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Ninja tree raids


crimsone

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Posted
  • Location: New Zealand
  • Location: New Zealand

    I have a plan... I don't know if it's a good plan, but I like it, and I'm going to try it. It basically involves germinating tree seeds and growing them on in pots - particularly easy to do with apples, but other trees work (though I refuse to use sycamore!). when they are strong enough, after carefully selecting the most viable of urban locations (where hopefully they won't be strimmed, grazed, or pulled out, and won't be obtrusive), I will go out, and plant them while nobodies looking, in the hope that they will go on to become full blown trees.

    Anybody fancy joining me?

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    I have a plan... I don't know if it's a good plan, but I like it, and I'm going to try it. It basically involves germinating tree seeds and growing them on in pots - particularly easy to do with apples, but other trees work (though I refuse to use sycamore!). when they are strong enough, after carefully selecting the most viable of urban locations (where hopefully they won't be strimmed, grazed, or pulled out, and won't be obtrusive), I will go out, and plant them while nobodies looking, in the hope that they will go on to become full blown trees.

    Anybody fancy joining me?

    why not sycamore crimsone????

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    Posted
  • Location: New Zealand
  • Location: New Zealand

    It's evil and invasive. It's a naturalised tree (sadly), but I hate it for the fact that in destroys natural and semi-natural ancient woodland alike...

    ... That, and in an urban environment, it can be a pest. Sycamore saplings get everywhere, and often end up growing right where they can do damage.

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    It's evil and invasive. It's a naturalised tree (sadly), but I hate it for the fact that in destroys natural and semi-natural ancient woodland alike...

    ... That, and in an urban environment, it can be a pest. Sycamore saplings get everywhere, and often end up growing right where they can do damage.

    Good answer! :shok:

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    • 3 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Putney, SW London. A miserable 14m asl....but nevertheless the lucky recipient of c 20cm of snow in 12 hours 1-2 Feb 2009!
  • Location: Putney, SW London. A miserable 14m asl....but nevertheless the lucky recipient of c 20cm of snow in 12 hours 1-2 Feb 2009!
    I have a plan... I don't know if it's a good plan, but I like it, and I'm going to try it. It basically involves germinating tree seeds and growing them on in pots - particularly easy to do with apples, but other trees work (though I refuse to use sycamore!). when they are strong enough, after carefully selecting the most viable of urban locations (where hopefully they won't be strimmed, grazed, or pulled out, and won't be obtrusive), I will go out, and plant them while nobodies looking, in the hope that they will go on to become full blown trees.

    Anybody fancy joining me?

    I'm with you, Crimsone....and in fact ahead of you. Twenty-five years ago, when they were developing an estate over the end of my garden wall, I transplanted into a grassy bit well away from the buildings two shrubs that were outgrowing my garden, together with a tree that had conveniently self-seeded in an unused pot.

    One of the two shrubs - a large, semi-evergreen Buddleia globosa - was alas later destroyed when they extended the parking. But the other shrub - a smaller variegated Buddleia davidii - only died a couple of years ago; and the tree - a Robinia pseudacacia - is alive and kicking: it must be 40 ft and more high, and a valuable part of the green screen that almost completely hides the estate from me in summer. I went over the other side recently to scout for new receiving areas; but they have a very active Neighbourhood Watch, and I was approached and quizzed about what I was doing there within a few minutes...I don't think they'd take too kindly to night time digging expeditions!

    I get a host of young saplings courtesy of the squirrels' amnesia, and often grow them on (though yes, sycamores are ruthlessly excised). I've transplanted two holm oaks and a horse chestnut to places in the country (S Wales, actually for one of them), and have a nice young regular oak (Quercus robur) ready to go. Inspired by you I may try and find a more urban destination for it.

    Phantom tree planters unite!

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    Posted
  • Location: Winchester
  • Location: Winchester

    We've got one of those roads where you have road then curb then grass then pavement if you know what I mean. Unfortunately unlike a road a few across they have not planted trees in the grassy bits.. I've been wondering for some time whether to sneak out and plant a tree there when no one is looking (perhaps in the dead of night :) )

    Wasn't sure if I could get in trouble for it mind.. ?

    I'm sure if I applied to the coucil they would decline to allow it on the basis of possible future damage to road and pavement.. but still, it would be green and would look nice! :)

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    Posted
  • Location: St. Albans, Herts
  • Location: St. Albans, Herts
    I have a plan... I don't know if it's a good plan, but I like it, and I'm going to try it. It basically involves germinating tree seeds and growing them on in pots - particularly easy to do with apples, but other trees work (though I refuse to use sycamore!). when they are strong enough, after carefully selecting the most viable of urban locations (where hopefully they won't be strimmed, grazed, or pulled out, and won't be obtrusive), I will go out, and plant them while nobodies looking, in the hope that they will go on to become full blown trees.

    Anybody fancy joining me?

    Hey, my mum and dad started doing that years ago along the road where they live. It's a bit rural, so they hardly got disturbed, and some 10 years later they now have several foot tall oaks dotted along their road. It's a bit of fun to try and find them each time we go for a walk!

    Fab idea!

    EDIT: For the first few years they hid them from the farmers/council by pushing tall grass up round them...seemed to keep them out of sight and mind!

    EDIT2: There is even a support group....hehehehehe!

    http://www.guerrillagardening.org/

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    Posted
  • Location: Putney, SW London. A miserable 14m asl....but nevertheless the lucky recipient of c 20cm of snow in 12 hours 1-2 Feb 2009!
  • Location: Putney, SW London. A miserable 14m asl....but nevertheless the lucky recipient of c 20cm of snow in 12 hours 1-2 Feb 2009!

    Thanks for that link, Roo. This is all right up my street - literally as well as metaphorically, as I'm now planning to do some planting at the base of some of the trees in my road!

    Ossie

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and lots of it or warm and sunny, no mediocre dross
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl

    I hate to pee on anyone's bonfire, so to speak but can I please add a note of caution here. Trees can and do cause immense damage to buildings and roads; there are no particular rogues or problem trees as such, just wrong position.

    I'm all for greening up our landscape, but please bear in mind the folk who have to live with that enormous tree 30 years hence. If it's planted out in the road or on the verge then any subsidence claims will be directed towards the council, when they turn around and say "hey we didn't plant it" then the householder could end up with large bills and an uninsurable, decreased in value property.

    Add into this equation, that if it's causing problems it will probably be felled and all those creatures which have set up home in it will be without a roost too.

    Here's a couple of tables for planting distances of trees:

    http://www.subsidencebureau.com/subsidence_trees.htm

    http://www.abi.org.uk/Display/default.asp?...mp;Child_ID=405

    The most susceptible areas are those with a clay subsoil; the visible top soil is no indication of the subsoil - if in doubt dig a hole at least three foot deep and have a look.

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    Posted
  • Location: St. Albans, Herts
  • Location: St. Albans, Herts
    Thanks for that link, Roo. This is all right up my street - literally as well as metaphorically, as I'm now planning to do some planting at the base of some of the trees in my road!

    Ossie

    It is fantastic isn't it? I remember seeing a telly prog about it a few years ago: all these people turn up at night and transform neglected spaces. The councils in question quite often turn a blind eye as they realise they get the credit with none of the cost.

    I have my eye on the grotty bit of green at the end of our road: am going to canvass support from some people on our road when we have a pint on sunday.....

    And as for tree damage, noted, but often there are spaces where they wouldn't hurt [such as my parents road which has no houses and where all the natives have been ground out by over zealous farmers], or where a previous tree has not been replaced. Takes a bit of sense admittedly, but then how many times have buildings been put in daft places? Maybe it's time we gave the trees a chance?

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