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Posted
  • Location: Carnoustie Angus Scotland. (week days) Dundee (weekends)
  • Location: Carnoustie Angus Scotland. (week days) Dundee (weekends)

    Please could someone be so kind and to tell me what is going on with this plant!! The fence is over 6 feet tall, i can assure you that was no where to be seen 10 days ago. We weeded and tidied up and trimmed those plants. Also what is it called (the plant i mean).

    thanks Mandy.

    post-561-1246746146_thumb.jpg

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    Posted
  • Location: Western Isle of Wight
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, Storm, anything loud and dramatic.
  • Location: Western Isle of Wight

    I think they are Agaves, native to the Mediterranean and South America, a sign of a good summer in the UK if they flower, quite rare to see this type of plant in flower outside. Sadly the plants die after flowering and setting seed.

    Sometimes the local papers write articles about them when one is discovered flowering.

    I would say very unusual to see one in flower in Scotland.

    Russ.

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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts
  • Weather Preferences: Rain/snow, fog, gales and cold in every season
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District 290 mts. Wind speed 340 mts

    It's a Phormium ( New Zealand Flax ) but from the photo' can't tell exactly which variety.

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    Posted
  • Location: Western Isle of Wight
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, Storm, anything loud and dramatic.
  • Location: Western Isle of Wight

    They looked like Agaves to me at 0630, but you are more than likely right TM :doh:

    My apologies,

    Russ

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    Posted
  • Location: Sittingbourne, Kent
  • Location: Sittingbourne, Kent

    Definitely Phormiums, I have 2 in the garden and they both have these flower spikes.

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and lots of it or warm and sunny, no mediocre dross
  • Location: Cheddar Valley, 20mtrs asl

    They're definitely Phormiums. They have a tendency to be monocarpic which means once they've flowered, they die. If you look at the base of the plant you'll see what appear to be separate clumps of leaves, these are separate growth crowns, only the crowns with flowers may die off, leaving the rest of the clump healthy. If they do die off, leave them to wither then twist the group of leaves all together, keep twisting and they should come away completely, leaving a gap for another crown to grow. If you cut them off, you're more likely to keep a gap there plus the remains of the leaves will rot down, leaving the plant vulnerable to disease.

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    Posted
  • Location: Carnoustie Angus Scotland. (week days) Dundee (weekends)
  • Location: Carnoustie Angus Scotland. (week days) Dundee (weekends)

    Lol David thats what my other half said.

    Thanks all for your replies. Maybe a good sign of the decent weather we have had.

    Jethro will try to do do as you said. Thanks again.

    Mandy x

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    Posted
  • Location: Bramley, Hampshire, 70m asl
  • Location: Bramley, Hampshire, 70m asl
    It's a Phormium ( New Zealand Flax ) but from the photo' can't tell exactly which variety.

    Yes that's exactly what it is - I've got two in my garden also flowering this year. Not sure about them dying after flowering - as these plants of mine also flowered 2 years ago, while those in my dads garden back in NZ flower most years.

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    Posted
  • Location: Broadstone, Poole
  • Location: Broadstone, Poole

    Have got 2 of these in my garden that flower almost every year but will bow to the judgement of the peps on here as even though I planted them about 8 yrs ago - I can't remember the name.

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