic block similiar to the one that we recently had that sat around the UK for so long.

    even larger teapot back in those to decades then kevin ;) Regards D.

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