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Hundreds of birds of prey are being shot or poisoned in UK


knocker
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Posted
  • Location: Camborne
  • Location: Camborne

    RSPB calls on shooting industry to help stamp out problem as a report shows birds, including golden eagles, hen harriers and red kites were illegally killed last year

     

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/oct/30/hundreds-of-birds-of-prey-being-shot-or-poisoned-in-uk-rspb

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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District South Pennines Middleton & Smerrill Tops 305m (1001ft) asl.
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District South Pennines Middleton & Smerrill Tops 305m (1001ft) asl.

    The Estates which still hold shoots will be the biggest culprits, As keepers are given the "nod" to keep numbers down to protect there corn laden Pheasants for money laundering corporate groups to blast away at..   Disgusting!

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    Posted
  • Location: Alresford, Near Colchester, Essex
  • Weather Preferences: As long as it's not North Sea muck, I'll cope.
  • Location: Alresford, Near Colchester, Essex

    Yes, I used to go for lunchtime walks, where I worked, near a large shooting estate. Every day you'd see buzzards wheeling and it was a pleasant sight, because more than 15 years ago buzzards were a vanishingly rare sight where I live and work, due to historical persecution.

     

    Then suddenly they were no more. This wasn't at a time of migration either.  :angry:

     

    Descendants of Anglo-Norman leeches, still leeching.

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    Posted
  • Location: North York Moors
  • Location: North York Moors

    How are the numbers actually doing - Nationally.
    Increased substantially I would think.
    A degree of balance is often required, if the shoot is not able to turn a profit the area won't be managed properly and a range of species suffer - because the upland landscape of Britain has been managed for thousands of years and is not natural.
    Various predator birds can be culled legally for example crows and magpies.

     

     

    Descendants of Anglo-Norman leeches, still leeching.

    You really have no idea of the reality.
    The typical big landowner now has roots in big business and runs the estate as a sideline enterprise.
    For example the main landowner of the moors here made his money from frozen fish and Carphone Warehouse.
    The previous owner had been with an engineering company in the Gulf.
    The estate hasn't belonged to what you'd no doubt call a Toff since the first world war when they were wiped out on The Somme.

    The remaining gentry landowners (sorry that's "Descendants of Anglo-Norman leeches, still leeching") have less pressure to run an estate commercially and are far less likely to employ more ruthless keepers 

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    Posted
  • Location: North York Moors
  • Location: North York Moors

    Since this topic has all the hallmarks of a netweather favourite anti-capitalist/anti-toff rant-fest I shall leave you to revel in reinforcing your invented stereotypes..

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    Posted
  • Location: Near Newton Abbot or east Dartmoor, Devon
  • Location: Near Newton Abbot or east Dartmoor, Devon

    How are the numbers actually doing - Nationally.

    Increased substantially I would think.

    A degree of balance is often required...

     

    Clever!

     

    Yes, if you lump in all birds of prey, all, then numbers may be up. That would mostly be due to recovery in numbers of buzzard I guess. But such talk would obscure changes to populations of individual species of raptors...

     

    What is also clever is you don't dispute the actual thrust of this thread.

     

    So, questions:

     

    1, do you dispute the numbers Knocker presents?

    2, which species of raptor are increasing 'substantially' in number?

     

    Sorry, but on your past form I don't espect any answers :(

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    Posted
  • Location: Near Newton Abbot or east Dartmoor, Devon
  • Location: Near Newton Abbot or east Dartmoor, Devon

    Since this topic has all the hallmarks of a netweather favourite anti-capitalist/anti-toff rant-fest I shall leave you to revel in reinforcing your invented stereotypes..

     

    Which, of course, is a nice example of stereotyping...

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    Posted
  • Location: Camborne
  • Location: Camborne

    Since this topic has all the hallmarks of a netweather favourite anti-capitalist/anti-toff rant-fest I shall leave you to revel in reinforcing your invented stereotypes..

     

    Oh the irony of that.

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    Posted
  • Location: South Yorkshire
  • Location: South Yorkshire

    They ain't got nuthin' on our six-month old moggie who in the space of one hour last week dragged thru' the cat flap 3 rats, 5 or 6 mice, 3 blackbirds, a coupla sparrows and a whole bunch of worms. He's now grounded.

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    Posted
  • Location: Alresford, Near Colchester, Essex
  • Weather Preferences: As long as it's not North Sea muck, I'll cope.
  • Location: Alresford, Near Colchester, Essex

    How are the numbers actually doing - Nationally.

    Increased substantially I would think.

    A degree of balance is often required, if the shoot is not able to turn a profit the area won't be managed properly and a range of species suffer - because the upland landscape of Britain has been managed for thousands of years and is not natural.

    Various predator birds can be culled legally for example crows and magpies.

     

    You really have no idea of the reality.

     

    I have a bit / (or a lot) more idea than you might think. I've seen things at very close hand.

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    Posted
  • Location: Near Newton Abbot or east Dartmoor, Devon
  • Location: Near Newton Abbot or east Dartmoor, Devon

    They ain't got nuthin' on our six-month old moggie who in the space of one hour last week dragged thru' the cat flap 3 rats, 5 or 6 mice, 3 blackbirds, a coupla sparrows and a whole bunch of worms. He's now grounded.

     

    The populations of said birds and those of raptors (espically the ones in question) are very similar and thus equally able to sustain the same rates of degridation?

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    Posted
  • Location: winscombe north somerset
  • Weather Preferences: action weather
  • Location: winscombe north somerset

     .We have Buzzards by the dozen gliding around most days ,a pair of perrigrins not too far away ,and indeed a couple of weeks ago the parents were driving this years chicks away .its great to see ,but i have witnessed poisoning in the process several years ago , not sure by what type of person and for what reason ,but its great to see our population of birds of prey grace our skys .quite often see our local perri return with a small rabbit , long may it continue ,cheers .

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    Posted
  • Location: Camborne
  • Location: Camborne

    'Worst' bird of prey poisoner Allen Lambert given suspended sentence

     

    A gamekeeper convicted of "the worst case of bird of prey poisoning" recorded in England has been given a 10-week suspended sentence.

     

    Allen Lambert, 65, who worked on the Stody Estate, near Holt in Norfolk, was found guilty of deliberately killing 10 buzzards and a sparrowhawk.

     

    Head of RSPB investigations Bob Elliot said the discovery of the carcasses at Lambert's home was "truly dreadful".

     

    _78795135_ninepoisonedbuzzardsrspb.jpg

     

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-29931463

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